Displaying items by tag: Grant


Florida Blue grant to support healthy marine ecosystems
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Tampa, FL – The Florida Aquarium will be able to expand its animal rescue and rehabilitation efforts thanks to a grant from Florida Blue. The grant will support The Florida Aquarium’s Animal Response Team, which focuses on protecting and restoring endangered marine life to create a healthier, natural environment and healthy planet.

“Our mission is to help people and communities achieve better health, and a healthy environment and ecosystem are essential to the overall health of our Florida communities,” said David Pizzo, Florida Blue market president for west Florida. “The health of key ocean species has a substantial impact on the overall health of our environment, which is why Florida Blue is proud to support the important work of The Florida Aquarium’s Animal Response Team.”

“The generous support of companies like Florida Blue is crucial to The Florida Aquarium’s efforts to protect and restore our blue planet,” said Roger Germann, The Florida Aquarium President and CEO. “We are grateful to have a wonderful partner in Florida Blue that believes in the importance of the health of our local environment and ecosystem and understands how it can impact human health and therefore is willing to invest in conservation programs like those here at the Aquarium.” 

Florida Blue is providing a two-year, $250,000 grant to the Aquarium to support the expansion of its marine rescue and rehabilitation efforts.

Million Cat Challenge Receives $2.5 Million Grant to Continue Revolutionizing Animal Sheltering, Thanks to Maddie

One Million Cats Saved One Year Early

 
PLEASANTON, Calif., June 26, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Maddie's Fund®, a national family foundation established by Dave and Cheryl Duffield to revolutionize the status and well-being of companion animals, is granting $2,580,741 to support the Million Cat Challenge as it expands to into its next phase of animal lifesaving in shelters across North America.
The Million Cat Challenge, a campaign to save the lives of one million shelter cats, met its goal one year early. In addition to continuing the momentum that helped achieve the initial goal, the next stage of the Million Cat Challenge will focus on communities where cats are still at risk, and helping to make lifesaving the norm across shelters through its five key initiatives.
“The Challenge has revolutionized animal sheltering for cats,” said Mary Ippoliti-Smith, Maddie’s Fund Executive Leadership Team. “Moving forward, initiatives such as making adoptions easier and managing the admission of cats to match the shelter’s ability to assure humane care will become everyday practices for all animals in shelters.”
“One of the great benefits of The Million Cat Challenge was that it taught us how much progress was truly possible. That inspires us to aim even higher, not just for cats but for all animals in shelters,” said Challenge co-founder Dr. Kate Hurley of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program. “Thanks to Maddie, we look forward to saving even more lives during the next phase.”

About Maddie's Fund
Maddie's Fund® is a family foundation created in 1994 by Workday® co-founder Dave Duffield and his wife, Cheryl, who have endowed the Foundation with more than $300 million. Since then, the Foundation has awarded more than $208.9 million in grants toward increased community lifesaving, shelter medicine education, and pet adoptions across the U.S. The Duffields named Maddie's Fund after their Miniature Schnauzer Maddie, who always made them laugh and gave them much joy. Maddie was with Dave and Cheryl for ten years and continues to inspire them today.
Maddie's Fund is the fulfillment of a promise to an inspirational dog, investing its resources to create a no-kill nation where every dog and cat is guaranteed a healthy home or habitat. #ThanksToMaddie.

 

(Washington, D.C.) October 25, 2016 The Human Animal Bond Research Initiative (HABRI) announced today it has awarded a $44,000 grant to Duke University School of Medicine’s Division of Pediatric Cardiology for a new research study titled Impact of Animal Assisted Therapy on Quality, Completeness, and Patient and Parental Satisfaction in Children Undergoing Clinical Echocardiography.

This study will examine the influence of Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) on young children undergoing an echocardiogram. It is hypothesized that children will have a more complete and higher quality echocardiogram in the presence of therapy dogs. In addition, parents are expected to report higher visit satisfaction scores and greater exam comfort for their children. 

“Echocardiography is an effective way to use ultrasound to ‘see’ inside the heart, and while taking the pictures is non-invasive, it can still be a scary procedure for young children,” said the study’s principal investigator, Dr. Piers C.A. Barker, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Duke University School of Medicine. “Typically, we must sedate children who have trouble holding still so that we can get adequate pictures. This study aims to evaluate whether animal-assisted therapy could serve as an effective alternative technique to comfort the children and put them at ease, potentially resulting in more complete echocardiograms, higher quality images, and avoidance of sedation drugs.”

