Displaying items by tag: Jan Creamer


Animal Defenders International (ADI) President Jan Creameristo be honored at TheWIFTS International Visionary Awards 2017 in recognition of ADI’s life-saving work for animals under her leadership. At an exclusive event in Los Angeles on December 10th, Jan will be presented withTheOtiliaAnimal Advocacy award inaugurated by TippiHedren in 2014.

Jan Creamer, ADI President said “It is an honor to be chosen for this special award. As a species, we are having a devastating effect on the lives of animals and our shared environment, they need our help. Humanity can be a force for good, protecting our planet and the other species who call it home.”

Celebrating its 10th year, The Women’s International Film & Television Showcase and TheWIFTS Foundation is dedicated to increasing awareness of ‘singular women as individuals’.TheWIFTS Foundation selected Angela Merkel as TheWIFTS Woman of The Decade (Society) & Gal GadotWoman of The Decade (Film). Often unrecognized for their passion and integrity in their chosen field,fellow honorees include actressElaine Partnow; Cassini Project Lead Scientist LindaJ Spilker;documentary filmmakers Gina Abatemarco and Taira Akbar; Mayes C. RubeoCostume Designer for Thor: Ragnarok, currently in cinemas worldwide.

A short film showcasing ADI’s work for animals led by Janwill be screened at the awards ceremony,and feature the organization’s latest rescue mission, the epic Operation Spirit of Freedom inwhich more than 100 animals from circuses and the illegal wildlife trade were saved.AsADI assisted the government of Peru with enforcement of a ban on wild animal acts, over 30 lions were flown home to Africa and more than 50 indigenous wild animals, including six different species of monkey and bears, homed in ADI sanctuary facilities in the Amazon. 

Jan co-founded ADI in 1990 with her husband and Vice President Tim Philips, and leadsfrom the front, going toe to toe with circus owners refusing to hand over animals; writing reports;filming in animal laboratories, factory farms, animal dealers, slaughterhouses and circuses; spearheading prosecutions, or addressing national legislators and governments. 

ADI’s highly committed team gathers evidence on industries such as circuses, performing animal trainers, animal laboratories and fur farms. Sustained awareness campaigns have been the catalyst for legislation protecting animals, including ending circus acts in over 40 countries, animal cruelty convictions, the EU ban on use of wild caught primates or their offspring in experiments,bans on cosmetics tests on animals in the UK and Europe and restrictions in over 180 countries on cross-border movements of endangered species in traveling exhibitions.

A major element of this work is the production of short and feature documentaries, television work and online productions. Film and television has a major impact on public understanding of animal and environmental issues and ADI has ensured that the animals are represented in film, television and online productions. The ADI’s large-scale rescue work is showcased in the multi award-winning feature documentary, Lion Ark, produced by Jan Creamer, directed by Tim Phillips. The film tells the story of the rescue of 25 lions from Bolivian circuses, in a joint ADI-Bolivian Government law enforcement operation.

Jan is one of 100 visionaries nominated by the Albert Einstein Foundation to mark 100 years of Einstein’s theory of relativity. The “world’s greatest minds” are presenting their visions of the future in the world’s first 3D-printed bookGenius.  The Genius: 100 Visions of the Future, include director Sir Ridley Scott, former Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, Barbara Streisand, former commander of the international space station Colonel Chris Hadfield, author Salman Rushdie, Nobel laureates, billionaire entrepreneurs and spiritual leaders. The global project honors the life and legacy of Albert Einstein, recognizes living visionaries, and seeks to “inspire the next generation of brilliant minds on the planet.”

Jan and Tim are also recipients of The Drury University Forum on Animal Rights Bob Barker Award for Extraordinary Achievement for Animal Rights, Legendary TV presenter and philanthropist, Bob Barker, a funder of ADI’s work, said,"I am proud to be on ADI's list of donors! In my opinion Animal Defenders International is one of the world's most productive animal protection organizations."

