Displaying items by tag: CHF

 

RALEIGH, NC (November 5, 2019) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) announces another year of growth in grants awarded for canine health research.  In 2019, CHF has awarded 46 new research grants totaling over $2.8 million to benefit canine health. CHF currently manages 135 active grants representing funding of more than $10.8 million, bringing their total funding to $52.9 million for canine health research and educational programs. Outcomes from this funding have resulted in more than 775 publications in peer-reviewed journals since their founding in 1995.In addition to addressing overall health concerns for all dogs, CHF’s ongoing hemangiosarcoma, tick-borne disease, and epilepsy research initiatives provided expanded funding opportunities for these important diseases during 2019. CHF and their donors continued funding for new educational grants to support the American Kennel Club/AKC Canine Health Foundation/Theriogenology Foundation Small Animal Theriogenology Residency Program, and their Clinician-Scientist Fellowship Program.As part of the educational outreach component of their mission, CHF sponsored five webinars by CHF-funded investigators on topics such as CBD oil use for dogs, updates on canine influenza, canine degenerative myelopathy, early maternal influences on puppies being raised as service dogs, and discussion of spay/neuter on overall health, providing continuing education for veterinary professionals, dog owners, and breeders. Also, CHF hosted the National Parent Club Canine Health Conference in St. Louis, MO in August. The biennial event, sponsored by Purina, brought together researchers, American Kennel Club (AKC) Parent Club members, breeders, veterinarians, veterinary residents, and veterinary students to discuss the latest findings in canine health research.“We are honored to collaborate with the best scientists, breeders, veterinarians and dog lovers to achieve better health for all dogs,” states CHF CEO, Dr. Diane Brown. “As we enter our 25th year in 2020, we look forward to creating more opportunities to advance canine health research."CHF earned a highest four-star rating from Charity Navigator again this year and maintained its platinum rating from GuideStar, demonstrating programs excellence and that it exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, accountability and transparency, and outperforms most charities in its category.Matched funding opportunities provided a means for CHF donors to double their impact on canine health in 2019. The AKC continues to match donations from new and lapsed donors and the American German Shepherd Dog Charitable Foundation is matching donations for hemangiosarcoma research.With gratitude for their donors’ support, CHF continues to achieve its mission to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding humane scientific research and supporting the dissemination of health information to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Donation information can be found at akcchf.org/donate.

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About CHF

Since 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science to address the health needs of all dogs. With more than $52 million in funding to date, the Foundation provides grants for the highest quality canine health research and shares information on the discoveries that help prevent, treat and cure canine diseases. The Foundation meets and exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, as demonstrated by their highest four-star Charity Navigator rating and GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency. Learn more at www.akcchf.org.

 

RALEIGH, NC (April 30, 2019) - The American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation (CHF) marks Pet Cancer Awareness Month this May with the launch of their Canine Cancer Research Initiative. The focus of this initiative is to direct research funding that will advance understanding, treatment and prevention of canine cancer to benefit dogs. With almost $2.3 million already invested in currently active canine cancer research, new oncology grants were recently awarded to study brain tumors, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and lymphoma, including:

  • 02663: Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium (CBTC) Meningioma Pathology Board
  • 02643-A:  Examination of the Effects of Cannabidiol on Canine Neoplastic Cell Apoptosis/Autophagy and Chemotherapy Resistance or Sensitivity
  • 02642-A:  NF-kappaB Inactivation Enhances Apoptosis in Canine Osteosarcoma Cells
  • 02636-A:  Development of RNA in-situ Hybridization to Identify T Regulatory Cells and their Function within the Tumor Microenvironment of Canine Oral Malignant Melanoma
  • 02595-A:  Defining the Flow Cytometric Characteristics of Normal and Diseased Canine Spleen and Visceral Lymph Nodes 

These studies complement ongoing canine cancer studies for hemangiosarcoma, lymphoma, bladder cancer, and more. Information on all active studies can be found in CHF's Research Grants Portfolio, including studies funded through CHF's Hemangiosarcoma Research Initiative.“The AKC Canine Health Foundation has a longstanding commitment to canine cancer research. The Canine Cancer Research Initiative provides an opportunity to advance our understanding of cancer in dogs while also exploring new targets for their diagnosis and treatment,” states Dr. Diane Brown, CHF Chief Executive Officer. “With the support generated through this initiative, CHF can resource more research to help dogs while also informing a comparative oncology aspect to the same cancers that affect people. Together with our donors, we are making progress in the fight against cancer.”The increase in canine cancer research funding is bolstered by the American Kennel Club’s pledge to match donations to the CHF Canine Cancer Research Initiative with an equal donation to CHF for canine health research up to $250,000 in 2019.Since 1995, CHF has invested more than $13 million to study canine cancer in search of ways to diagnose cancer earlier and treat it more effectively. Learn more about AKC Canine Health Foundation’s Canine Cancer Research Initiative and join the fight against cancer at akcchf.org/caninecancer.