“We know from previous scientific research that animal-assisted therapy is effective in alleviating anxiety in hospital patients,” said co-investigator, Margaret Gruen, DVM, PhD, DACVB of Duke. “This is one of the first studies to focus on the potential of animal-assisted therapy to impact a clinical outcome. If results are successful, this study could potentially add non-pharmacologic, low-cost options to improve diagnostic quality for children having medical imaging procedures and could encourage broader use of therapy dogs in other pediatric cardiology settings.” 

The two-and-a-half-year project is a collaboration between Duke’s Division of Pediatric Cardiology and the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. The team has partnered with the Pets@Duke program, which certifies therapy dogs to interact with patients throughout Duke University Health System hospitals. 

The study will examine 150 children between the ages of 1 and 5 and randomly assign them to a group: canine-assisted therapy only; canine-assisted therapy plus standard distraction techniques; and standard distraction techniques only. Dr. Barker – along with co-investigators Bruce W. Keene, DVM, MSc, DACVIM of NC State, Michael J. Campbell, MD of Duke and Margaret Gruen, DVM, PhD, DACVB of Duke – will evaluate quality, completeness and parental satisfaction of echocardiograms among the three groups, as well as reduction of stress or fear among the children.

The HABRI Foundation maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information about the HABRI Foundation, please visit www.habri.org.

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (May 4, 2016) –  The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat, and cure diseases in all dogs, marks Pet Cancer Awareness Month by providing free educational resources and research updates on canine cancer to dog lovers throughout the world.

“During the month of May, CHF focuses on providing news and information to help educate dog owners about the cutting-edge research and improved treatment options in the field of canine cancer, while also emphasizing the continued need for further research,” said Dr. Diane Brown, chief executive officer of CHF.

Canine cancer treatment options continue to improve and many have a One Health benefit, providing insight and better treatment options not only for our dogs, but for their human companions as well. For example, CHF has awarded a grant to Dr. Rowan J. Milner at the University of Florida to study vaccine development against osteosarcoma, an aggressive form of bone cancer that is diagnosed in nearly 10,000 dogs per year and also afflicts children.

CHF recently learned of Mya, a German Shorthaired Pointer who was diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Mya received radiation and chemotherapy treatments that were originally developed to treat the same disease in children. Mya’s inspirational story speaks to the importance of canine cancer research and the benefits it holds for both species.

Since 1995 CHF has funded over $11.5 million in canine cancer research. Over 200 research grants have provided breakthroughs in treatment options and diagnoses, and have helped scientists study cancer at the cellular level, allowing veterinarians to diagnose cancer earlier and treat it more effectively.  

Dog owners and dog lovers can directly impact the future of canine cancer research by making a donation to CHF. New or lapsed donors who have not given to CHF since December 31, 2013 will have their contributions matched dollar for dollar by the American Kennel Club (up to $500,000).

Visit www.akcchf.org/caninecancer to access free resources and to learn more about canine cancer.

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing, treating, and curing diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce the funding of an exciting grant which aims to better understand and prevent hemangiosarcoma, an aggressive form of cancer in dogs. Three groups whose dogs have been affected by this cruel disease --  the American Boxer Charitable Foundation, the Golden Retriever Foundation, and the Portuguese Water Dog Foundation -- are taking a unique, collaborative stand against cancer by pledging $432,000 to support this research effort.

Dr. Jaime Modiano, VMD, PhD, professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine and the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota will be leading a team of researchers on this project entitled, “A Novel Approach for Prevention of Canine Hemangiosarcoma,” which aims to pair two novel technologies consisting of a patented test to detect hemangiosarcoma cells in blood samples, and a treatment that attacks the cells that establish and maintain the disease.

According to Dr. Modiano, “Hemangiosarcoma is the cause of death for an estimated one out of every five Golden Retrievers in the United States. Portuguese Water Dogs and Boxers also have an especially high risk for this disease which is devastating for all dogs.” Dr. Modiano continues, “Hemangiosarcoma is incurable partly because the cancer is detected at a very advanced stage when it is resistant to conventional therapies. Thus, an unconventional approach to improve outcomes for hemangiosarcoma patients will involve effective methods for early detection and for disease prevention.”

