Displaying items by tag: Alley Cat Allies

Talkin' Pets News

March 23, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Daisey Charlotte

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media / Production - Bob Page

Special Guest - MAMA’S LAST HUG Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves by author Frans de Waal will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 3/23/19 at 5pm ET to discuss and give away his new book

Give outdoor cats a helping paw this winter. Help us reach our goal of $20,000 by Dec. 18. Donate today!
 

Jon,

Cats are resourceful and resilient animals — but they still need help sometimes, especially during this time of year. We need to raise $20,000 by December 18 to help more cats and kittens this winter — can they count on your urgent support right now?

Cats can survive in the colder months, but sometimes well-meaning people bring them to shelters. And as you know, the vast majority of cats who enter shelters do not make it out alive.

Jon, you can save the lives of cats and kittens with an urgent winter gift to Alley Cat Allies. Please give the most generous gift you can right now — and together we can protect these animals during the winter season.

For the cats,

Becky Robinson   
Becky Robinson

Becky Robinson
President & Founder
Alley Cat Allies

P.S. Please make a gift by December 18 to Alley Cat Allies and save more cats this season.

Donate
 
 

Connect with us:

Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube
 
 
 
   
 
© 2018 Alley Cat Allies | All rights reserved.
7920 Norfolk Avenue, Suite 600, Bethesda, MD 20814
866-309-6207 | alleycat.org | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | Privacy Policy
 
 

Talkin' Pets News

December 15, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media / Production - Bob Page

Special Guest - Becky Robinson, President and Founder of alley Cat Allies joins Jon and Talkin' Pets at 5pm ET to discuss the cold weather and the TNR program

 

BETHESDA, Md., USA – Oct. 13, 2017 – Alley Cat Allies will celebrate the international premiere of Global Cat Day on Oct. 16, 2017, as a day for people around the world to stand up for policies that protect all cats in their communities. Participants are signing a pledge on GlobalCatDay.org to support advocacy efforts for all cats, including the cats who call the outdoors their home.

With the campaign already racing toward a goal of 100,000 people taking the pledge by year’s end, Alley Cat Allies president and founder Becky Robinson explained that the lasting impact of Global Cat Day will be a powerful message about protecting cats who live outside.

“Too often, local policies lead to cats being taken from the only home they’ve ever known – the outdoors,” Robinson said. “Community cats are no different from raccoons, otters or deer in that they are self-reliant animals who are totally comfortable outside with no need for human companionship. Global Cat Day is a turning point in helping more people to understand these essential facts about the cats living outside in their communities.”

GlobalCatDay.org includes short videos explaining the nature of community cats, plus the Global Cat Day pledge:

“I pledge to be an ally to cats, including those who call the outdoors their home. I will advocate for compassionate policies that protect every cat in my community.”

Global Cat Day has evolved from National Feral Cat Day®, which Alley Cat Allies created on its 10th anniversary in 2001 to raise awareness about community cats, promote Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR), and recognize the millions of compassionate Americans who care for them. Because compassion knows no borders, international participation in National Feral Cat Day grew each year, reaching at least 20 countries with last year’s edition. That mark has already been eclipsed this year, with engagement for the inaugural Global Cat Day coming from more than 40 countries, from Australia to the United Kingdom, Belgium to Brazil, Saudi Arabia to South Africa and many more.

“It’s very exciting that interest in advocating for outdoor cats is coming from so many corners of the globe, because it’s more evidence that this is now truly an international movement,” Robinson added.

Follow all the excitement for Global Cat Day on social media with the #GlobalCatDay hashtag.

###

 

About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the global engine of change for cats. We protect and improve cats’ lives through our innovative, cutting-edge programs. We are seen around the world as a champion for the humane treatment of all cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 650,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens worldwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

Alley Cat Allies Deploys Resources to Gulf Coast for Hurricane Recovery

HOUSTON – Sept. 3, 2017 – Alley Cat Allies has deployed an expert, bilingual disaster response team and is sending additional resources to help Texas and Louisiana organizations rescue cats and other animals whose lives continue to be in peril because of Hurricane Harvey.

