Displaying items by tag: Canine Health Foundation

 

RALEIGH, NC (3/14/18) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (AKC CHF) and the V Foundation for Cancer Research announce a collaboration to fund cancer research for dogs that may also benefit people.

In an area of research known as “Comparative Oncology”, the two national organizations find they speak the same language. Comparative Oncology is the discipline that integrates naturally occurring cancers in dogs into broader studies of cancer biology and therapy. Since dogs and people get many of the same cancers, the AKC CHF and the V Foundation have teamed up to fund research in this field to benefit both species.

One of the cancers that occurs in both dogs and people is bladder cancer. Bladder cancer affects approximately 40,000 dogs and 79,000 people a year. The first project the AKC CHF and the V Foundation is jointly funding will test a new, targeted immunotherapy against a specific gene mutation that occurs in bladder cancer. Nicola Mason, BVetMed, PhD, a veterinary researcher at the University of Pennsylvania will lead the research team in this clinical trial entitled, “Immune Targeting of the V600E B-Raf Neoantigen in Canine Urothelial Carcinoma”.

“The V Foundation is excited about this partnership with the AKC CHF. Our funding of research in Comparative Oncology represents our belief that this work benefits humans and dogs alike. We are honored to co-fund this grant in memory of David Kane,” said Susan Braun, CEO of the V Foundation.

According to Dr. Diane Brown, CEO of the AKC CHF, “As veterinarians, we are trained to understand disease processes across species and have a clear understanding of the field of Comparative Oncology and comparative medicine. What is important now is to see human medicine working closely with veterinary medicine to benefit all species, and in this case, dogs and humans. We are thrilled to work with the V Foundation to lead in this area of research for a new cancer vaccine. Together we are stronger, and joining forces for bladder cancer research just makes sense.”

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About the AKC Canine Health Foundation

Since 1995, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation has awarded more than $40 million in research grants for the health of dogs, and works to prevent, treat and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

About the V Foundation for Cancer Research
The V Foundation for Cancer Research was founded in 1993 by ESPN and the late Jim Valvano, legendary North Carolina State University basketball coach and ESPN commentator. Since 1993, the Foundation has funded more than $200 million in cancer research grants nationwide. The V Foundation awards 100% of direct donations to cancer research and programs. The V Foundation’s endowment covers administrative expenses. The Foundation awards peer-reviewed grants through a competitive awards process strictly supervised by a Scientific Advisory Committee. For more information on the V Foundation or to make a donation, please visit www.jimmyv.org.

 

News Release

RALEIGH, N.C. (December 11, 2017) To sustain future advancements in canine health, the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is pleased to announce and congratulate recipients of the 2018 AKC Canine Health Foundation Clinician-Scientist Fellowships:

Kathryn Dalton, VMD, MPH, is a PhD student in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Under the mentorship of Dr. Meghan Davis, Dr. Dalton is researching microbial communities and how they relate to human and canine health.

Shelby Gasson, DVM, is a PhD student in the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Texas A&M University. Dr. Gasson is this year's AKC Canine Health Foundation GCHP Hill Country's Let's Get Ready To Rumble “Rumble” Clinician-Scientist Fellow (akcchf.org/rumble). Under the mentorship of Dr. Brian Saunders, Dr. Gasson is researching the development of tissue engineering constructs for treatment of osteochondral defects.

Mariah Gentry, DVM, is a veterinary post-doctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. Under the mentorship of Dr. Margret Casal, Dr. Gentry is researching the heritability of renal dysplasia in Cairn Terriers, and aims to develop a DNA-based marker test so the disorder can be diagnosed at an early age.

Sita Withers, BVSc(Hons), is a PhD student at the University of California, Davis. Her mentor is Dr. Robert B. Rebhun. Dr. Withers is studying how naturally occurring canine cancers can contribute to the understanding of immunotherapeutics in dogs as well as people, with a focus on osteosarcoma. 

Established in 2013, the AKC Canine Health Foundation Clinician-Scientist Fellowship Program seeks to encourage and support the next generation of canine health researchers to sustain future advancements in canine and one health. According to Dr. Diane Brown, AKC Canine Health Foundation Chief Executive Officer, “This class of Fellows was selected from a highly competitive field of candidates. We look forward to their progress in advancing the health of dogs.”

Additional considerations for selection of awardees include conducting research in line with CHF’s mission, and with preference given to residents/graduate students at institutions which have demonstrated progress and success with current and prior CHF funding. Each fellowship includes $10,000 for research and $2,000 for presentation of results at a national scientific meeting.

