Displaying items by tag: IFAW

Talkin' Pets News

September 23, 2017

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Karen Vance

Producer - Daisey Charlotte

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Pet Expert and Trainer Travis Brorsen will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/23/17 at 5pm EST to discuss his new series My Big Fat Pet Makeover on Animal Planet

Becky Robinson, President and Founder of Alley Cat Allies will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/23/17 at 630pm EST to discuss their organization and their efforts in hurricane relief

 

New York, NY, USA, August 3, 2017—Today, the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and a coalition of other wildlife conservation organizations partnered with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to crush nearly two tons of illegal elephant ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts.

The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry and other decorative items, representative of approximately 100 elephants being killed, were crushed in Central Park while the public gathered to watch, sending a clear message that the state will not tolerate wildlife crime that threatens to wipe out Africa’s dwindling elephant population.

"The State of New York is showing today that they are standing by their commitment to save elephants,” said Jeff Flocken, International Fund for Animal Welfare, North American Regional Director said. “The killing won't stop until the demand for ivory ends, and today's crush sends a statement that New York and all the partners gathered here are working to make the end of ivory markets a reality. Ivory belongs on elephants. Period."

New York was the first, of now seven, states to pass state legislation ending the sale of ivory. Since state legislation was passed, NYDEC enforcement efforts have led to a dramatic reduction in illegal ivory sales – going from being the leading US ivory market to the third.

"These actions make it clear that in New York, we condemn the depraved, violent and illegal industry that is ivory sales," Governor Cuomo said."The ivory crush along with our vigilant enforcement efforts take us one step closer to ending this senseless slaughtering of animals - I urge other leaders across the nation and across the globe to join us is working to protect these magnificent threatened species for generations to come."

It is also clear that an overwhelming majority of Americans feel the same way in opposing ivory sales. Recent polling by IFAW found that nearly 80% of Americans support prohibiting ivory sales in the U.S.

The crush comes as federal and state initiatives are underway to curtail the ivory and other wildlife trade in the U.S. IFAW has played a critical role in passing bans in the top three states for illegal wildlife trade – New York, California and Hawaii – in addition to New Jersey, Washington, Oregon and Nevada and continues to forge ahead fighting for stronger protections for wildlife everywhere.

About IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare)

Founded in 1969, IFAW rescues and protects animals around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on social @action4ifaw and Facebook/IFAW.

 

-Wildlife Groups Seek to Save Species from Silent Extinction-

WASHINGTON (April 19, 2017) — In response to recent scientific consensus on giraffes’ vulnerability to extinction, five wildlife protection groups today petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect Earth’s tallest land animal under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

The legal petition, filed by the Center for Biological Diversity, Humane Society International, The Humane Society of the United States, International Fund for Animal Welfare and Natural Resources Defense Council, seeks “endangered” status for the species. Facing mounting threats from habitat loss, being hunted for their meat, and the international trade in bone carvings and trophies, Africa’s giraffe population has plunged almost 40 percent in the past 30 years and now stands at just over 97,000 individuals.

“Giraffes have been dying off silently for decades, and we have to act quickly before they disappear forever,” said Tanya Sanerib, a senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. “There are now fewer giraffes than elephants in Africa. It’s time for the United States to step up and protect these extraordinary creatures.”

New research recently prompted the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to elevate the threat level of giraffes from ““least concern” to “vulnerable” on the “IUCN Red List of Threatened Species”. Yet giraffes have no protection under U.S. law. Species designated as “endangered” under the U.S. Endangered Species Act receive strict protections, including a ban on most imports and sales. The United States plays a major role in the giraffe trade, importing more than 21,400 bone carving, 3,000 skin pieces and 3,700 hunting trophies over the past decade. Limiting U.S. import and trade will give giraffes important protections.

“Previously, the public was largely unaware that trophy hunters were targeting these majestic animals for trophies and selfies. In the past few years, several gruesome images of trophy hunters next to slain giraffe bodies have caused outrage, bringing this senseless killing to light,” said Masha Kalinina, international trade policy specialist with the wildlife department of Humane Society International. “Currently, no U.S. or international law protects giraffes against overexploitation for trade. It is clearly time to change this. As the largest importer of trophies in the world, the role of the United States in the decline of this species is undeniable, and we must do our part to protect these animals.”

Known for their six-foot-long necks, distinctive patterning and long eyelashes, giraffes have long captured the human imagination. New research recently revealed that giraffes live in complex societies, much like elephants, and have unique physiological traits, like the highest blood pressure of any land mammal.