“The Golden Retriever Foundation is honored to partner with the American Boxer Charitable Foundation and Portuguese Water Dog Foundation to magnify the effectiveness of all of our donors’ contributions through the power of collaboration, said Collette Jaynes, president, Golden Retriever Foundation. “We are particularly proud to continue our commitment to making meaningful strides against hemangiosarcoma.”This project will create tools to guide further development, licensing, and deployment of new paired technologies against cancer, specifically hemangiosarcoma, with an ultimate goal for disease prevention in all dogs.

“The Portuguese Water Dog Foundation (PWDF) is honored to be included in this unprecedented collaboration. The PWDF played a role in supporting Dr. Modiano’s 2005 research to develop a diagnostic test to detect hemangiosarcoma, and we are happy and proud to help take this research to the next level,” said Carol Mattingley, PWDF president.

“This novel approach to a particularly aggressive form of cancer in dogs has the potential to eventually change the landscape and improve outcomes for all dogs diagnosed with this terrible disease,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF chief scientific officer. “The unprecedented collaboration between these three breed club foundations and their dedication to canine health has really driven this project forward – together they are making a significant difference for all dogs.”

CHF supports the funding of this effort and will oversee administration of funds and scientific progress.

For more information about this grant, or to learn about the work of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, visit www.akcchf.org.

Funds assisted displaced animals rescued during Hurricane Sandy

West Cornwall, Conn.—Little Guild of St. Francis for the Welfare of Animals has been awarded $12,000 in grant funding from the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) to provide medical care and treatment for animals displaced during Hurricane Sandy.

“The Little Guild is very grateful for the assistance from the ASPCA for the medical needs of the animals we rescued from Hurricane Sandy,” said Denise Cohn, executive director of Little Guild of St. Francis for the Welfare of Animals. “It is a huge help in ensuring we can provide the best medical care possible for the many animals that need it.”

“The ASPCA is well aware of the challenges animal shelters face in the wake of a natural disaster,” added Tim Rickey, vice president for the ASPCA Field Investigations and Response team. “We commend groups such as the Little Guild of St. Francis for stepping up to assist other shelters in need during these difficult times. We hope that our grant will enable them to provide medical care and treatment for displaced Sandy animals so they can be made available for adoption.”

Following Hurricane Sandy, Little Guild of St. Francis for the Welfare of Animals traveled to Philipe, W.Va. to assist Animal Friends of Barbour County, which was badly damaged and left without power, heat and water. Little Guild took 65 dogs and 23 cats, many of which required medical attention including spay or neuter surgeries.

The ASPCA is commonly called upon by state and municipal governments and other animal welfare agencies to lend expertise during large-scale animal rescue operations. Every year, the ASPCA assists thousands of animals in communities throughout the U.S. that were severely affected by tornadoes, flooding and storms. During Hurricane Sandy, the ASPCA assisted nearly 61,000 animals through field rescue, sheltering, pet supply distribution and mobile wellness clinics in New York and New Jersey. The ASPCA also responded to the 2011 tornado in Joplin, Mo., Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in 2008, and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005.

For information on disaster preparedness and safety tips from the ASPCA, please click here.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

About Little Guild of Saint Francis
Founded in 1960, the Little Guild of Saint Francis is a 501 (c)(3) public charity for the welfare of animals. The mission of the Little Guild is to find adoptive homes for abandoned or distressed canines and felines while providing shelter and care until those homes are found. For more information please visit www.littleguild.org, “like” us on Facebook or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Funds will help Florida facility rehabilitate 14 neglected horses

 

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced that it has awarded a grant of $7,000 to the Hidden Springs Horse Rescue (HSHR) in Marianna, Fla., which will be used to fund the rehabilitation of 14 neglected horses seized by local law enforcement last January. The grant funding will help cover the cost of hay, feed, and vaccinations, as well as veterinary, dental, and farrier care for the horses while HSHR works to restore their health and place them into permanent homes.

“We were saddened to hear about the suffering these horses had to endure,” said Jacque Schultz, senior director of the ASPCA Equine Fund. “The ASPCA has an extensive history of helping equines around the country, and we’re glad we were able to assist the HSHR in nursing these neglected horses back to health and finding them loving homes.”

“The grant that HSHR received from the ASPCA has been instrumental in allowing us to provide food and veterinary care for a large number of horses,” said Melanie L. Higdon, executive director of HSHR. “Additionally, the grant has enabled us to continue our operations and rescue more horses that are in need. Many of the rescued horses have been returned to their former majestic forms, and none of this would have been possible without the assistance from the ASPCA Equine Fund.”

