Displaying items by tag: The Artist

(Feb. 27, 2013)—The Humane Society of the United States has chosen Uggie, the world famous, scene-stealing Jack Russell terrier from last year’s Academy Award-winning film “The Artist,” to be the spokesdog for its Pets of Valor Award.

The award celebrates the human-animal bond by honoring rescued or adopted dogs and cats who have exhibited an extraordinary sense of courage or resolve by heroically helping a person in need. Acclaimed for his portrayal of a loyal dog who courageously rescues his owner from a fire in “The Artist,” Uggie is uniquely qualified for his spokesdog duties and he will help announce the winner on June 2.

“Uggie’s honored to have been chosen by The Humane Society of the United States to be spokesdog for The Pets of Valor Award, although he did hesitate at first when he heard that cats were to be included, but now he likes the idea of having an excuse to bark for them, instead of at them,” says Omar Von Muller, Uggie’s owner and trainer.

Uggie has a best-selling autobiography (“Uggie – My Story”) to his credit, as well as the distinction of being the first dog to have his pawprints memorialized outside Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood. But now the mega star pooch, who was adopted by Von Muller after his first family rejected him for being “too wild,” is using his fame to shine the light on his unsung fellow companion animal heroes and to encourage pet adoption.

“It’s always gratifying when a star of Uggie’s magnitude takes time out of his busy schedule to give back. As spokesdog for The Humane Society of the United States’ Pets of Valor Award, Uggie proves he’s a hero both on and off screen by advocating for the adoption of his fellow companion animals,” says Beverly Kaskey, senior director of HSUS’ Hollywood Outreach.

Uggie is calling on all humans to nominate dogs and cats who have committed heroic acts between Jan. 1, 2012 and March 31, 2013 to submit details of their actions to humanesociety.org/petsofvalor. Drawing on Uggie’s insider knowledge, HSUS’ companion animal experts will select five finalists, based on the significance and impact of the dog or cat’s valor, and the winner will be chosen by a public online vote that runs May 24-31, 2013.

 

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The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization, rated the most effective by its peers. Since 1954, The HSUS has been fighting for the protection of all animals through advocacy, education and hands-on programs. We rescue and care for tens of thousands of animals each year, but our primary mission is to prevent cruelty before it occurs. We're there for all animals, across America and around the world. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty -- on the Web at humanesociety.org.

 

Winner of the prize for Best Actor at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, Michel Hazanavicius’s THE ARTIST is a heartfelt and entertaining valentine to classic American cinema. Set during the twilight of Hollywood’s silent era and shot on location in Los Angeles, THE ARTIST tells the story of a charismatic movie star unhappily confronting the new world of talking pictures. Mixing comedy, romance and melodrama, THE ARTIST is itself an example of the form it celebrates: a black-and-white silent film that relies on images, actors and music to weave its singular spell.

Hollywood, 1927. George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) is one of Hollywood’s reigning silent screen idols, instantly recognizable with his slim moustache and signature white tie and tails. Starring in exotic tales of intrigue and derring-do, the actor has turned out hit after hit for Kinograph, the studio run by cigar-chomping mogul Al Zimmer (John Goodman). His success has brought him an elegant mansion and an equally elegant wife, Doris (Penelope Ann Miller). Chauffeured to the studio each day by his devoted driver Clifton (James Cromwell), George is greeted by his own smiling image, emblazoned on the posters prominently placed throughout the Kinograph lot. As he happily mugs for rapturous fans and reporters at his latest film premiere, George is a man indistinguishable from his persona -- and a star secure in his future.

For young dancer Peppy Miller (Bérénice Bejo), the future will be what she makes of it. Vivacious and good-humored, with an incandescent smile and a flapper’s ease of movement, Peppy first crosses George’s path at his film premiere and then as an extra on his latest film at Kinograph. As they film a brief dance sequence, the leading man and the newcomer fall into a natural rhythm, the machinery of moviemaking fading into the background. But the day must finally end, sending the matinee idol and the eager hopeful back to their respective places on the Hollywood ladder.

And Hollywood itself will soon fall under sway of a captivating new starlet: talking pictures. George wants no part of the new technology, scorning the talkie as a vulgar fad destined for the dustbin. By 1929, Kinograph is preparing to cease all silent film production and

George faces a choice: embrace sound, like the rising young star Peppy Miller; or risk a slide into obscurity.

The Weinstein Company presents THE ARTIST, written and directed by Michel Hazanavicius and produced by Thomas Langmann. Starring Jean Dujardin, Bérénice Bejo, John Goodman, James Cromwell, Penelope Ann Miller, Malcolm McDowell, Missi Pyle, Beth Grant, Ed Lauter, Joel Murray, and Ken Davitan. With Uggie as The Dog.