  

“I was lucky enough to study giraffes in the wild in Kenya many years ago.  Back then, they seemed plentiful, and we all just assumed that it would stay that way,” said Jeff Flocken, North American regional director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW). “Giraffes are facing a crisis.  We cannot let these amazing, regal and unique creatures go extinct – it would be a dramatic loss of diversity and beauty for our planet.  This listing petition is rallying the world to help save the giraffe.”

The IUCN currently recognizes one species of giraffes and nine subspecies: West African, Kordofan, Nubian, reticulated, Masai, Thornicroft’s, Rothchild’s, Angolan and South African. Today’s petition seeks an endangered listing for the whole species.

“I can’t – and won’t – imagine Africa’s landscape without giraffes,” said Elly Pepper, deputy director of NRDC’s wildlife trade initiative. “Losing one of the continent’s iconic species would be an absolute travesty. Giving giraffes Endangered Species Act protections would be a giant step in the fight to save them from extinction.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has 90 days to review and respond to the petition and determine whether a listing may be warranted.


The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 1.2 million members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

Humane Society International and its partner organizations together constitute one of the world’s largest animal protection organizations. For more than 20 25 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide – on the Web at hsi.org.

The Humane Society of the United States is the most effective animal protection organization, as rated by our peers. For more than 60 years, we have celebrated the protection of all animals and confronted all forms of cruelty. We and our affiliates are the nation’s largest provider of hands-on services for animals, caring for more than 150,000 animals each year, and we prevent cruelty to millions more through our advocacy campaigns. Read more about our more than 60 years of transformational change for animals and people. HumaneSociety.org.

Founded in 1969, IFAW rescues and protects animals around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook/IFAW and Twitter @action4ifaw.

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is an international nonprofit environmental organization with more than 2 million members and online activists. Since 1970, our lawyers, scientists, and other environmental specialists have worked to protect the world's natural resources, public health, and the environment. NRDC has offices in New York City, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Bozeman, MT, and Beijing. Visit us atwww.nrdc.org and follow us on Twitter @NRDC.

 

Thousands of big cats are kept as pets or maintained in ill-equipped roadside zoos in the U.S.

WASHINGTON (March 30, 2017) – Big Cat Rescue, Born Free USA, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, The Humane Society of the United States and the Humane Society Legislative Fund applaud U.S. Representatives Jeff Denham (R-CA), Walter Jones (R-NC), and Niki Tsongas (D-MA) for introducing the Big Cat Public Safety Act (H.R. 1818). The bill would advance animal welfare and protect public safety by prohibiting possession and breeding of tigers, lions, leopards and other big cat species by private individuals and unqualified exhibitors.

This bill would strengthen the Captive Wildlife Safety Act, the existing federal law passed unanimously in 2003, by closing the loopholes that allow private possession of big cats by unqualified individuals. Existing owners that do not qualify for an exemption may keep the big cats they currently possess so long as they notify the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The bill provides for reasonable exemptions for wildlife sanctuaries and exhibitors licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture that meet basic standards intended to protect the public and the animals.

According to Kate Dylewsky, program associate at Born Free USA, “This common sense and narrowly-crafted bill is an urgently-needed solution to the problem of big cats kept in unsafe and abusive situations around the country. Thousands of big cats are currently owned as pets or maintained in ill-equipped roadside zoos. These poorly regulated facilities — with animals kept in basements, cement pits, or in backyards — pose a severe risk to the safety of people in surrounding communities, as well as the welfare of the cats themselves.”

Nicole Paquette, vice president of wildlife for The Humane Society of the United States, said, “Tigers, lions, and other big cats should not be kept in peoples’ homes or backyards. In order to protect the public, there needs to be strong oversight of these private owners who, in most cases, do not have the expertise needed to properly care for these animals in captivity. Some states have little to no laws regarding the keeping of big cats and it’s time for a uniform federal law that ends this dangerous industry once and for all.”

Carson Barylak, campaigns officer at the International Fund for Animal Welfare, noted that “there are now more tigers in private hands in the U.S. than remain in the wild, and nearly all of them are denied proper veterinary care, nutrition and enrichment.” Moreover, “law enforcement officers and other first responders — including those who have encountered these deadly animals in the course of their work — have joined animal rescue and conservation advocates in supporting the Big Cat Public Safety Act. Emergency officials and the communities that they protect, much like the big cats themselves, should not be placed in harm’s way by a private owner’s irresponsible decision to keep big cats.”