“Many people and animals have been displaced, shelters are overflowing and families were forced to make difficult decisions about what to do with their animals,” said Becky Robinson, president and founder of Alley Cat Allies. “There are many cats and other animals who haven’t eaten for days and may be lost from their homes. We are eager to help the courageous people who are finding and saving these animals.”

In many cases, community cats, sometimes called feral cats, were left on their own when their human caregivers evacuated as floodwaters rose. The Alley Cat Allies team will help shelters and caregivers throughout Texas and Louisiana to rebuild programs that were in place to help community cats, including Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR). They will also be forming a network of people to check on colonies, resume feeding them and place new cat houses and shelters as necessary.

The Alley Cat Allies disaster response team is starting its work in Spring, a Houston suburb, by assisting the Texas Litter Control (TLC) organization. TLC requested help as a member of the Alley Cat Allies Feral Friends Network. Alley Cat Allies has brought truckloads of traps, dens and cat carriers, which will all be in high demand. Additional supplies such as leashes, cat food, kitty litter, water, blankets and towels are also being delivered.

In Texas and Louisiana, Alley Cat Allies is offering emergency funds to overwhelmed shelters and organizations. In one such case, the Humane Society of Louisiana (HSLA) has used these funds for two disaster-ready transportation vehicles that are facilitating the rescue of hundreds of animals stranded by floodwaters. Jeff Dorson, executive director of HSLA, thanked Alley Cat Allies for helping in a second consecutive year, after the organization previously responded to extreme flooding in 2016.

“Once more, Alley Cat Allies has come to our aid in a time of need,” Dorson said. “This critical support is helping us to save cats and other animals who need our help. The generosity, partnership and good-will are helping us to get through some very challenging days as we try to do as much good as we can.”

Alley Cat Allies will post updates about its hurricane relief efforts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, and donations to support its work can be made online at www.alleycat.org.

###

About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the global engine of change for cats. We protect and improve cats’ lives through our innovative, cutting-edge programs. We are seen around the world as a champion for the humane treatment of all cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 650,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens worldwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

Hurricane Preparation Tips for Pet Owners, Cat Caregivers in Path of Irma

BETHESDA, Md. – Sept. 6, 2017 – As Hurricane Irma approaches Florida and the Southeastern United States, Alley Cat Allies, the international advocacy organization dedicated to protecting cats, has assembled a set of Disaster Preparation Tips for community cat caregivers, pet owners, and others involved with animals. These tips will help community cat caregivers and pet owners in the path of Irma weather the storm and keep their cats safe. Among the tips:

  1. Make sure to have descriptions of your pets and the community cats (sometimes called feral cats) you care for, along with photos. If you need to look for displaced cats in shelters or other rescue areas, this will help accurately identify them. Make sure all pet tags and animal microchips have up-to-date information.
  2. Enlist a back-up caregiver who is responsible for the community cats in your absence, and network with other community cat caregivers in your area to set up a ‘buddy system.’ This will create a safety net of care for the cats. You may be able to find other cat caregivers in your area through our Feral Friends Network.
  3. Create an emergency contact card for your pets and community cat colonies in case you are not immediately available. Include all contact information for your substitute caregiver. Carry this card in your wallet and your car, give copies to your backup caregiver, and post it somewhere visible in your home like on the refrigerator.
  4. Make a list of local shelters and their contact information. You will need this information in case you need their help or resources.
  5. Keep an emergency supply kit on hand and know where to find it quickly. Disaster kit basics for pets include a pet first-aid kit, a supply of prescription medications for pets, veterinary and microchip ID records, three to seven days of pet food and dishes, a seven-day supply of bottled water per person and per pet, a litter box and litter, a leash and collar, crate or carrier, blankets, and photos of pets and cats in colonies.

It’s not possible to bring community cats with you when evacuating from disasters, so they need their own special disaster plan. Read our Disaster Proofing a Community Cat Colony resource for guidance.

Finally, you can always reach out to Feral Friends Network members in your area for help in preparing community cats for a disaster or finding them after the danger has passed.

With an active Atlantic hurricane season now under way, it’s important to have a disaster readiness plan in place.  