To support Animal Defenders International’s life-saving workwww.ad-international.org/donate

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Animal Defenders International (ADI):Los Angeles – London – Bogota

Ending the suffering of animals in captivity and protecting wild animals and their environments

Active worldwide to end the suffering of animals: animals in entertainment – film, television, advertising, circuses and sport or leisure; animals used for food or fur; protection of wildlife and the environment; trade in animals zoos, pets, entertainment and laboratories. Funding and promotion of advanced scientific methods to replace the use of animals in research. ADI investigates, produces evidence and reports on the scientific, legal and economic issues for each case study, recommending solutions. Education and awareness to public, media and officials. Where ADI’s evidence has been a catalyst for change, we collaborate with governments to conduct large-scale seizures of wild animals in captivity and relocate them to forever homes – back to their natural habitat wherever possible.

ADI government-backed rescues:

Operation Spirit of FreedomOver 100 wild animals, seized from illegal circuses andwildlife trade, rehomed to natural habitats.

In 2016, part of this operation included an airlift of 33 ex-circus lions rescued from circuses in Peru and Colombia, home to Africa.

In 2015, ADI relocated over 40 monkeys of six different species and other animals to their natural habitats in Peru as well as spectacled bear, 25-year-old Cholita, driven three days across the Andes, to her new home at the foot of her natural cloud forest range; a specially built oxygen tent was built to help the elderly bear at high altitudes.

Operation Lion Ark in Bolivia in 2011; ADI assisted officials with the seizure of 25 African lions and relocated them to a sanctuary in the US, this story is told in the feature documentary, Lion Ark (www.lionarkthemovie.com)


For International Primate Day on September 1st 2017, Animal Defenders International is calling for action to end the use of primates in research. Worldwide an estimated 200,000 primates are experimented on each year, with over 70,000 animals used in research across the US,one of the world’s largest users of primates.

Animal Defenders International President Jan Creamer said: The continued use of primates in research is unethical and unnecessary. Harmful to both our closest relatives and to science, governments must end primate tests and facilitate the adoption of modern alternatives without delay.”

Some primates are forcibly removed from the wild and used as breeding machines to supply the industry, or used themselves in tests. In addition to the trauma causedto individuals during the capture process, subsequent confinement, and during procedures until their deaths, this brutal practice harms local populations threatening their survival. 

In Latin America, ADI has exposed the capture of owl monkeys for use in malaria experiments in Colombia. Taken from the trees, these nocturnal primates go from the forest to a barren cage. Our evidence led to a tribunal revoking the experimenter’s permits;although this groundbreaking decision has been overturned. Elsewhere, in Africa and Asia, ADI has revealed dire conditions inside the monkey breeders, who take primates from the wild to maintain their breeding stocks. At the monkey farms, individuals are confined to cages and routinely manhandled. In Florida, already home to a number of monkey breeders, ADI is opposing plans for a facility which seeks to import thousands of primates from outside the US.

Primates are frequently used in brain experiments because of their apparent similarity to humans. However, despite being our closest relatives, non-human primates differ from us in a number of ways, including the immune system. Their use in research therefore can never reliably predict potential human effects. Aspirin for example causes birth defects in monkeys, but is widely used by pregnant women without the same effect.

Such species differences are the fundamental flaw of using animals in research.Each species responds differently to substances, with an animal’s age, diet, sex, even bedding material, also affecting results. As a result animal tests can delay scientific progress and lead to human tragedy.

Just days after being given trial drug BIA 10-2474, the six male volunteers in the highest dose group were hospitalized. Four volunteers displayed neurological symptoms, with at least one losing all his fingers and toes; one of the six volunteers died a week after receiving the dose.  No comparable effect had been seen in monkeys or other animals given high doses of the drug over long periods. Some monkeys were estimated to have received around 75 times the dose given to the volunteers.

