Displaying items by tag: Museum

 

New York, NY- The American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog is pleased to announce that the official bronze statue of Sgt. Stubby, a distinguished World War I war dog will be housed permanently at the AKC Museum of the Dog. The sculpture will be unveiled on May 23, 2019.

The statue, “Stubby Salutes,” created by renowned sculptor Susan Bahary, is a life sized bronze of the bull terrier mix. Stubby is widely regarded as the U.S Army’s first service dog. His service began in 1917 when he wandered on to the camp of the 102nd Infantry Regiment of the 26th Yankee Division at Yale. He formed a bond with a young solider named Robert Conroy who named him “Stubby.” Conroy subsequently smuggled Stubby on his ship when it was time to ship out. Stubby served in France for 18 months and a total of 17 battles. His heroic feats included: warning his unit of looming mustard gas attacks, locating wounded soldiers on the battlefield and sitting beside them until help arrived, and capturing a German spy by grabbing at the seat of his pants. Over the course of his service, he was injured by mustard gas and a grenade. Stubby is remembered for his bravery and also as a treasured mascot who brought joy to embattled soldiers. As a veteran, he was awarded a medal for his bravery by General John J. Pershing and met three presidents.

This April marked the 100th anniversary of Stubby’s return to the US to a hero’s welcome.

“We are very excited to welcome “Stubby Salutes” to our Museum collection,” said Alan Fausel, Executive Director of the AKC Museum of the Dog. “His courage and dedication to our country has laid the foundation for today’s military woking dogs and we look forward to sharing him with the public and educating them about his place in history.”

Susan Bahary, an internationally acclaimed artist, was commissioned by the decendants of Robert Conroy to memorialize Stubby in his rare salute pose, a pose which won him the favor of his fellow soldiers and officers. Her other works include “Always Faithful,” the United States first official war dog momument that commemorated the 25 dogs who perished in the taking of Guam during World War II. “Always Faithful” is a part of the Museum of the Dog’s collection.

“It has been an honor to create this bronze monument to commemorate Sgt. Stubby,” says Bahary. "His right paw represents his deeds for our country and his left paw represents his friendly and giving nature. His contributions to our military, along with his loyalty and bravery are symbolic of all the wonderful working dogs that protect us and service animals that benefit and enrich our lives today.”

The AKC Museum of the Dog, founded in 1982, was originally housed in The New York Life Building located at 51 Madison Avenue as part of the AKC Headquarters. In 1987, the Museum was moved to West St. Louis County, MO. The Museum made its return to New York City in a new location in February 2019 and houses one of the largest repositories of canine art in the world, including paintings, porcelains, bronzes, trophies and digital displays. The Museum is dedicated to education and preservation of purebred dogs.

The original casting of the sculpture is on permanent display at the “Connecticut Trees of Honor” Memorial at the Veterans Memorial Park In Middletown, CT 

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About the AKC Museum of the Dog

Founded in 1982, The AKC Museum of the Dog is dedicated to the collection, preservation, exhibition, and interpretation of the art, artifacts and literature of the dog for the purposes of education, historical perspective, aesthetic enjoyment and to enhance the appreciation for and knowledge of the significance of the dog and the human/canine relationship. Located in New York City, the Museum is home to several hundred paintings, drawings, watercolors, prints, sculptures, bronzes, and porcelain figurines, a variety of decorative arts objects and interactive displays depicting man's best friend throughout the ages. The AKC Museum of the Dog is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization funded mainly by private and corporate gift donations.

For more information on the AKC Museum of the Dog visit www.Museumofthedog.org

Become a fan of the AKC Museum of the Dog on Facebook at akcmuseumofthedog

 

 

The Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum has announced the development and release of new curriculum and supporting materials based on the museum’s beloved “Owney the Dog.” The announcement took place at the recent Smithsonian Institution’s annual Teachers’ Night held this year at the National Museum of the American Indian with more than 4,000 teachers in attendance. The 60-page full-color curriculum guide features four different units that use the story of Owney the Dog to meet reading, writing, math, social studies, science and art standards. The lessons are designed to provide inspiring and meaningful interdisciplinary experiences in classrooms from kindergarten through third grade.

Owney was a scruffy mutt who became a regular fixture at the Albany, N.Y., post office in 1888. He loved the mail and began to ride with the mailbags on Railway Post Office train cars across the state and then the country. In 1895, Owney even made an around-the-world trip, traveling with mailbags on trains and steamships to Asia and across Europe. The RPO clerks adopted Owney as their unofficial mascot, marking his travels by placing medals and tags from his stops on his collar. He has been preserved and is on display at the National Postal Museum in Washington, D.C.

The curriculum guide features four themed interdisciplinary units on mapping, autobiography, jobs and primary sources. Targeted towards second grade learning standards, these lessons combine to illustrate the life and legacy of Owney the Postal Dog. The curriculum is developed in tandem with Owney-themed technology tools, including an e-book and an augmented reality postage stamp. Also accompanying the curriculum are worksheets, rubrics and companion lessons for students with special education needs.

“Owney stands iconic at the Postal Museum because he is such an engaging entry point to U.S. history” said K. Allison Wickens, director of education at the museum. “In this curriculum, we linked his adventurous story to a myriad of elementary school topics to better serve teachers in the areas of social studies, reading, math, writing, science and the arts. Many teachers have already discovered his powerful presence in their classrooms and with their guidance, we are confident these new lessons will find a place in many more.”

“Kids connect with Owney because dogs are still around nowadays, whereas other aspects of history have changed and advanced over the years—they ‘get’ him,” said Alexandra Roosenburg, learning and technology coordinator for the Primary Campus/Washington International School. “Having a mascot like Owney for the students to interact and identify with when learning about U.S. history and geography makes learning more fun, and thereby worth their while!”

A special online microsite has been created for the Owney curriculum (www.npm.si.edu/owneycurriculum) and resides on the museum’s main website. The site features a downloadable curriculum guide for teachers, which includes units on maps, jobs, tags and stories. Worksheets, rubrics and other resources are also available on the site. The museum makes other teacher resources available on the museum’s recently redesigned website for educators at www.npm.si.edu/educators.

The National Postal Museum is devoted to presenting the colorful and engaging history of the nation’s mail service and showcasing one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of stamps and philatelic material in the world. It is located at 2 Massachusetts Avenue N.E., Washington, D.C., across from Union Station. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (closed Dec. 25). For more information about the Smithsonian, please call (202) 633-1000 or visit the museum website at www.postalmuseum.si.edu.

 

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