For the latest portfolio of CHF research grants outlining active studies being supported for the health of dogs, please see the 2018 AKC Canine Health Foundation Research Grants Portfolio.

Visit www.akcchf.org/fellows to learn more about the 2018 Fellows and their canine health research projects. Please support the CHF Clinician-Scientist Fellowship program with a donation.

 

 

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About CHF

Since 1995, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

News Release

For Immediate Release

 

AKC Canine Health Foundation Announces New Research to Tackle Bloat in Dogs

RALEIGH, N.C. (June 1, 2017) Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV, or bloat) is a serious problem for many canine breeds, but little is truly known about the causes of this deadly disease. While any larger dog can be affected, targeted breed-specific research can help advance understanding of potential genetic factors that may predispose dogs to developing bloat.

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) announces a new research grant to Dr. Michael Harkey of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center to study the genetics of bloat and its association with specific genes of the immune system and gut bacteria. The research grant is entitled, “The Genetics of Bloat in German Shepherd Dogs: The Roles of Immune System Genes and the Gut Microbiome.” Dr. Harkey’s team recently completed a study in Great Danes in which they showed a significant association of three genes of the dogs’ immune system with bloat. For each of the three genes, one allele (variant) was found at high frequency in dogs with bloat, and the presence of any one of these "risk" alleles tripled the chance the dog would experience bloat during its life. Their findings will be published in an upcoming issue of the American Journal of Veterinary Research. The research team also showed that the bacterial population living in the intestinal tract (the gut microbiome) was altered in dogs with bloat and in dogs that carry these "risk" alleles, possibly predisposing them to bloat.

CHF’s CEO, Dr. Diane Brown, states that, “While we don’t yet know if other dogs show this same association of genetics and the gut microbiome with GDV, this new research will explore whether this association occurs in another breed of dog, the German Shepherd Dog.” According to Dr. Harkey, “Our hope is to define genetic markers for identification of at-risk dogs of all breeds, and ultimately, to design appropriate probiotic or dietary therapies to prevent GDV. This funding will carry us closer to these goals.”

With great concern for the health of their breed and the devastating effects bloat has had on so many dogs, the American German Shepherd Dog Charitable Foundation, Inc. (AGSDCF) has unanimously decided to donate full financial support to CHF for this grant. “This is all about giving back to our dogs through this important research,” says Debra Ann Hokkanen, President of the AGSDCF. “We applaud our Board of Directors and supporters who honor and remember their dogs through this donation. We are very proud to have the opportunity to work with CHF on this project as we give back to our dogs and to the remarkable people who care for them.”

Dr. Harkey is seeking samples from German Shepherd Dogs, and will send sample collection kits to those with eligible dogs. He can be contacted at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 206-667-3369.

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About CHF

Since 1995, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

News Release
For Immediate Release

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (February 27, 2017) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce that it has awarded the first research grant through the Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium (CBTC). The CBTC was launched at the National Institutes of Health by a group of clinicians and investigators in the fields of veterinary and human neuro-oncology, clinical trials, neuropathology, and drug development.

Participants in the CBTC evaluated the role that naturally occurring canine brain tumors could have in advancing comparative oncology aimed at improving outcomes for canine and human patients with brain cancer. The findings of the CBTC were published in a white paper, “Creation of an NCI comparative brain tumor consortium: informing the translation of new knowledge from canine to human brain tumor patients.” The AKC Canine Health Foundation, committed to this effort, has awarded the first research grant through this consortium, Clinical Trial of Procaspase-3 Activator (PAC-1) in Combination with Hydroxyurea for Treatment of Canine Meningioma, led by principal investigator, Dr. Timothy M. Fan, DVM, PhD from the University of Illinois.

“The National Cancer Institute is thrilled to partner with the academic community, with the generous support of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, to conduct the inaugural clinical trial of the Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium,” said Amy LeBlanc, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM (Oncology), Director, Comparative Oncology Program.  “In this effort we bring together unique and cutting-edge technology, knowledge and clinical expertise to evaluate a novel therapeutic and diagnostic approach to canine meningioma.”

Primary brain tumors are a significant cause of illness and death in pet dogs, with meningioma accounting for approximately half of the cases seen by veterinary neurologists and oncologists. Although surgery remains the best treatment for dogs with meningioma, some dogs are not good candidates for this approach based on their tumor size and/or location. Dogs also may experience tumor regrowth after surgery. In these situations, effective treatment options are limited. New treatments that are both safe and effective are needed for dogs with meningioma.