"Relying on accredited sanctuaries to take in unwanted and usually neglected big cats is not a viable solution," said Carole Baskin, founder and CEO of Big Cat Rescue. "When individuals foolishly acquire big cats as pets or exploit them in entertainment businesses, the cats often suffer in deplorable conditions with inadequate nutrition and veterinary care for many years. Then when owners realize they are not equipped to take care of a big cat or no longer want them, the burden to house and care for these big cats falls upon sanctuaries. This is not the solution; it does not address the inhumane treatment of the cats nor the public safety issues."

Facts:

  • There have been more than 700 dangerous incidents in the U.S. involving tigers, lions, and cougars, including hundreds of human injuries, maulings and deaths. In many cases, the animals were shot and killed, often by first responders who are not trained to deal with these situations. The most dramatic example was an October 2011 incident in Zanesville, Ohio, in which a private exotic animal owner released 38 big cats near a populated area, requiring law enforcement to kill the cats — and risk their own lives — for the sake of public safety.
  • Big cats are wild animals and suffer when kept as pets. They are often purchased as babies, and private owners typically are not able to manage them once they’re fully grown. Consequently, the animals are frequently left to languish in grossly substandard conditions and often deprived of sufficient space, adequate veterinary care, a nutritious diet and enrichment.
  • It is standard procedure for some roadside zoos to separate babies from their mothers so they can charge the public to pet and play with the cubs. This is an inhumane and unhealthy practice that can cause lifelong physical and psychological problems — or even death — for the cubs. Young cats, who very quickly outgrow their usefulness in the cub handling industry, end up warehoused at substandard “zoos,” sold into the exotic pet trade or possibly even killed and sold for parts — all while a vicious cycle of constant breeding churns out more babies to be exploited.

Big Cat Rescue is one of the largest accredited sanctuaries in the world devoted to rescuing and providing a permanent home for abused and abandoned exotic cats. Located in Tampa, Fla., Big Cat Rescue is home to approximately 80 exotic cats, most of whom were abandoned by owners who mistakenly thought they made good pets, abused, seized by authorities, orphaned or retired from performing acts. The sanctuary’s dual mission is to provide the best possible home for the cats in our care and to educate the public about the plight of big cats in captivity and in the wild. www.BigCatRescue.org

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic "pets," trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to America the message of "compassionate conservation": the vision of the U.K.-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free's mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

The Humane Society Legislative Fund is a social welfare organization incorporated under section 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code and formed in 2004 as a separate lobbying affiliate of The Humane Society of the United States. The HSLF works to pass animal protection laws at the state and federal level, to educate the public about animal protection issues, and to support humane candidates for office. On the web at hslf.org.

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization, rated most effective by our peers. For 60 years, we have celebrated the protection of all animals and confronted all forms of cruelty. We are the nation’s largest provider of hands-on services for animals, caring for more than 100,000 animals each year, and we prevent cruelty to millions more through our advocacy campaigns. Read more about our 60 years of transformational change for animals and people. HumaneSociety.org

IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare): Founded in 1969, IFAW rescues and protects animals around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on social @action4ifaw and Facebook/IFAW.

Washington, D.C. (December 21, 2016) – As the Obama Administration prepares to hand over the reins of the executive branch to President-elect Donald Trump, the Endangered Species Coalition released on Wednesday a “Top Ten” list of imperiled species in need of strong conservation measures. The report, “Removing the Walls to Recovery: Top 10 Species Priorities for a New Administration,” highlights some of the most significant threats to vanishing wildlife, including the African elephant, and identifies important actions the next administration could take to slow their rates of extinction.

The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Humane Society International (HSI) nominated the African elephant to the list. African elephant populations have declined 60 percent since 1978, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed them as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The steep decline is largely a result of habitat loss, poaching, commercial exploitation, trophy hunting, human-elephant conflict, regional conflict and instability and climate change. Between 2010 and 2012 alone, 100,000 were killed for their tusks.

IFAW and HSI have worked in concert with other wildlife groups to provide the African elephant with more protections at the international, federal and state levels, including petitioning to list them as endangered under the ESA – which resulted in a positive 90-day finding earlier this year, meaning the government believes an endangered listing may be warranted—as well as advocating for state ivory bans in New York, New Jersey, California, Washington, Oregon and Hawaii.

IFAW and HSI nominated the African elephant for the report because the species is at a tipping point,’ said Peter LaFontaine, Campaigns Manager, IFAW. “If we can build on the achievements of the past several years, we can pull it back from the brink – but if we fail to do so, we may be signing a warrant for extinction from the wild.”