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About AKC Canine Health Foundation
Since 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science to address the health needs of all dogs. With more than $46 million in funding to date, the Foundation provides grants for the highest quality canine health research and shares information on the discoveries that help prevent, treat and cure canine diseases. The Foundation meets and exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility, as demonstrated by their highest four-star Charity Navigator rating and GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency. Learn more at www.akcchf.org.

 

   

Established in 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation's (CHF) mission is to advance the health of all dogs and their owners by funding scientific research and supporting the dissemination of health information to prevent, treat and cure canine disease.

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8051 Arco Corporate Drive, Suite 300, Raleigh, NC 27617
tel: 888.682.9696 | fax: 919.334.4011

RALEIGH, NC (September 19, 2018) –The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF)  has extended their matched funding opportunity for the 2018 Hemangiosarcoma Research Initiative. To date, the American Kennel Club (AKC) has matched $250,000 in donations made to CHF’s Hemangiosarcoma Research Initiative. In early August, the Golden Retriever Foundation (GRF) generously pledged to match donations up to an additional $50,000. Now the Flat-Coated Retriever Foundation (FCRF) pledges another $25,000 in matched funds. This brings CHF’s matched fundraising opportunity through the Hemangiosarcoma Research Initiative to a total of $325,000.“By collaborating with the AKC and breed foundations such as the Golden Retriever Foundation and the Flat-Coated Retriever Foundation, we will continue to find and fund the best research to address this devastating cancer in dogs,” states Dr. Diane Brown, CHF CEO. “We are committed to finding new options for dog lovers and their canine companions affected by this disease.”Hemangiosarcoma is a rapidly progressing cancer of the cells that line canine blood vessels. It most often affects a dog’s spleen and heart. Since 1995, CHF has invested in research to better understand the biology and progression of canine hemangiosarcoma in an effort to design new and effective approaches for prevention and treatment. CHF will continue to expand its hemangiosarcoma research funding opportunities through this initiative as part of its diverse portfolio of more than 140 currently active canine health research grants"The Flat-Coated Retriever Foundation is committed to a vision of future generations of sound and healthy Flat-Coats,” states Cheryl Kistner, FCRF President. “We are proud to partner with the AKC Canine Health Foundation on their Hemangiosarcoma Research Initiative to provide hope for the future good health of Flat-Coats and all dogs.”"The Golden Retriever Foundation is committed to finding a cause and cure for hemangiosarcoma, a horrible cancer that defies early detection and lacks a remedy,” states John Cotter, GRF President. “We hope this extended match will allow individuals and organizations who have been adversely affected by hemangiosarcoma to participate in eradicating this disease.”Since 1995 CHF has awarded more than $13 million in grants for canine cancer research. These research grants have helped scientists study cancer at the cellular level and provided breakthroughs in diagnostic and treatment options, allowing veterinarians to diagnose cancer earlier and treat it more effectively. The Hemangiosarcoma Research Initiative was started in January 2018 to focus on a better understanding of the biology and progression of this aggressive cancer. Thanks to the generous support of its donors and the collaborative efforts of the AKC, GRF, and FCRF, CHF will continue to invest in canine health research so that all dogs can live longer, healthier lives. To learn more and to join us to meet this match, visit www.akcchf.org/hemangiosarcoma.

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About AKC Canine Health Foundation
Since 1995, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science to address the health needs of all dogs. The Foundation funds the highest quality canine health research and shares information on funded discoveries that help prevent, treat and cure canine diseases. The Foundation exceeds industry standards for fiscal responsibility as demonstrated by their four-star rating from Charity Navigator and Platinum Seal of Transparency from GuideStar. Learn more at www.akcchf.org.About the Flat-Coated Retriever Foundation
Founded in 1998, the Flat-Coated Retriever Foundation (FCRF) funds research into cancer and other health problems affecting Flat-Coated Retrievers. Their funded projects fight existing diseases and study inherited problems to provide breeders with the information necessary to make wise breeding choices that will produce future generations of sound and healthy Flat-Coats. FCRF also funds rescue efforts to ensure that abandoned Flat-Coats can be well cared for and placed in good homes. Learn more at www.fcrfoundation.org. About the Golden Retriever Foundation
The Golden Retriever Foundation’s mission is to foster and promote the public's knowledge and appreciation of dogs in general and Golden Retrievers in particular; to further understanding of the diseases, genetic defects, injuries and other ailments that afflict dogs in general and Golden Retrievers in particular; to promote and assist the development, publication and dissemination of educational materials about the proper care, treatment, breeding, health, development and training of Golden Retrievers; and to foster and promote the rescue, rehabilitation and placement of displaced Golden Retrievers. Learn more at www.goldenretrieverfoundation.org.

