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How Canine Hip Dysplasia May Unlock the Mysteries of Human DDH Featured

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How Canine Hip Dysplasia May Unlock the Mysteries of Human DDH

Modern medicine is increasingly turning to pets for answers, and when it comes to understanding the poor development of hips prone to dislocation, dogs may play an important part to gaining further insight. A December 2017 study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research positioned canine hip dysplasia (CHD) as a model to help scientists better understand developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in humans. Here's what you need to know:

What Is Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD)?

Canine hip dysplasia, or CHD, is a condition where a dog's hips are improperly developed. It causes the hip to get loose and deteriorate as your dog ages. It's a hereditary condition that's common in large breed dogs, too. Dog breeds that are prone to this condition include German Shepherds, Labrador retrievers, Great Danes, Irish Setters, and St. Bernards. However, small and medium-sized dogs can experience CHD, too. External factors, such as the weight of your dog, his diet, and excessive growth, impact CHD.

How CHD Is Treated

There are a number of treatments that can help manage pain and other ailments that come along with canine hip dysplasia. For example, your pet can receive physical therapy and surgery to correct CHD. You can also use discount pet medication, including the Carprofen Caplets, offered via reputable online pet pharmacies and medication suppliers, such as Allivet.

What Is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) in Humans and How Is It Treated?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip in humans is a condition that is most commonly identified during birth and can also develop during the first year of a person's life. It involves an improperly developed hip joint, which can lead to a dislocated, dislocatable, or loose hip. It's also linked to pain in the hip and secondary osteoarthritis or OA. It also can limit your movements.

This condition can be treated non-surgically by repositioning the thigh bone with a special harness. However, surgery is often necessary the older a DDH patient gets or if the repositioning of the thighbone is unsuccessful. While surgery has certainly improved the results of the condition over the last 10 years, scientists still lack a full understanding of the causes and effects of the condition, the diseases common behaviors, and how changes in cells' and tissues' mechanical properties and physical forces play a role in the development of DDH.

How CHD and DDH Link

Scientists believe that by studying CHD, they can find an answer to not only the specific paths of that start the degeneration of hip joints of those with DDH but also plausible alternative treatments. Links between CHD and DDH provide insight. Here are some commonalities between both diseases:

  • Both are hereditary and Pre-OA. Just as CHD is hereditary, DDH also is likely to run in families. Also, if CHD is not treated, it can progress into OA, similar to how untreated DDH can progress into secondary OA.
  • CHD and DDH approaches to treatment share similarities. The approach to treating CHD and DDH is similar. Both humans and dogs can modify their diet and movement to better manage the condition. Surgery is also an option for both dogs and humans.
  • Weight plays an important role. Treating DDH by managing weight is similar to the treatment of CHD. That's because extra weight adds extra pressure on the joint in the case of both dogs and people. Losing weight can help reduce this pressure and the discomfort that comes along with it.

Turning to Your Pet for Answers

Looking to your family history for answers to current conditions and diseases may not be the only option to unlocking life's mysteries of modern science. Modern science is turning to your pet. Using CHD as a model and understanding CHD it may uncover valuable insight that leads to better treatment options in DDH.

Lannie, writer for Allivet. Allivet provides affordable pet supplies and pet medications, all of which can be purchased online. Listed below are some helpful resources referenced in the article that can provide some guidance for those looking for helpful information on pet supplies & medication:

http://www.allivet.com/p-5632-carprofen-caplets.aspx

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