# # #

 

Local events listed at: NationalFeralCatDay.org/actions

 

BETHESDA, Md., USA – Oct. 10, 2016 – Cat advocates have scheduled over 1,000 events worldwide to join Alley Cat Allies in celebrating the 16th anniversary of National Feral Cat Day on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. Inspired by this year’s theme, “All Cats All Communities,” supporters from around the world are advocating for the lives of cats and educating their communities about humane policies, like Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR), that help save cats’ lives and protect all cats in all communities.

“For more than 26 years, Alley Cat Allies has been leading the movement to protect and improve the lives of cats everywhere, and this year’s National Feral Cat Day theme reflects that,” said Becky Robinson, president and founder of Alley Cat Allies. “From the pet cats in your home to the outdoor cats in communities around the world, all cats deserve our care and protection. Together, we are creating change that saves their lives.”

A full listing of events in local communities is located atNationalFeralCatDay.org/actions. Supporters worldwide have organized more events this year than any in the 16-year history of National Feral Cat Day. Volunteers in every corner of the world are holding spay/neuter clinics and food and supply drives, arranging educational sessions, hosting adoption events, encouraging official governmental proclamations, and raising funds to support local TNR programs.

Even if you have just five minutes available, there is still time to get involved and help raise awareness about the issues that impact all cats. Visit NationalFeralCatDay.org/ideas to see simple suggestions such as signing a pledge to protect the lives of cats, sharing a selfie on social media to display your National Feral Cat Day pride, or reading a newsletter. Visit www.NationalFeralCatDay.org/gear and find educational materials to inform others, and gear to show off your National Feral Cat Day pride.

Alley Cat Allies, the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the humane treatment of cats, launched National Feral Cat Day 2001 as a call to action to raise awareness about community cats, promote TNR as the only effective method of stabilizing cat populations, and empower and mobilize the millions of compassionate Americans who care about cats everywhere.

Follow all the activities for National Feral Cat Day on social media with the #feralcatday hashtag.

###

About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 600,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens worldwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

 

It’s a 1,000 year flood. Hundreds of miles of Louisiana are underwater—and animals across the affected areas of the state are calling out for your help. While rescue efforts have been underway all week for both people and animals alike, cats are often the overlooked victims in disasters like this. That’s why Alley Cat Allies is going to make sure that this time, no cat is overlooked. Right now, Alley Cat Allies is providing emergency funds to local boots on the ground activists, with the help of the Humane Society of Louisiana, to pay for necessary supplies including a boat. But we need your emergency donations to support our disaster rescue efforts. The cats in harm’s way simply can’t wait. Every hour that passes is an hour that cat victims of the flood risk drowning before help arrives. Every day that passes is a day a cat who survived the floods faces starvation before a helping hand can feed them. Your emergency support right now ensures Alley Cat Allies can continue to provide immediate aid to local Louisiana groups and shelters impacted by this devastation. But how many cats we can save is up to you, Katie. Please make your emergency donation right now to support our Louisiana disaster rescue efforts. Thank you! For the cats, Becky Robinson
President & Founder
Alley Cat Allies

Donate

May Edition

Thanks to your support, we’ve been busy this month protecting cats around the country. Here are just a few of our current projects and topics of interest:

eNews dotted line divider

Hearing Held on Kristen Lindsey’s Veterinary License

eNews_KristenLindsey-and-Attorney.jpg Kristen Lindsey—the veterinarian who killed a cat with a bow and arrow and bragged about it on Facebook—fought to keep her veterinary license in a two-day hearing on April 25 and 26 before the Texas Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners. Alley Cat Allies was present, and we reported from the scene on each day’s important proceedings. Witnesses for each side, and Lindsey herself, testified about the cat victim, Lindsey’s professional character, and her right to continue practicing. Closing statements are due June 10 and a decision is expected in the Fall. Read the day by day recounts of the Kristen Lindsey hearing.