Talkin' Pets News

September 9, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Maria Ryan - DogGone Positive

Producer - Zach Budin

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media/Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Author of Yin & Yang Nuitrition for Dogs, Dr. Judy Morgan will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/08/18 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away her new book

Dr. Thomas Edling from Felisept will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/08/18 at 720pm EST to discuss stress in cats and give away Felisept to our listeners

NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release

RALEIGH, NC (May 30, 2018) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a non-profit organization committed to better health for all dogs, is pleased to accept a $50,000 donation from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) in support of CHF’s Clinician Scientist Fellowship Program. With this donation, OFA surpasses $500,000 in cumulative contributions to CHF over a productive 20-year partnership.

The OFA has generously supported CHF research on numerous canine health topics including musculoskeletal disease, thyroid disease, genetics, oncology, and neurology. The foundations co-sponsored the creation of the Canine Health Information Center (CHIC), which partners with American Kennel Club (AKC) parent breed clubs for research and to maintain information on health issues of dogs. OFA has also sponsored the Veterinary Student Scholarship program, hosting students from US schools of veterinary medicine to attend CHF’s biennial National Parent Club Canine Health Conference.

“Understanding the need to develop and support the next generation of researchers, the OFA is especially pleased to announce a $50,000 contribution to the AKC CHF’s Clinician Scientist Fellowship Program,” states OFA Chief Operating Officer, Eddie Dziuk.

CHF makes it a priority to encourage and support educational opportunities for trainees in canine health research. The Clinician Scientist Fellowship Program was established in 2012 to provide financial support to residents and graduate students demonstrating promise and enthusiasm for pursuing a career in canine health research. CHF collaborates with the AKC and the Theriogenology Foundation to provide educational grants for residency programs in theriogenology (animal reproductive health) and clinical genetics. CHF also provides support for veterinary students through educational grants for canine health research projects mentored by foundation staff or CHF-funded researchers. These examples of CHF’s funding for educational programs ensure that their mission to prevent, treat and cure canine disease will endure for years to come.

“Investing in the next generation of scientists is a vital part of our mission,” says Dr. Diane Brown, Chief Executive Officer of CHF. “We welcome the OFA’s shared commitment to encourage and support these young researchers. Together, we are making a positive impact on the future for canine health.”

Dziuk says the OFA “can think of no better collaborative partner than CHF in our joint efforts to advance the health of dogs.”

To learn more about CHF’s commitment to training grants for future scientists, please see CHF’s educational grants.

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About CHF

Since 1995, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs. The Foundation works to prevent, treat and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

About OFA

Founded in 1966, the OFA mission is to promote the health and welfare of companion animals through a reduction in the incidence of genetic disease. This is accomplished through maintenance of an extensive database of canine genealogic and phenotypic information, a DNA repository for research and testing, and funding research on numerous canine health concerns.

 

RALEIGH, NC (3/14/18) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (AKC CHF) and the V Foundation for Cancer Research announce a collaboration to fund cancer research for dogs that may also benefit people.

In an area of research known as “Comparative Oncology”, the two national organizations find they speak the same language. Comparative Oncology is the discipline that integrates naturally occurring cancers in dogs into broader studies of cancer biology and therapy. Since dogs and people get many of the same cancers, the AKC CHF and the V Foundation have teamed up to fund research in this field to benefit both species.

One of the cancers that occurs in both dogs and people is bladder cancer. Bladder cancer affects approximately 40,000 dogs and 79,000 people a year. The first project the AKC CHF and the V Foundation is jointly funding will test a new, targeted immunotherapy against a specific gene mutation that occurs in bladder cancer. Nicola Mason, BVetMed, PhD, a veterinary researcher at the University of Pennsylvania will lead the research team in this clinical trial entitled, “Immune Targeting of the V600E B-Raf Neoantigen in Canine Urothelial Carcinoma”.