Dr. Fan and a team of investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Comparative Oncology Program and selected veterinary academic centers will work together using state-of-the art imaging and a novel therapeutic approach for dogs with meningioma that are good surgical candidates. Dogs enrolled in this study will receive an investigational combination of chemotherapy agents (PAC-1 + hydroxyurea) and will be monitored with magnetic resonance and non-invasive molecular imaging techniques. Dogs will then undergo tumor removal to further their treatment. This approach to a new therapy for dogs has the potential to also translate to treatments for humans with advanced, locally-recurrent, and/or non-resectable meningioma.

According to Dr. Fan, "The National Cancer Institute’s Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium, through the generous support of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, has a unique opportunity to investigate a combination of novel advanced imaging techniques in conjunction with new therapies for dogs with meningioma. It is hoped that the findings derived from this new study will generate important data on how canine meningioma can be monitored non-invasively with molecular imaging, and if combining cytotoxic agents with a procaspase-3 activating compound can produce measurable anticancer effects."

Dr. Diane Brown, CEO of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, and one of the co-authors of the original CBTC summary paper, says, “This first project is a way toward a future to advance care for dogs and humans who share environments, and diseases such as brain tumors. By working together through studies such as this one, we leverage the strengths of veterinary and human medicine and research to seek opportunities for new paths to cure diseases shared by both species.”

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

News Release
For Immediate Release

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (January 20, 2017) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce it has met the Year I fundraising goal of $250,000 for its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, launched in February 2016. Funds raised were matched dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club.

Building on this progress, CHF will carry this important Initiative into Year II. Grants funded through the Initiative aim to find better diagnostics, preventives and therapeutics for tick-borne diseases in dogs. In addition, free educational resources, including webinars, a whitepaper and articles are available at www.akcchf.org/ticks.

CHF is excited to announce that once again, as an added incentive, all donations to the CHF Tick-Borne Disease Initiative during 2017 will be generously matched dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club (AKC), up to $250,000.

“The AKC is proud of the progress made through CHF’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, and we are pleased to once again provide these matching funds to the Initiative in 2017,” said Harvey Wooding, AKC Board of Directors. “Tick-borne disease has far-reaching impacts on both dogs and humans, and the AKC supports this work for the health of dogs.”

Tick-Borne diseases are an important group of emerging infectious diseases. As the geographic range of ticks continues to expand, both dogs and people can be affected by these diseases, year-round. CHF’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative and new research grants address important health concerns including Lyme disease, bartonellosis, and ehrlichiosis, to name a few.  

“We are grateful to the AKC for continuing their generous match of funds raised through the Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, and we also thank the many individuals, dog clubs and foundations who have supported this important Initiative to help us reach our year I  goal,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF CEO. “We believe, through this dedicated research effort, we can make a long-lasting impact on these diseases in dogs and their human companions.”

To learn more about CHF’s tick-borne disease initiative, including the opportunity to double your donation, visit www.akcchf.org/ticks.

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.


 

RALEIGH, N.C. (September 20, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce ongoing progress through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative.

Launched in February 2016, this comprehensive Initiative addresses important health concerns that include Lyme disease, bartonellosis, and ehrlichiosis, through much-needed research in diagnostics, disease pathogenesis and prevalence. Tick-borne diseases are an important group of emerging infectious diseases that impact both dogs and their people. As the geographic range of ticks continues to expand, all dogs can be affected by these diseases, year-round.

Through a $100,000 leadership gift from Kiki Courtelis, a longtime friend to animal health, and a combined $50,000 gift from the English Springer Spaniel Foundation and English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association, as well as generous gifts from many individuals, dog clubs, and foundations, the donations raised toward the Initiative, and matched by the American Kennel Club, are driving further progress in this important research for dogs. 

“When my veterinarian tells me that he diagnoses Lyme disease at least three times a week, I thought it was worthwhile to find an organization truly attacking these diseases to improve testing, treatment and cures,” said Kiki Courtelis.  “It means the world to me that I'm blessed to participate in CHF’s initiative, and be a part of improving the health of the dogs we love so much.”

To date, donations to the Initiative have resulted in the Foundation awarding a first round of five grants to improve diagnostics and enhance practical understanding of tick-borne diseases, including effects of these infections on blood cells, the canine blood donor population, disease prevalence in dogs, and treatment recommendations.