In another drug trial tragedy, TGN1412was given to volunteers who then suffered multiple organ failure as the drug triggered an uncontrollable immune response. One volunteer was hospitalized for three months, another had their fingers and toes amputated, and all are likely to suffer permanent damage to their immune systems and live with the danger of developing cancer and lupus.  The drug had been tested extensively in laboratory animals including in doses 500 times greater in monkeys with no drug-related adverse events.

Investment in animal research, predominantly with primates, has been wasteful and unsuccessful. A review has shown that not one of the 85+ candidate AIDS vaccines successfully tested in primates have been effective in human patients.

ADI has documented the suffering of primates for product safety tests at the notorious contract testing facility Huntingdon Life Science (now known as Envigo). Monkeys were strapped down to restrain them while substances were pumped directly into their stomachs, and they suffered a range of debilitating symptoms.

Researchers claim that the use of primates in brain research is ‘necessary’ but sophisticated neuroimaging techniques are available to study human behavior and brain function.Comparing data from human electrical brain activity with data obtained by experimenters using electrodes in restrained monkeys, Professor Furlong and his team at Aston University in the UKhave shown the same level of data can be obtained, directly relevant to human patients.


International Primate Daywas established by Animal Defenders International in 2005 to highlight the threats to and abuses of our closest relatives in the animal kingdom – apes and monkeys – from their use in research and entertainment, for meat and the pet trade.

Around 20,000 primates are imported into the US every year, from countries such as China, Vietnam and Mauritius. ADI USA revealed the hidden suffering of primates bred for research on the tropical Indian Ocean island of Mauritius. Biodia, one of the biggest suppliers of laboratory monkeys in the world, sends thousands to miserable deaths in the USA and worldwide. At this facility we filmed baby monkeys torn from their screaming mothers to be tattooed, pregnant monkeys manhandled and pinned down in terrifying routine procedures and screaming monkeys being swung by their tails.http://www.ad-international.org/animal_experiments/go.php?id=3503

Over 2,000 primates were imported into the UK from Asia and Africa last year. ADI infiltrated Nafovanny in Vietnam filming the macaque monkeys in small, filthy, broken cages – images the huge dealer of monkeys to the USA and UK denied were on their premises – until we proved otherwise. They once roamed free only to be torn from the trees and forced to live for years in these dismal prisons. http://www.ad-international.org/publications/go.php?id=1577 Monkeys filmed Huntingdon Life Sciences were supplied by Nafovanny.http://www.ad-international.org/publications/go.php?id=1576

Non-animal methods

  • There are many alternatives to the use of animals which are more reliable and are based on better science such as,human cell, tissue and organ culture, including 3D models containing different tissues providing a better representation of the actual situation in a living human;databases of known information, and sophisticated analytical techniques.
  • Advancednon-animal methods include the lung-on-a-chip, which mimics the movements of the breathing lung, providing provide low-cost alternatives for drug screening and toxicology tests
  • Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an analytical tool of unprecedented sensitivity. It can be used to study samples from human volunteers given ultra-low, harmless, doses of new drugs (called micro-dosing). Obtaining early data from humans can avoid the unnecessary exposure of volunteers in clinical trials to potentially toxic drugs.  Safe, relevant to the correct species. Emerging technologies like AMS have many advantages, including speeding the development process and improving safety.
  • Other cutting edge methods available to develop and test drugs include computer simulations and modelling, high throughput screening for rapid analysis of compounds for drug discovery, epidemiological studies of human disease, transmission, genetics and environmental factors; fMRI and other imaging techniques.

Species differences

The fundamental flaw of using animals for safety testing, and other forms of research, is species differences. With each species responding differently to substances, primate and other animal tests can never reliably predict potential human effects.