“The V Foundation is excited about this partnership with the AKC CHF. Our funding of research in Comparative Oncology represents our belief that this work benefits humans and dogs alike. We are honored to co-fund this grant in memory of David Kane,” said Susan Braun, CEO of the V Foundation.

According to Dr. Diane Brown, CEO of the AKC CHF, “As veterinarians, we are trained to understand disease processes across species and have a clear understanding of the field of Comparative Oncology and comparative medicine. What is important now is to see human medicine working closely with veterinary medicine to benefit all species, and in this case, dogs and humans. We are thrilled to work with the V Foundation to lead in this area of research for a new cancer vaccine. Together we are stronger, and joining forces for bladder cancer research just makes sense.”

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About the AKC Canine Health Foundation

Since 1995, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation has awarded more than $40 million in research grants for the health of dogs, and works to prevent, treat and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

About the V Foundation for Cancer Research
The V Foundation for Cancer Research was founded in 1993 by ESPN and the late Jim Valvano, legendary North Carolina State University basketball coach and ESPN commentator. Since 1993, the Foundation has funded more than $200 million in cancer research grants nationwide. The V Foundation awards 100% of direct donations to cancer research and programs. The V Foundation’s endowment covers administrative expenses. The Foundation awards peer-reviewed grants through a competitive awards process strictly supervised by a Scientific Advisory Committee. For more information on the V Foundation or to make a donation, please visit www.jimmyv.org.

 

News Release

For Immediate Release

 

AKC Canine Health Foundation Announces New Research to Tackle Bloat in Dogs

RALEIGH, N.C. (June 1, 2017) Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV, or bloat) is a serious problem for many canine breeds, but little is truly known about the causes of this deadly disease. While any larger dog can be affected, targeted breed-specific research can help advance understanding of potential genetic factors that may predispose dogs to developing bloat.

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) announces a new research grant to Dr. Michael Harkey of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center to study the genetics of bloat and its association with specific genes of the immune system and gut bacteria. The research grant is entitled, “The Genetics of Bloat in German Shepherd Dogs: The Roles of Immune System Genes and the Gut Microbiome.” Dr. Harkey’s team recently completed a study in Great Danes in which they showed a significant association of three genes of the dogs’ immune system with bloat. For each of the three genes, one allele (variant) was found at high frequency in dogs with bloat, and the presence of any one of these "risk" alleles tripled the chance the dog would experience bloat during its life. Their findings will be published in an upcoming issue of the American Journal of Veterinary Research. The research team also showed that the bacterial population living in the intestinal tract (the gut microbiome) was altered in dogs with bloat and in dogs that carry these "risk" alleles, possibly predisposing them to bloat.

CHF’s CEO, Dr. Diane Brown, states that, “While we don’t yet know if other dogs show this same association of genetics and the gut microbiome with GDV, this new research will explore whether this association occurs in another breed of dog, the German Shepherd Dog.” According to Dr. Harkey, “Our hope is to define genetic markers for identification of at-risk dogs of all breeds, and ultimately, to design appropriate probiotic or dietary therapies to prevent GDV. This funding will carry us closer to these goals.”

With great concern for the health of their breed and the devastating effects bloat has had on so many dogs, the American German Shepherd Dog Charitable Foundation, Inc. (AGSDCF) has unanimously decided to donate full financial support to CHF for this grant. “This is all about giving back to our dogs through this important research,” says Debra Ann Hokkanen, President of the AGSDCF. “We applaud our Board of Directors and supporters who honor and remember their dogs through this donation. We are very proud to have the opportunity to work with CHF on this project as we give back to our dogs and to the remarkable people who care for them.”

Dr. Harkey is seeking samples from German Shepherd Dogs, and will send sample collection kits to those with eligible dogs. He can be contacted at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 206-667-3369.

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About CHF

Since 1995, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

News Release
For Immediate Release

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (January 20, 2017) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce it has met the Year I fundraising goal of $250,000 for its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, launched in February 2016. Funds raised were matched dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club.

Building on this progress, CHF will carry this important Initiative into Year II. Grants funded through the Initiative aim to find better diagnostics, preventives and therapeutics for tick-borne diseases in dogs. In addition, free educational resources, including webinars, a whitepaper and articles are available at www.akcchf.org/ticks.

CHF is excited to announce that once again, as an added incentive, all donations to the CHF Tick-Borne Disease Initiative during 2017 will be generously matched dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club (AKC), up to $250,000.