Iris Ho, Wildlife Program Manager for Humane Society International, said: “The survival of the African elephant in the wild is in our hands. The responsibility to safeguard the species from poaching and wildlife trafficking is as much upon our generation as upon the United States, a global conservation leader. It's an ecological responsibility that should transcend national borders, cultures and political affiliations. We urge the incoming Trump administration and elected officials to join us in saving the last remaining African elephants.”

During the current administration, substantial progress has been made to further protect elephants by strengthening domestic U.S. ivory regulations, which set a high global standard and help prevent the United States from being a trafficking hub. This report urges the incoming administration to continue to enforce these regulations, resist congressional action to weaken these rules, work with other countries to curb trafficking and provide vital funding for USFWS, USAID and other agencies to engage in these efforts.

The remaining species featured in the Endangered Species Coalition’s report include the Jaguar, Yellow-faced Bee, Greater Sage-Grouse, Snake River Salmon, Joshua Tree, Elkhorn Coral, Bald Cypress, Vaquita and Wolves.

Endangered Species Coalition member groups nominated wildlife species for the report. A committee of distinguished scientists reviewed the nominations and decided which species should be included in the final report. The full report, along with links to photos and additional species information, can be viewed and downloaded from the website, http://removingthewallstorecovery.org.

The Endangered Species Coalition produces a “Top 10” report annually, focusing on a different theme each year. Previous years’ reports are also available on the Coalition’s website.

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About IFAW

Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About Humane Society International

Humane Society International and its partner organizations together constitute one of the world’s largest animal protection organizations. For more than 25 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide – on the Web at hsi.org.

 

Washington, D.C. (November 9, 2016) – Jeffrey Flocken, North American Regional Director, International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), issued the following statement regarding the passage of the Wildlife Trafficking Prevention Act (Measure 100) in Oregon, which prohibits the sale of parts and products of 12 types of imperiled wildlife in the state:

“Oregon followed the right trail passing the Wildlife Trafficking Prevention Act. Elephants, rhinos and many other species are facing unprecedented poaching levels that are driving them towards extinction. These animals are being viciously killed to supply markets with products that no one needs or should deem to be of value.

By prohibiting the sale of these wildlife products, Oregon completes the 1,300-mile bulwark of West coast states against wildlife traffickers. Its neighbors to the north and south, California and Washington, both passed legislation last year to restrict the trade of endangered species products within their borders. Hawaii passed a similar ban earlier this year.

The more states that enact this kind of legislation, the fewer places wildlife can be smuggled and sold. The fewer places wildlife parts are sold, the less consumer demand is triggered, which in turn reduces poaching.

Thank you to the groups we worked with in Oregon and the hundreds of volunteers who made this possible.”

IFAW worked with Save Endangered Animals Oregon, a coalition of animal conservation groups both large and small to get Measure 100 on the ballot and passed by Oregon citizens. To learn more about IFAW’s efforts to stop wildlife trafficking, please visit: http://www.ifaw.org/united-states/our-work/fighting-wildlife-trade 

About IFAW (the International Fund for Animal Welfare)

Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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Washington, D.C. (August 17, 2016) – Jeff Flocken, North American Regional Director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), issued the following statement in response to the killing of a giraffe and zebra in South Africa by a 12-year old American trophy hunter:

“It’s sad any time that an imperiled animal like a giraffe is killed for fun, regardless of who does it.  Giraffes are in serious decline across Africa—it is estimated that their populations have dropped by 40 percent in the last 15 years. The last thing they need is to be killed for anyone’s enjoyment. 

All the negative on-line energy focused on this should not be directed at any individual, particularly a minor. We know that the problem is so much larger than any one of these isolated incidents.  These kills were just two of thousands and thousands of animals legally killed for sport annually.  This includes an approximate 200,000 animals from threatened species killed for trophies over the last decade.

Trophy hunters need to stop taking the lives of wildlife simply for fun.  We are in 2016 and wild animals are facing a multitude of threats to their existence.  Killing them for sport just isn’t right.”

 

About IFAW (the International Fund for Animal Welfare)

Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

U.S. is Largest Importer of Hunting Trophies By Far

Washington, D.C. (June 14, 2016) – Today the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) released Killing For Trophies: An Analysis of Global Trophy Hunting Trade. The new report provides an in-depth look at the scope and scale of trophy hunting trade and isolates the largest importers of animal trophies worldwide.  

The result of a comprehensive analysis of the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Trade Database, the report found that as many as 1.7 million hunting trophies may have been traded between nations between 2004 and 2014, with at least 200,000 of that being made up of categories of species, also known as taxa, that are considered threatened.