  • Macaque monkeys are frequently used in toxicology testing, but they have specific genes which are vital for drug metabolism (when a drug works through the body). These genes are not found in humans and this is just one of the reasons for differences in drug metabolism between monkeys and humans.
  • The action of drugs also varies; for example Aspirin causes birth defects in monkeys, but is widely used by pregnant women without the same effect.
  • A review showed that none of the 85+ candidate AIDS vaccines successfully tested in primates have been effective in human patients Horses, rats and mice cannot vomit.
  • Morphine drugs are a depressant in rats, dogs, hamsters and other species, but produce tremors and convulsions at comparable doses in mice and cats.
  • The breast cancer drug tamoxifen was designed as an oral contraceptive. It is in rats, but in women it has the opposite effect. It is now used in the treatment of breast cancer, despite causing cancer in rats in some studies.

Animal Defenders International (ADI):Los Angeles – London – Bogota

Ending the suffering of animals in captivity and protecting wild animals and their environments

Active worldwide to end the suffering of animals: animals in entertainment – film, television, advertising, circuses and sport or leisure; animals used for food or fur; protection of wildlife and the environment; trade in animals; zoos, pets, entertainment and laboratories. Funding and promotion of advanced scientific methods to replace the use of animals in research. ADI investigates, produces evidence and reports on the scientific, legal and economic issues for each case study, recommending solutions. Education and awareness to public, media and officials. Where ADI’s evidence has been a catalyst for change, we collaborate with governments to conduct large-scale seizures of wild animals in captivity and relocate them to forever homes – back to their natural habitat wherever possible.

www.ad-international.org


Animal Defenders International (ADI) has welcomed the announcement by Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus to close its animal shows from May, citing declines in ticket sales after earlier announcing a ‘mood shift’ among their consumers .After decades of exposing the cramped, barren conditions with long periods of time tied up and chained with no freedom of movement and a brutal training culture, ADI believes that public opinion has ended the suffering.

Modern audiences now have many entertainment options and do not want to see shows where animals are made to suffer for a few minutes of entertainment.

Jan Creamer, ADI President, said:“After decades of exposing the suffering of animals in circuses behind the scenes, we are pleased to hear that Ringlings has finally bowed to public opinion – it was a mistake for them not to see the trend away from animal shows to human-only performances over a decade ago. Circuses can survive without the animal performances.”

Studies of the use of wild animals in traveling circuses show that in the circumstances of a traveling show, circuses cannot meet the needs of wild animals. Animals are confined in small spaces, deprived of physical and social needs, spending excessive amounts of time tied or chained up, shut in transporters and unable to move around.The abnormal, stereotypical behaviors seen in circus animals, rocking, swaying and pacing, indicate that they are under stress and not coping with their environment. ADI’s video evidence has shown how these animals are forced to perform tricks through physical violence, fear and intimidation.

ADI has led the campaign to expose the suffering and educate the public around the world, providing video evidence, prosecutions and expert reviews. 34 nations have reviewed the evidence and taken action to end traveling circus performances. Across 27states in the US, 66jurisdictions have already decided to either ban or restrict the use of wild animals in traveling shows, due to concerns about public safety and animal welfare.

ADI is supporting RepresentativesRyan Costello (R-PA) andRaul Grijalva(D-AZ), who launched Traveling Exotic Animaland Public Safety ProtectionAct (TEAPSPA) in Congress last November. The congressmen have concluded that ending wild animal use is the only practical approach to deal withpublic safety issues and inspection and oversightproblems repeatedly cited by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG).

Animal Defenders International founders Jan Creamer and Tim Phillips for Extraordinary Achievement for Animal Rights’

DECEMBER 19, 2016 - The Drury University Forum on Animal Rights Bob Barker Award for Extraordinary Achievement for Animal Rights was presented to ADI byPatricia McEachern, Dorothy Jo Barker Endowed Professor of Animal Rights, Director of the Drury University Forum on Animal Rights, and a Fellow with the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics.

Legendary TV host and philanthropist Bob Barker is an alumnus of Drury University, funds the Animal Rights Forum and has given substantial support to the work of ADI.