Last year, the ASPCA Equine Fund awarded nearly $1.5 million in grant funding to 165 non-profit equine welfare organizations in 38 states whose focus and expertise is concentrated on reducing the suffering of equines who have lost their homes or been cruelly treated.

HSHR is a non-profit equine rescue that assists law enforcement and animal control by taking in abused, neglected, and abandoned horses. The organization provides veterinary care and places the horses into loving, permanent homes through their adoption program. For more information about HSHR, please visit www.FloridaHorseRescue.com.

 

 

 

About the ASPCA®

Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

About Hidden Springs Horse Rescue

Hidden Springs Horse Rescue (HSHR) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to saving and improving the lives of horses. HSHR takes in and cares for a large number of rescued horses with the help of a crew of wonderful volunteers. The majority of the funds required to operate the program are raised through public support, there is no government funding for horse rescue services. For more information about the organization’s work, please visit www.FloridaHorseRescue.com.

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Funding will help provide low-cost spay/neuter to pet owners
in need of assistance


NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced it will provide more than $340,000 to 15 local municipal shelters, animal control agencies and non-profits throughout the state of New York to create and expand low-cost spay/neuter programs.

The following grant recipients received funding for low-cost spay/neuter programs:

  • Central New York Spay Neuter Assistance Program (CNY SNAP), Cortland
  • Columbia-Greene Humane Society, Inc., Hudson
  • Cortland Community SPCA, Cortland
  • Dutchess County SPCA Inc., Hyde Park
  • Hornell Area Humane Society, Hornell
  • Humane Society of Livingston County, Avon
  • Humane Society of Schuyler County, Inc., Montour Falls
  • Mohawk Hudson Humane Society, Menands
  • New Rochelle Humane Society, New Rochelle
  • Paradise Garden Animal Haven, Woodhull
  • Shelter Outreach Services (SOS), Ithaca
  • Spay/Neuter/Now, Ltd., Hammond
  • Spring Farm Center Alternative Research Education Sanctuary, Clinton
  • Tompkins County SPCA, Ithaca
  • Wanderers' Rest Humane Association, Canastota

"By providing grants that specifically fund low-cost spay/neuter projects, the ASPCA hopes to directly impact the number of homeless animals in New York, as well as help pet owners who are most in need of assistance,” said Michael Barrett, vice president of grants management for the ASPCA. “We encourage local animal shelters to apply for these grants, which will not only help expand their spay/neuter efforts, but could greatly impact their work to eradicate animal homelessness in their communities.”

Increased spay/neuter programs can help to prevent litters of homeless kittens and puppies from entering the sheltering system, in addition to reducing the number of free-roaming cats in communities when Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) is practiced. Spaying and neutering not only helps reduce animal homelessness but has numerous behavioral and health benefits for dogs and cats as well.

The grants are administered through the New York State Animal Population Control Program (APCP), a low-cost spay/neuter granting program managed by the ASPCA on behalf of the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Funds are garnered from pet licensing fees collected by towns, which are then sent to the state. Quarterly, the state sends these funds to the ASPCA to be granted out specifically toward low-cost spay/neuter programming. The ASPCA is still accepting applications, and organizations can apply for these grants by visiting the ASPCA’s grants website.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. One million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org.

To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to http://www.twitter.com/aspca.


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Doris Day Animal Foundation Grant for World Spay Day Helps Subsidize Spay/Neuter Costs

WASHINGTON (Feb. 17, 2012)— In celebration of World Spay Day, The Humane Society of the United States’ Pets for Life program announced it will work with local partners to provide $75,000 in free pet spay/neuter services in underserved communities. The services will be provided throughout February as a result of a generous World Spay Day grant to The HSUS from the Doris Day Animal Foundation.

“Thanks to the Doris Day Animal Foundation, we are able to do even more this month to extend the critical services provided by our local animal welfare partners to even more people and pets who need them most,” said Cory Smith, senior director for Pets for Life. “This funding will help us build more humane communities and improve overall companion animal health and welfare by providing life-changing assistance for pet owners who cannot afford or access to these essential services.”

