Displaying items by tag: dogs

 

Brachycephalic breeds are getting more and more popularity these days and you probably think they are cute too. These breeds include the Pekinese, Pug, French Bulldog, Shih Tzu, Boston Terrier and more. It is important for people and future owners to know that behind that cute and irresistible look, these dogs have quite few health problems.


The reason for the health problems

If you look closely at the anatomy of their head, you will notice they have flat face and their skull is wide. This seems like their skull has been compressed and even in some dogs the nose can be unapparent.

This confrontation can cause problems in three main systems: the respiratory system, the skin and the eyes.

The most noticeable problem for these dogs is the breathing. Have you ever noticed how a pug breathes? Or more accurate, how they fight for a breath sometimes? Have you ever heard them snoring and thought it was so adorable? Well, for them personally it isn’t. It is like you having stuck nose and having difficult time breathing.

BUAOS - Brachycephalic Upper Airway Obstructive Syndrome

The name of the respiratory disorders in brachycephalic dogs is Brachycephalic Upper Airway Obstructive Syndrome. What actually happened is that the skull and the space inside the skull got smaller, however the soft tissues, most importantly the soft palate, the tongue remained the same size. This is what causes the breathing problems in brachycephalic breeds.

Problems of the skin

You have probably noticed by now that these breeds have folded skin on their faces. These folds are the best place for yeasts and bacteria to grow and you guessed it- they cause infections and skin inflammations. The folds are formed because of the excessive skin covering the face.

Problems of the eyes

It is well known that brachycephalic breeds are more prone to eye problems than other dogs, just because of their skull anatomy. Their eyeballs protrude significantly, compared to other breeds, and this is because their eye sockets are too shallow. This results in more frequent eye traumas, dry eyes, ulcers.

Brachycephalic dogs have a very nice character and they are amazing pets; however, we can’t disregard their health and what is best for their well-being. If you are planning to become a pet owner of any of these breeds it is very important to know about their health and what owning a brachycephalic dog means. If you would like to learn more about these dogs, you can continue reading about “Problems associated with Brachycephalic Dogs”.

 

New York, NYTo celebrate the dogs who do extraordinary things in the service of humankind, the AKC Humane FundSM is seeking YOUR nominations for its AKC Humane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence (ACE). Nominations are now open and winners will be announced in the fall of 2019.  

Each year, the AKC Humane Fund pays tribute to five dedicated, hardworking dogs for making significant contributions to an individual or entire community. Since its creation in 2000, 95 ACE awards have been presented to dogs of various breeds, including one mixed-breed dog, from states across the nation. Former ACE recipients have included a Great Dane who helps his young owner walk and a family companion who fought for his life after protecting a seven-year-old from a rattlesnake, among dozens of other extraordinary dogs.


“There is no shortage of incredible dogs who have touched the lives of individuals or communities,” said Doug Ljungren, President of the AKC Humane Fund. “These canine heroes make our world a better place and we’re proud to honor five of them each year with the ACE awards.”

One award is given in each of the following five categories:

Uniformed Service K-9

Eligibility: Full-time working K-9s in the realms of city, county, state, or federal law enforcement; the military; firefighting; customs and border patrol; emergency services.

Exemplary Companion

Eligibility: Dogs without formal training or certification that have nonetheless distinguished themselves in some way and have made a meaningful contribution to their owners or communities.

 

 

Search and Rescue

Eligibility: Dogs certified to assist in wilderness and urban tracking, natural disasters, mass casualty events and locating missing people.

Therapy

Eligibility: Certified therapy dogs working in hospitals, schools, disaster sites, war zones, and wherever else the affection of a good dog can provide comfort.

Service

Eligibility: Service dogs who enrich the lives of physically or mentally disabled owners, including, but not limited to, guide dogs for the blind, seizure-alert dogs, hearing dogs, balance dogs.

**(Note: Nominees doing therapy work without certification are considered in the Exemplary Companion category.)

Honorees will receive an engraved sterling-silver medallion and an all-expenses-paid trip for dog and owner to Orlando, Florida, to be honored at the AKC National Championship presented by Royal Canin in December. A donation of $1,000 will also be made in each recipient’s name to the pet-related charity of their choice.

Anyone, including the dog’s owner or handler, may submit a nomination form

Submissions for the AKC Humane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence for 2019 must include:

  • A digital photograph of the dog. Files must be larger than1MB in size and a minimum of 300 dpi. The photo should feature solely the nominated dog.
  • A 500-word-or-less description of how the dog has demonstrated excellence.
  • Dog’s call name, breed, age and sex.
  • Owner’s/Nominator's name(s), address and phone number. E-mail address if available.

Nominations will be accepted through July 31, 2019 and should be submitted here, with a photo sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

For more information about the ACE awards or to nominate a dog, visit the AKC Humane Fund Awards For Canine Excellence (ACE)page.