Professor McEachern cited the ADI founders’ remarkable work exposing animal suffering, running public awareness campaigns, securing animal protection legislation around the world, and leading massive rescue and law enforcement operations.  It is only the third time the award has been made.

The presentation followed a screening of the multi award-winning documentary Lion Ark – the story of the dramatic rescue of 25 lions from circuses by a team led by Creamer and Phillips as they closed down every animal circus in Bolivia.  Bob Barker funded the rescue, the first of its kind, and appears in the feature film during the rescue and addressing Congress.

The pair recently completed a similar mission in Peru enforcing a ban ADI had secured there. Over 100 animals have been rescued as the cruel industry was closed down and over 30 lions were airlifted by ADI to a sanctuary in South Africa where ADI is currently constructing 12 habitats for them to live in.

Last month Creamer and Phillips were in Congress for a screening of Lion Ark at which the introduction of the Traveling Exotic Animal Public Safety & Protection Act (HR6342) was announced.  The Bill has been introduced by Reps Ryan Costello (R-PA-06) and Raul Grijalva (D-AZ) and if passed would end the use of wild animals in traveling circuses.

ADI undercover video evidence of shocking circus abuse in the UK, Europe, USA and South America has been the key to shifting public attitudes to animals in circuses and leading to over 30 countries banning animals in circuses. The evidence has led to convictions for cruelty of leading figures in the circus industry. ADI has also played a lead role in securing bans on cosmetics testing on animals and the use of wild caught monkeys and apes in experiments in Europe.

Bob Barker said: “I am proud to be on ADI’s list of donors! In my opinion Animal Defenders International is one of the world’s most productive animal protection organizations.

Patricia McEachern Endowed Professor of Animal Rights at Drury University said"I cannot begin to express how thrilled and proud I was to present Jan Creamer and Tim Phillips with the third Drury University Forum on Animal Rights Bob Barker Award for Extraordinary Achievements for Animals. Through tireless dedication and hard work, they built ADI into one of the most high profile and successful animal protection groups in the world."

Jan Creamer ADI President: “We are honoured to accept this award.  We have great respect for the work of the Drury University Forum on Animal Rights and it is extra special because Drury Alumnus Bob Barker has been so important to ADI’s work.”

Under the auspices of the Forum, Professor McEachern created and directsDrury University’s innovative Animal Studies minor, one of the first in the United States at its founding, and the team-taught Animal Ethics course, which includes seven professors from various fields, as well as guest speakers.

 


Animal Defenders International (ADI) is active worldwide to end the suffering of captive animals in commercial use: animals used in entertainment – film, television, advertising, circuses and sport or leisure such as hunting or for products such as fur. ADI investigates, produces evidence, and reports on the scientific, legal, and economic issues for each case study, recommending solutions and distributing Information to the media, public, and officials. Where ADI’s evidence has been a catalyst for change, we collaborate with governments to conduct large-scale seizures or rescues of wild animals in captivity and relocate them to forever homes – back to their natural habitat wherever possible.www.ad-international.org

 

Lion Ark:  http://www.lionarkthemovie.com

ANIMAL DEFENDERS INTERNATIONAL EXPOSES BRUTAL MONKEY FARM SENDING ANIMALS TO U.S. LABORATORIES
 
·      Conscious baby monkeys pinned down and tattooed without anesthetic
·      Plans to set up a monkey breeding farm in Labelle, Florida
·      Rising primate imports
 
An undercover investigation by Animal Defenders International (ADI) has filmed horrific treatment of monkeys at Biodia, a Mauritian monkey factory farm that supplies U.S. laboratories and whose monkeys could soon be behind bars in a new Florida breeding farm (1). The ADI findings come just days after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service revealed that monkey imports are on the rise (2). ADI is calling for the U.S. to stop the import of monkeys for experiments or breeding and for the U.S. to join the international move away from monkey experiments.
 