According to Mark Haglin, English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association president, “We have had many encounters over the years with tick-borne disease in our Springer Spaniels and we are very proud to play a role in this Initiative. Being closely associated with friends who are dealing with the devastating effects of Lyme disease, I hope these grants will bring some crossover results on the human side of treatment as well.”

“The Foundation chose this area of research important to canine health because we believe we can have an immediate and long-lasting impact on these diseases in dogs and their human companions,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF CEO. “Since launching the Initiative, many of CHF’s supporters have shared stories of a beloved dog being diagnosed with a tick-borne disease like babesiosis, anaplasmosis, or bartonellosis, or a human family member or friend with a diagnosis of Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis or Rocky Mountain spotted fever. The stories remind us of the urgent need to address these diseases that afflict dogs and people.”

To learn more about CHF’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, including research outcomes, free educational resources, and additional RFP announcements, visit www.akcchf.org/ticks. “Tick-borne diseases can surprise you, and the need for accurate diagnosis, proper treatment and prevention is critical,” said Brown.

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs and foundations, and individuals who are committed to the betterment of canine health through scientific research. During 2016, donations from new and lapsed donors (last donation 12/31/2013), will be generously matched for research dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club. Make an impact and double your donation today!

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (August 29, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, announces an exciting new grant that aims to address thyroid disease in dogs. Funding for this grant is made possible by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA), a long-time partner of CHF.

Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrine disorders in adult dogs with a majority of cases caused by autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT). The dog’s own immune system attacks the thyroid gland causing progressive, irreversible destruction of thyroid gland cells resulting in loss of thyroid hormone production. This disorder is similar to Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, a leading cause of hypothyroidism in people.

Brian Petroff, DVM, PhD and Kent R. Refsal, DVM, PhD of Michigan State University will study dogs with elevated thyroglobulin autoantibodies (TgAA) as a marker for early stage AIT. Identification of elevated TgAA with otherwise normal thyroid hormone concentrations is referred to as ‘subclinical thyroiditis.’ Dogs with subclinical thyroiditis are considered at risk of progression to hypothyroidism. It is assumed that while dogs with subclinical thyroiditis have increased TgAA, the rate of progression to hypothyroidism varies, and not all dogs with increased TgAA will become hypothyroid. Drs. Petroff and Refsal aim to more accurately define the proportion of dogs that subsequently develop hypothyroidism, and a progression timeline.

“Year after year, thyroid disease has been listed among the top ten parent club health concerns. The OFA is pleased to join our long-standing partner, the AKC Canine Health Foundation, and one of the country’s leading endocrine labs at Michigan State University, in pursuing and funding this important research,” said Eddie Dziuk, OFA chief operating officer.

 “OFA continues to be a strong ally in our mission to improve the health and wellness of all dogs,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF CEO. “Thyroid disease remains an important canine health concern, and this project will help us better understand the progression of thyroid disorders in dogs, with potential to improve understanding of the disease in humans as well.”

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (July 25, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, announces a second round of new grants awarded through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative. This comprehensive Initiative addresses important health concerns that include Lyme disease, bartonellosis, and ehrlichiosis, through much-needed research in diagnostics, disease pathogenesis and prevalence.

Edward B. Breitschwerdt, DVM, DACVIM, of North Carolina State University, will study “Enhanced Testing for the Diagnosis of Bartonellosis in Dogs.” Bartonellosis is a potentially life-threatening zoonotic disease distributed throughout the world by approximately ten different Bartonella bacteria species. Bartonella bacteria are transmitted to dogs and humans by ticks, fleas, lice, mites, and sand flies. Due to a lack of sensitive and reliable diagnostic tests, definitive diagnosis of bartonellosis in dogs remains a significant problem. Because these bacteria invade cells and infect tissues throughout the body, this chronic intracellular infection is difficult to cure with currently used antibiotic regimens. Dr. Breitschwerdt and his team aim to develop improved blood tests for bartonellosis in dogs that can also be used for world-wide sero-epidemiological prevalence studies, and to establish early and accurate diagnosis.