eNews dotted line divider

From the Field in Harford County, Maryland

Leaping Kitten The Humane Society of Harford County is making great strides to protect cats! Alley Cat Allies helped shelter staff implement a Shelter-Neuter-Return program that is keeping community cats out of the shelter and saving their lives. Our Campaigns Manager, Kayla Christiano, along with Program Manager: Animal Control and Shelter Liaison, Alice Burton traveled to Harford County in April to tour the Humane Society’s brand new facility and check in on their program. Over 30 cats have already been saved since late December. Plans are underway to have a workshop for shelter staff.  Read more about the Harford County Humane Society visit.

eNews dotted line divider

From the Field in Mesquite, Texas

eNews_FromTheField_Mesquite.jpg We’re working hard to help Mesquite, Texas save more cats. In April, our Campaigns Manager Kayla Christiano and Staff Attorney Molly Armus traveled to Mesquite to teach shelter staff and community members how to protect cats. They visited the Mesquite Animal Shelter and Adoption Center to advise staff on humane policies for cats, and hold a workshop to prepare them for the community’s common concerns. They also held a workshop for local residents to show them what they can do to help their community cats. Read more about Kayla and Molly’s adventures in Mesquite.

eNews dotted line divider

The Life of a Kitten Ain’t Easy

Leaping Kitten From hilarious cat videos to the newest movie star Keanu, we celebrate kittens every day in our pop culture. But are we doing enough to protect those kittens when their births peak in the spring and summer? The truth is animal shelters can’t keep up with the extra care that young kittens need, so most kittens are, sadly, killed. Fortunately, there are policies and programs that can help save lives. Learn how you and your local shelter can save kittens.

eNews dotted line divider

Adoptable Cat: CatCat

AdoptMe_CatCat.jpg CatCat is a playful and affectionate one-year-old boy. A family came home one day to find that he had snuck in through their doggie door and fallen asleep on their bed. Now he’s ready to find a home he can really call his own. CatCat loves chasing toys and watching the birds. He can even coo like a pigeon! If you’re looking for an independent but sweet cat who loves to be petted, CatCat is the one for you. Find out how you can adopt CatCat today.

eNews dotted line divider

Quick Links

Leaping Kitten

We’ll be at the HSUS Animal Care Expo in Las Vegas. Come out on May 11—14 for the largest animal care education conference. Learn more about the conference.

Don’t miss the Helping Cats in Your Community Webinar on May 18. Learn what you can do to save cats’ lives. Register for the webinar.

Come do some Spring cleaning for the Boardwalk Cats! The Atlantic City Boardwalk Cleanup is on May 21. Volunteer to help the cats get ready for the warm weather.

 

AUSTIN, Texas (April 27, 2016) — A state administrative court has concluded a two-day hearing on whether Kristin Lindsey will lose her Texas veterinary license after shooting an arrow through a cat’s head, posting a picture of it on Facebook and bragging about the killing. A ruling is expected later this year.

Misty Christo, an attorney with Alley Cat Allies, was in the hearing room in Austin for both days of testimony about Tiger, the cat that Lindsey killed. The Texas Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners argued that the cat who was killed was in fact Tiger, was owned, and was killed without his owners’ consent.

“It was shocking to hear testimony confirming that Tiger was still alive in the picture that Kristen Lindsey posted on Facebook,” Christo said. “The testimony demonstrated in terrible detail how much Tiger suffered from her cruelty.”

“And regardless of any questions about whether this cat was Tiger, it was completely unacceptable for a veterinarian to kill him this way. Kristen Lindsey betrayed the trust that we place in veterinarians to care for animals. The information from this hearing emphatically reaffirmed that her veterinary license should be revoked forever. She should never care for an animal again.”

Alley Cat Allies has posted more details about the testimony and pictures from the hearing here: https://www.alleycat.org/news-april2016-kristen-lindsey-hearing.

As the nation’s only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats, Alley Cat Allies has followed the case from the beginning, called for action against Lindsey and offered testimony in preliminary hearings.

Attorneys in the case have until June 10 to file closing briefs to the court. Reply briefs will then be due by July 1. Alley Cat Allies will continue to follow the case and share new developments and the ruling as they occur.

 

About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 600,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens nationwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.