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The AKC Humane FundSM promotes responsible pet ownership through education, outreach and grant-making. Through its programs, the AKC Humane Fund supports Parent Club Rescue activities; assists shelters for domestic abuse victims that permit pets and provides resources for responsible dog ownership education. Contributions to the AKC Humane Fund are fully tax deductible as allowed by law under Section 501(c)(3) of the IRS Code.

 

The American Kennel Club, founded in 1884, is a not-for-profit organization which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

To become a fan of the AKC on Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com/americankennelclub. To follow the AKC on Twitter, go to http://www.twitter.com/akcdoglovers.

 

New York, N.Y. –The American Kennel Club (AKC®), the world’s largest purebred dog registry and advocate for all dogs, continues its commitment to students pursuing their education in veterinary studies with the announcement of the 2019 AKC Veterinary Outreach Scholarship recipients.

This scholarship is designed to support individuals with a background of participation in AKC events and programs, who seek to promote animal health and medicine. A total of $35,000 in scholarship money was awarded.

Recipients of the AKC Veterinary Outreach Scholarship are: Julia O’Rourke (Purdue University), Courtney Wicker (North Carolina State University), Holly Arnold (Oregon State University), Hannah Loonsk (University of Pennsylvania), Tyler Myers (North Carolina State University), Julia Zuercher (Virginia-Maryland Regional College), Corene Bruhns (Cornell University), Emily Eppler (Kansas State), Kaitlin Gonzales (Oregon State University), Therese Millet (University of Illinois), Dylan DeProspero (North Carolina State University), Kaitlyn Dreese (University of Pennsylvania), Alison Folsom (Tufts University), Gabrielle Rands (Mississippi State University), Charlotte Wissel (University of Florida).

“The recipients of this scholarship are truly dedicated to the world of purebred dogs and the health and well-being of animals. They have worked hard to balance their demanding school schedules with participation in AKC events,” said Mari-Beth O’Neill, VP of Sport Services. “We are very proud of them and look forward to seeing their impact on the future of veterinary medicine.”

 

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About the American Kennel Club

Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization, which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.


Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers

 

 

WASHINGTON, D.C., May 28, 2019 – The American Humane Rescue team, first to serve in saving and sheltering animals for more than 100 years, has deployed with a veterinarian, trained swift and floodwater responders, rescue boats, critical medical and sheltering supplies, and one of its giant 50-foot animal rescue vehicles to save animals caught in the deadly Oklahoma floods.

The American Humane Rescue team responded at the official request of Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, and is now engaged in search-and-rescue and flood/slack water operations, assisting both companion animals and farm animals in need. The team has been navigating the floodwaters in the Muskogee area, saving multiple cats and dogs alongside the fire department and Code 3 Associates, Oklahoma Large Animal First Responders, Muskogee Animal Control and Sheltering, and the Humane Emergency Animal Response Team.

American Humane, the country’s first national humane organization, has a long history of helping animals in Oklahoma. The group deployed following devastating flooding in Tulsa in 1984, a tornado outbreak in 1999, and the devastating 2013 EF-5 tornado in Moore, after which the team spent more than a month rescuing, sheltering, and reuniting hundreds of animals. On the third anniversary of the Moore tornado, American Humane, with funding from the Kirkpatrick Foundation and the Donner Foundation, placed a giant, new 50-foot animal emergency vehicle in Oklahoma City. That vehicle, which carries a contingent of highly trained rescue experts, boats, and lifesaving medical supplies donated by Zoetis Petcare.

            As emergency responders continue to help people and animals, pet owners need to know that even though the storm has passed, the dangers have not. Here, for all those affected by the flooding, are some important tips from the experts on the American Humane Rescue team:

 

After the storm

  • Make sure the storm has fully passed before going outside and assess damage before allowing children or animals out.
  • Keep dogs on a leash and cats in a carrier, and children close at hand. Displaced objects and fallen trees can disorient pets and sharp debris could harm them.
  • Give pets time to become re-oriented. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and cause a pet to become confused or lost.
  • Keep kids and animals away from hazards such as downed power lines and water that may be contaminated.
  • Uncertainty and change in the environment affect animals, presenting new stresses and dangers. Your pet’s behavior may change after a crisis, becoming more aggressive or self-protective. Be sensitive to these changes and keep more room between them, other animals, children or strangers. Animals need comforting, too. Comfort your pet with kind words and lots of pats or hugs. If possible, provide a safe and quiet environment, even if it is not their own home.
 

“Storms like these can be deadly for pets who are separated from their families,” said Robin Ganzert, PhD, president and CEO of American Humane. “It is important that every person and pet parent heed these lifesaving tips in the aftermath of this destructive storm. We are working to help all of our friends in Oklahoma to stay safe in this disaster.”

To support the American Humane Rescue team’s lifesaving work, please visit:  www.AmericanHumane.org/oklahoma-rescue.