Pedro Paul Diniz, DVM, PhD, of Western University of Health Sciences, will study “Broad-Range Detection of Canine Tick-Borne Disease and Improved Diagnostics Using Next-Generation Sequencing.” Currently available tests for vector-borne diseases in dogs rely on previously known DNA sequences of each pathogen, with little room for detecting new or emerging organisms. This results in false negatives for tick-borne diseases, leaving veterinarians and dog owners frustrated by a lack of definitive diagnosis. Using an innovative approach, Dr. Diniz and team will employ next-generation sequencing (NGS) to overcome the limitations of current diagnostic technology. Testing samples from dogs naturally exposed to tick-borne diseases, NGS will detect not only new organisms but also characterize genetic differences among known organisms. The resulting dataset of a large number of DNA sequences of known tick-borne organisms and previously undetected organisms in naturally-infected dogs will support the development of diagnostic tools to simultaneously advance canine and human health.

In addition to these two new grants, earlier this year the AKC Canine Health Foundation awarded three grants through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative. The three grants address Lyme disease, vector-borne disease testing for canine blood donors, and ehrlichiosis. 

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs, and individuals who are committed to the betterment of canine health through scientific research. During 2016, all donations to the Tick-Borne Disease Initiative are being matched dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club (up to $250,000). Make an impact and double your donation today: www.akcchf.org/ticks.  

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (May 4, 2016) –  The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat, and cure diseases in all dogs, marks Pet Cancer Awareness Month by providing free educational resources and research updates on canine cancer to dog lovers throughout the world.

“During the month of May, CHF focuses on providing news and information to help educate dog owners about the cutting-edge research and improved treatment options in the field of canine cancer, while also emphasizing the continued need for further research,” said Dr. Diane Brown, chief executive officer of CHF.

Canine cancer treatment options continue to improve and many have a One Health benefit, providing insight and better treatment options not only for our dogs, but for their human companions as well. For example, CHF has awarded a grant to Dr. Rowan J. Milner at the University of Florida to study vaccine development against osteosarcoma, an aggressive form of bone cancer that is diagnosed in nearly 10,000 dogs per year and also afflicts children.

CHF recently learned of Mya, a German Shorthaired Pointer who was diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Mya received radiation and chemotherapy treatments that were originally developed to treat the same disease in children. Mya’s inspirational story speaks to the importance of canine cancer research and the benefits it holds for both species.

Since 1995 CHF has funded over $11.5 million in canine cancer research. Over 200 research grants have provided breakthroughs in treatment options and diagnoses, and have helped scientists study cancer at the cellular level, allowing veterinarians to diagnose cancer earlier and treat it more effectively.  

Dog owners and dog lovers can directly impact the future of canine cancer research by making a donation to CHF. New or lapsed donors who have not given to CHF since December 31, 2013 will have their contributions matched dollar for dollar by the American Kennel Club (up to $500,000).

Visit www.akcchf.org/caninecancer to access free resources and to learn more about canine cancer.

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

RALEIGH, N.C. (March 11, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce that at a board meeting on March 6, 2016, the AKC Canine Health Foundation elected the following new Directors:

  • Sue M. Copeland is an award-winning journalist, former editor of Horse & Rider Magazine, and author of more than a dozen books for both the horse and dog worlds. She is a successful conformation competitor, and owner of GCH Derby's Toast With Gusto, “Gus,” the top-winning Greater Swiss Mountain Dog in breed history (conformation).
  • Wayne Jensen, DVM, PhD, MBA, brings more than 30 years of experience in the animal health industry, including veterinary practice, research, product development, business development and research grant funding. Dr. Jensen is professor and interim head in the Department of Clinical Sciences at Colorado State University and owner of a veterinary practice with his wife, Tracey, also a veterinarian. He trains and competes in retriever field trials and hunt tests.

In addition, J. Charles Garvin, MD was elected as the Chairman of the Board. Dr. Garvin is an active ophthalmic surgeon and has been president of a 72-physician medical practice for 25 years. Dr. Garvin has been closely associated with Dalmatians since the 1960s, having served as president of the Dalmatian Club of America (DCA) multiple times, as well as a member of their board for nearly 35 years. A life member of DCA, Central Ohio Kennel Club and Marion Ohio Kennel Club, Dr. Garvin has been an AKC Delegate since 1990 and currently serves as President of the DCA Foundation and Marion Ohio Kennel Club. He is also a member of the American Kennel Club Board of Directors.

“I am excited to take on this challenge of following those who have led this organization so successfully these past two decades. Working together with the board, staff, donors and volunteers, we have the opportunity to expand the reputation, engagement and influence of the AKC Canine Health Foundation throughout the canine world,” said Dr. Garvin.

To learn more about the AKC Canine Health Foundation board of directors, please visit our website.

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About the AKC Canine Health Foundation

For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases impacting all dogs while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

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