“The trophy hunting industry is driven by demand, and sadly, demand for animal trophies is prevalent worldwide,” said Jeff Flocken, North American Regional Director, IFAW. “Even in the face of extinction, imperiled species are still being hunted every day in order to serve as the centerpiece of someone’s décor. It is unconscionable in this modern day when species are under so many threats to survive.”

IFAW’s research found that 107 different nations (comprised of 104 importing nations and 106 exporting nations) participated in trophy hunting between 2004 and 2014, with the top twenty countries responsible for 97 percent of trophy imports. The United States accounted for a staggering 71 percent of the import demand, or about 15 times more than the next highest nation on the list—Germany and Spain (both 5 percent).

Of the top 20 importing countries, most of the trophies were killed and imported from Canada (35 percent), South Africa (23 percent) and Namibia (11 percent), with the largest number of threatened taxa coming from Canada to the U.S., followed by African nations to the U.S.

The analysis further revealed that three of the four threatened taxa from the highly-prized species known as the “Africa Big Five” (African elephant, African leopard, and African lion) are among the top six most traded of imperiled taxa. African lions in particular had the strongest statistically significant increase of trophy hunting trade since 2004, with at least 11,000 lion trophies being traded worldwide from 2004 to 2013.  Other big five species also remain popular with trophy hunters, with over 10,000 elephant trophies and over 10,000 leopard trophies being legally traded worldwide between 2004 and 2014. Like African lions, elephant trophy hunting trade has increased since 2004.

To view the full report, please visit: http://www.ifaw.org/united-states/resource-centre/killing-trophies-analysis-global-trophy-hunting-trade

About IFAW

Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Fleetwood Mac drummer Mick Fleetwood and the Drum Workshop snare drum “Rumours” created in his honor.

Music legend and wildlife advocate Mick Fleetwood has chosen the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) as the benefiting charity of the Drum Workshop snare drum “Rumours,” created in his honor and named after Fleetwood Mac’s most iconic album. “Rumours” is a limited edition collection (only 250 produced) handmade with maple and custom gold hardware and created with input from the artist himself. The album’s cover art is recreated in hand-inlaid exotic woods.

Fleetwood, who is a long-time Hawaii resident and business owner in Maui, worked with IFAW to support passage of a state bill that cracks down on trafficking of ivory and other wildlife products from imperiled species. He joined other Hawaii-based musicians, actors and business leaders in signing an open letter in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser encouraging residents to support this legislation. In addition, Mick hosted an IFAW event at his restaurant, “Fleetwood’s on Front Street,” that was attended by notable Hawaii residents and wildlife supporters who wanted to learn about the issue and join the effort. Mick also submitted testimony to the House Committee on Water and Land Committee and the House Committee on Judiciary, urging lawmakers to protect wildlife and make Hawaii a leader in global conservation efforts.

In early May, the Hawaii legislature passed this landmark legislation, making it the fifth state in the nation to prioritize endangered species over trade in unnecessary wildlife products. Elephants, rhinos, tigers, and countless other species face unprecedented threats – from habitat loss to rampant poaching – but this successful fight shows that we can make a difference.

We sincerely thank Mick for his passionate support of this campaign and his leadership in raising awareness and funds for IFAW’s work to protect imperiled wildlife.

The Rumours snare drum can be purchased here.

Washington, D.C. (July 28, 2015) – Jeff Flocken, North American Regional Director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), issued the following statement in response to the death of Cecil the Lion, who was illegally killed for sport in Zimbabwe:

“We are extremely saddened by the news of Cecil the Lion being illegally killed for sport—not only from an animal welfare perspective, but also for conservation reasons.  African lion populations have declined sharply, dropping nearly 60 percent in the last three decades. With as few as 32,000 African lions remaining in the wild, individuals matter for conserving the species.  Even worse, the killing of a dominant male in a pride, like Cecil, can have a ripple effect and result in the deaths of other males, young cubs and females in that pride. 

“And as troubling as it is, the rarer these trophy hunted animals become, the more hunters are willing to pay to kill them—like the American hunter, who recently paid $350,000 to kill a critically endangered black rhino in Namibia.”

“Actions, like these, are quickly pushing imperiled species toward extinction. So long as a value continues to be placed on these animals, where they are worth more dead than alive, the future of majestic creatures like elephants, lions, tigers and rhinos will remain in grave jeopardy.”

About IFAW (the International Fund for Animal Welfare)

Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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