BETHESDA, Md., USA – April 12, 2016 – As springtime begins so does “kitten season” – when babies are born to cats who have not yet been spayed or neutered. People don’t always know the best way to help these kittens. Sometimes taking home a kitten found outdoors is the best way to help and sometimes it’s best to leave them outdoors with mom – it all depends on the situation.

“If you come across a kitten outdoors, you may be tempted to bring her home with you, but that may not be the best thing for the kitten,” said Becky Robinson, president and founder of Alley Cat Allies. “Deciding whether to take a kitten home with you or leave her where she is should be carefully considered based on the individual kitten’s situation and age.”

Alley Cat Allies, the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the humane treatment of cats, offers five easy ways people can help cats and kittens this spring. Visitwww.alleycat.org/Kittensfor a comprehensive guide to caring for kittens.

Tip #1: Leave kittens with mom.

Like all babies, kittens are best left with their mothers who instinctively know how to help their offspring grow up to be strong and healthy cats. Neonatal kittens, four weeks old or younger, need around the clock attention and depend on mom for 100 percent of their care. Kittens five to eight weeks old can begin to eat wet food but are still being weaned. (To determine the age of a kitten, use Alley Cat Allies’ Kitten Progression Guide at www.alleycat.org/KittenProgression.)

If you know the mother is present, it is best to leave kittens with her. To determine whether the mother is caring for the kittens, wait and observe for two to four hours to see if the mother returns. She could just be out looking for food. If she doesn’t return, the kittens could be abandoned. A young kitten living outdoors who does not have a mother present should be taken in and fostered.

If you are unsure, Alley Cat Allies has a number of resources available to help. The Alley Cat Allies’ National Cat Help Desk can provide advice and direction for a number of situations. Another option is the Alley Cat Allies’ Feral Friends Network – local individuals and organizations that may be able to help with hands-on advice, information about borrowing equipment, and veterinarians or clinics that can spay and neuter feral cats. To request a list of Feral Friends in your area, visit www.alleycat.org/FeralFriends

Tip #2: Don’t bring neonatal kittens to an animal shelter.

Most shelters are not equipped or trained to provide the necessary round-the-clock care for neonatal kittens. If a kitten can’t eat on her own, she will likely be killed at the shelter. Realistically, it’s never a good idea to take a cat to a shelter, no matter the age or level of socialization. There are some shelters who have lifesaving programs for cats, but across the nation, more than 70 percent of cats who enter shelters are killed. That number rises to virtually 100 percent for feral cats. Killing is never the answer—it is inhumane and it fails to stabilize or reduce outdoor cat populations.

Tip #3: Volunteer as a kitten foster parent for a local rescue group.

There are kitten foster parent programs across the country. Though it is an investment of time and requires training, volunteering to foster young kittens is lifesaving and rewarding. To learn the basics of kitten care, register for Alley Cat Allies’ free “Help! I found a kitten!” webinar at www.alleycat.org/KittenWebinar.

Tip #4: Support and practice Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR).

TNR is the only effective and humane way of stabilizing and reducing community cat populations. In a TNR program, community cats are humanely trapped and brought to a veterinarian to be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and eartipped (the universal symbol that a cat has been neutered and vaccinated) before being returned to their outdoor homes. Learn more about TNR at www.alleycat.org/TNR.

Spaying and neutering community cats prevents new litters, drastically reducing the impact of kitten season. Cats as young as four months can have litters, so it is important to spay and neuter kittens as soon as they are ready. A good rule of thumb is the 2 Pound Spay/Neuter Rule – kittens can be safely spayed or neutered at two months of age or as soon as they weigh two pounds. Learn more about pediatric spay and neuter at www.alleycat.org/spayneuter.  

Tip #5: Advocate for policies and programs that protect cats.

Contact your shelter and local officials and tell them you support lifesaving policies for cats, including spay and neuter funding and spay and neuter before adoption. Write letters and call in support of community outreach and education programs that spread awareness about spay and neuter, community cats and TNR – you can make a big difference. Learn how you can help your local shelter save more cats’ lives at www.alleycat.org/HelpShelters.

 

###

About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 600,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens worldwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

Page 1 of 3