“The AKC is proud of the progress made through CHF’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, and we are pleased to once again provide these matching funds to the Initiative in 2017,” said Harvey Wooding, AKC Board of Directors. “Tick-borne disease has far-reaching impacts on both dogs and humans, and the AKC supports this work for the health of dogs.”

Tick-Borne diseases are an important group of emerging infectious diseases. As the geographic range of ticks continues to expand, both dogs and people can be affected by these diseases, year-round. CHF’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative and new research grants address important health concerns including Lyme disease, bartonellosis, and ehrlichiosis, to name a few.  

“We are grateful to the AKC for continuing their generous match of funds raised through the Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, and we also thank the many individuals, dog clubs and foundations who have supported this important Initiative to help us reach our year I  goal,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF CEO. “We believe, through this dedicated research effort, we can make a long-lasting impact on these diseases in dogs and their human companions.”

To learn more about CHF’s tick-borne disease initiative, including the opportunity to double your donation, visit www.akcchf.org/ticks.

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.


 

RALEIGH, N.C. (September 20, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce ongoing progress through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative.

Launched in February 2016, this comprehensive Initiative addresses important health concerns that include Lyme disease, bartonellosis, and ehrlichiosis, through much-needed research in diagnostics, disease pathogenesis and prevalence. Tick-borne diseases are an important group of emerging infectious diseases that impact both dogs and their people. As the geographic range of ticks continues to expand, all dogs can be affected by these diseases, year-round.

Through a $100,000 leadership gift from Kiki Courtelis, a longtime friend to animal health, and a combined $50,000 gift from the English Springer Spaniel Foundation and English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association, as well as generous gifts from many individuals, dog clubs, and foundations, the donations raised toward the Initiative, and matched by the American Kennel Club, are driving further progress in this important research for dogs. 

“When my veterinarian tells me that he diagnoses Lyme disease at least three times a week, I thought it was worthwhile to find an organization truly attacking these diseases to improve testing, treatment and cures,” said Kiki Courtelis.  “It means the world to me that I'm blessed to participate in CHF’s initiative, and be a part of improving the health of the dogs we love so much.”

To date, donations to the Initiative have resulted in the Foundation awarding a first round of five grants to improve diagnostics and enhance practical understanding of tick-borne diseases, including effects of these infections on blood cells, the canine blood donor population, disease prevalence in dogs, and treatment recommendations.

According to Mark Haglin, English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association president, “We have had many encounters over the years with tick-borne disease in our Springer Spaniels and we are very proud to play a role in this Initiative. Being closely associated with friends who are dealing with the devastating effects of Lyme disease, I hope these grants will bring some crossover results on the human side of treatment as well.”

“The Foundation chose this area of research important to canine health because we believe we can have an immediate and long-lasting impact on these diseases in dogs and their human companions,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF CEO. “Since launching the Initiative, many of CHF’s supporters have shared stories of a beloved dog being diagnosed with a tick-borne disease like babesiosis, anaplasmosis, or bartonellosis, or a human family member or friend with a diagnosis of Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis or Rocky Mountain spotted fever. The stories remind us of the urgent need to address these diseases that afflict dogs and people.”

To learn more about CHF’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, including research outcomes, free educational resources, and additional RFP announcements, visit www.akcchf.org/ticks. “Tick-borne diseases can surprise you, and the need for accurate diagnosis, proper treatment and prevention is critical,” said Brown.

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs and foundations, and individuals who are committed to the betterment of canine health through scientific research. During 2016, donations from new and lapsed donors (last donation 12/31/2013), will be generously matched for research dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club. Make an impact and double your donation today!

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (August 1, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce that Bradford Brady has been hired as director of development for the Foundation. In this role, Mr. Brady will lead the Foundation’s fundraising efforts to further the mission of the organization.

“We are thrilled to have Bradford on board, and are confident his knowledge and expertise in the nonprofit sector and in fundraising will help CHF continue to grow,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF chief executive officer.

As the director of development, Mr. Brady will foster and establish relationships with individuals, breed clubs, and corporations that are committed to the health of all dogs. Additionally, he will develop strategies to increase major, annual and planned gifts to the Foundation. 

“I look forward to working with the many people committed to CHF, and establishing a comprehensive fundraising plan that will enable further funding of canine health research,” said Brady. “It’s clear there are many supporters who are passionate about our mission, and together, I am confident we can continue to positively impact the health of dogs everywhere.” 

Mr. Brady is a graduate of North Carolina State University with degrees in accounting, business management, and economics. He has worked in the nonprofit sector for 12 years, managing major fundraising events, stewardship programs, an endowment campaign, and serving as a major gifts officer.

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About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

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