Pets for Life is an ongoing program that extends the reach of animal welfare services, resources and information to people and pets in underserved communities. In addition to funding the services, The HSUS’ PFL program helps communities effectively target resources to pet owners who would otherwise be overlooked. PFL also helps to provide transportation when needed, and conducts in-depth follow up to ensure that each scheduled spay/neuter appointment is positive and successful.

The following is a list of Spay/Neuter events being sponsored by Pets for Life:

Atlanta:

  • The HSUS’ Pets for Life Atlanta program and LifeLine Animal Project are holding a “Free Fix for Pits” campaign throughout February to provide free spay/neuter services for 100 pit bull type dogs from Fulton, DeKalb, and Clayton counties. PFL Atlanta will also sponsor $4000 worth of cat sterilizations for low-income owners and feral cats at Furkids throughout February.

Chicago:

  • Pets for Life Chicago and PAWS Chicago’s Lurie Clinic will sponsor spay/neuter surgeries throughout February for pit bull type dogs and other animals from underserved communities.
  • On Feb. 28 PFL Chicago will host a World Spay Day celebration at PAWS Chicago’s Lurie Clinic where they will provide spay/neuter information and offer free surgeries for animals from select zip codes.
  • PFL Chicago will sponsor spay/neuter surgeries at The Anti-Cruelty Society for underserved pet owners from the Pullman, Pilsen and North Lawndale communities. These owners signed up for the surgeries at vaccine clinics in their communities, done in collaboration with Chicago Animal Care & Control, the ASPCA, Safe Humane Chicago, PAWS Chicago and the Anti-Cruelty Society, as well as the alderman in each of the communities.
  • PFL Chicago and Chicagoland Bully Breed Rescue will offer free spay/neuter surgeries at the Woodlawn Animal Hospital in South Side Chicago for persons who cannot otherwise afford the service for their pets. 

Los Angeles:

  • Pets for Life Los Angeles, the Found Animals Foundation and Spay LA will host a one-day mobile free spay/neuter, vaccination and microchip clinic in Boyle Heights on Feb. 26.
  • PFL Los Angeles will also sponsor vaccines and sterilization surgeries at the Spay Neuter Project of Los Angeles clinic in Van Nuys from Feb. 27-29.

Philadelphia:

  • Pets for Life Philadelphia will sponsor free spay/neuter and vaccination services provided by the Pennsylvania SPCA and the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society for low-income pet owners during the month of February, most reached through HSUS community outreach efforts.
  • PFL Philadelphia will also sponsor spay/neuter surgeries of animals brought into clinics by local trap neuter return groups throughout the month of February.

For more information about these events, visit worldspayday.org.

Funds for horses and cattle to be administered by Montana Horse Sanctuary
 

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced that it has awarded a grant of $15,000 to Montana Horse Sanctuary in Simms, Mont., which will be used to buy hay and feed for horses and cattle affected by the disastrous wildfires that recently damaged about 18,000 acres of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation.

Early estimates are that 1,200 horses and cattle now have little or no feed.  The land is not expected to recover from the fire for months, but the need for feed will increase as new foals and calves are born, possibly swelling the animal population to about 2,000.

“We are happy to come to the aid of the livestock impacted by these destructive fires,” said Jacque Schultz, senior director of the ASPCA Equine Fund.  “These funds will be used to purchase much needed hay and feed for horses and cattle impacted by the devastating fires that destroyed buildings, uprooted residents and negatively impacted the food source for more than a thousand head of livestock.”

“Our organization is incredibly grateful to the ASPCA for its immediate and generous response to this crisis,” added Jane Heath, executive director of the Montana Horse Sanctuary.  “It’s a huge boost to our ability to help the Blackfeet Tribe and their animals during this difficult time.”

The ASPCA Equine Fund provides grants to non-profit equine welfare organizations in the United States for purposes in alignment with its efforts to protect horses. The ASPCA Equine Fund grants program seeks to award equine organizations that strive to achieve best practices, including sound horse care, maintenance of updated websites and robust fundraising practices.


About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. More than one million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c) (3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org. To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to www.twitter.com/aspca.

About Montana Horse Sanctuary
Montana Horse Sanctuary is a 501(c)-3 that was established to help rehabilitate and improve the lives of in crisis and abused horses, while educating the public about these magnificent and deserving animals. The sanctuary also helps horse owners in crisis with hay, euthanasia and veterinary grants.  For more information, please visit www.montanahorsesanctuary.org or call 406-264-5300.

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