The ADI investigation took place inside Biodia, one of several Mauritian farms breeding long-tailed macaques for experiments. Findings include: Workers swinging screaming monkeys by their tails; distressed baby monkeys torn from the arms of their desperate mothers and tattooed without anesthetic; monkeys injected in the eyelids for TB tests; monkeys restrained and injected in view of other animals; animals captured from the wild and used as breeding machines; barren, crowded cages; animals killed and injured from fighting; stressful separation of mothers and babies; rough handling; monkeys wrenched from cages by their tails; netted animals slammed onto concrete floors; heavily pregnant monkeys manhandled and pinned down.
 
ADI President Jan Creamer said: “The poor U.S. regulations on primate experiments and imports are shameful, allowing unnecessary suffering, fear, pain and distress to intelligent and highly developed animals when alternatives already exist. U.S. primate imports also cause damage to wild populations and the wider environment. As other nations move away from primate research, the US remains in the scientific backwater, clinging to crude, outdated methods instead of advanced technology. This trade is cruel and unjustified.”
 
Monkeys are snatched from the wild on Mauritius to stock breeding farms. Babies are torn from their mothers prematurely so that the mothers can breed again. The young monkeys born on the farms will be locked in tiny boxes & flown 10,000 miles to U.S. laboratories. During the grueling journey some become sick and can even die (3). Air France & China Southern are the last remaining passenger airlines to fly monkeys destined for laboratories.
 
Monkey imports are on the rise with nearly 20,000 primates imported each year (2). The top importers are controversial Covance, Charles River and Shin Nippon Biomedical Laboratories. Mauritius is the second largest monkey supplier after China, supplying 2,842 animals to the U.S. in 2013, with Biodia supplying 300-600 monkeys each year. Imported monkeys are either sent directly to laboratories for cruel experiments, or are used to breed babies who will end up in laboratories. ADI’s investigation has revealed that Biodia’s U.S. trading partner Prelabs has plans to “establish the first Mauritius breeding colony in the U.S.” in Labelle, Florida (1).
 
Over 70,000 monkeys are used in cruel experiments in the U.S. each year (4). These intelligent, social animals are force-fed chemicals, injected with potentially poisonous substances and electrodes are implanted into their brains. They cry out as they are strapped into restraint chairs to immobilize them for cruel experiments; some experience such extreme fear and distress when being restrained that they suffer rectal prolapses. In experiments studied by ADI, monkeys were killed after suffering blocked lungs, trembling, collapse and bleeding. Terrified monkeys awaiting experiments self-mutilated and one animal chewed his finger to the bone (5, 6).
 
Most monkeys are killed at the end of the experiments, but others are forced to endure years of deprivation in barren cages, with nothing to interest them; fights often occur and monkeys under attack cannot escape due to restricted cage space. Many have been seen performing abnormal behaviors associated with psychological damage.
 
International regulatory bodies, scientists and governments around the world are moving away from monkey experiments and adopting the advanced alternatives which are available. The European Union, made up from 28 countries, has ended the use of apes and wild caught monkeys, placed restrictions on monkey experiments and is phasing out the trade in monkeys born to wild caught parents (7).
 
There are a number of alternatives available to replace monkey experiments, including: microdosing, where tiny amounts of new drugs are safely given to human volunteers - significantly more accurate at assessing the way a product is absorbed, broken down and passed through the body than primate models (8); biochips, which mimic human organs on USB-sized chips “providing comprehensive toxicity data very quickly and cheaply” (9), 3-D tissue engineering using human cells; and QSAR which predicts the toxicity of drugs through comparison with similar substances.
 
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Animal Defenders International With offices in Los Angeles, London and Bogotá, Animal Defenders International campaigns to protect animals in entertainment; replacement of animals in experiments; worldwide traffic in endangered species; vegetarianism; factory farming; pollution and conservation. ADI also rescues animals in distress worldwide. ADI-gathered evidence has led to campaigns and legislative action all over the world to protect them. www.ad-international.org