 

PHOTO CAPTION FOR ATTACHED PICTURE:  “The American Humane Rescue team, Code 3 Associates, and firefighters from Webber’s Falls saving animals caught in the deadly Oklahoma floods” 

 

PHOTO CREDIT: Joshua Morton for American Humane

 

About American Humane

American Humane is the country’s first national humane organization, founded in 1877, and the first to serve animals in disasters and cruelty cases. Visit American Humane at www.americanhumane.org today.

 

About the American Humane Rescue program

The American Humane Rescue program was created in 1916 at the request of the U.S. Secretary of War to save war horses wounded on the battlefields of World War I Europe.  Since then, Red Star has been rescuing animals of every kind and have been involved in virtually every major disaster relief effort from Pearl Harbor to 9/11, the Joplin, Missouri and Moore, Oklahoma tornadoes, the Japanese and Haitian earthquakes, Hurricanes Katrina, Sandy, Harvey, Maria and Michael, and the California wildfires. The American Humane Rescue team saved, sheltered and fed more than 600,000 animals in the past year alone.

 

 

On behalf of the Universal Pictures release of THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2, we want you to share the secret life of your pet by uploading a photo and adding a funny message about your pet’s ‘secret life.’

https://www.thesecretlifeofmypet.com/#/

Can’t wait to see your pets “secret lives” along with #TheSecretLifeofPets2

THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2 opens nationwide on Friday, June 7.

 

 

New York, NY- The American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog is pleased to announce that the official bronze statue of Sgt. Stubby, a distinguished World War I war dog will be housed permanently at the AKC Museum of the Dog. The sculpture will be unveiled on May 23, 2019.

The statue, “Stubby Salutes,” created by renowned sculptor Susan Bahary, is a life sized bronze of the bull terrier mix. Stubby is widely regarded as the U.S Army’s first service dog. His service began in 1917 when he wandered on to the camp of the 102nd Infantry Regiment of the 26th Yankee Division at Yale. He formed a bond with a young solider named Robert Conroy who named him “Stubby.” Conroy subsequently smuggled Stubby on his ship when it was time to ship out. Stubby served in France for 18 months and a total of 17 battles. His heroic feats included: warning his unit of looming mustard gas attacks, locating wounded soldiers on the battlefield and sitting beside them until help arrived, and capturing a German spy by grabbing at the seat of his pants. Over the course of his service, he was injured by mustard gas and a grenade. Stubby is remembered for his bravery and also as a treasured mascot who brought joy to embattled soldiers. As a veteran, he was awarded a medal for his bravery by General John J. Pershing and met three presidents.

This April marked the 100th anniversary of Stubby’s return to the US to a hero’s welcome.

“We are very excited to welcome “Stubby Salutes” to our Museum collection,” said Alan Fausel, Executive Director of the AKC Museum of the Dog. “His courage and dedication to our country has laid the foundation for today’s military working dogs and we look forward to sharing him with the public and educating them about his place in history.”

Susan Bahary, an internationally acclaimed artist, was commissioned by the descendants of Robert Conroy to memorialize Stubby in his rare salute pose, a pose which won him the favor of his fellow soldiers and officers. Her other works include “Always Faithful,” the United States first official war dog monument that commemorated the 25 dogs who perished in the taking of Guam during World War II. “Always Faithful” is a part of the Museum of the Dog’s collection.

“It has been an honor to create this bronze monument to commemorate Sgt. Stubby,” says Bahary. "His right paw represents his deeds for our country and his left paw represents his friendly and giving nature. His contributions to our military, along with his loyalty and bravery are symbolic of all the wonderful working dogs that protect us and service animals that benefit and enrich our lives today.”

The AKC Museum of the Dog, founded in 1982, was originally housed in The New York Life Building located at 51 Madison Avenue as part of the AKC Headquarters. In 1987, the Museum was moved to West St. Louis County, MO. The Museum made its return to New York City in a new location in February 2019 and houses one of the largest repositories of canine art in the world, including paintings, porcelains, bronzes, trophies and digital displays. The Museum is dedicated to education and preservation of purebred dogs.

The original casting of the sculpture is on permanent display at the “Connecticut Trees of Honor” Memorial at the Veterans Memorial Park In Middletown, CT. 

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About the AKC Museum of the Dog

Founded in 1982, The AKC Museum of the Dog is dedicated to the collection, preservation, exhibition, and interpretation of the art, artifacts and literature of the dog for the purposes of education, historical perspective, aesthetic enjoyment and to enhance the appreciation for and knowledge of the significance of the dog and the human/canine relationship. Located in New York City, the Museum is home to several hundred paintings, drawings, watercolors, prints, sculptures, bronzes, and porcelain figurines, a variety of decorative arts objects and interactive displays depicting man's best friend throughout the ages. The AKC Museum of the Dog is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization funded mainly by private and corporate gift donations.

For more information on the AKC Museum of the Dog visit www.Museumofthedog.org

Become a fan of the AKC Museum of the Dog on Facebook at akcmuseumofthedog

 

 

Movie review written by Jon Patch with 3 out of 4 paws

A Dog’s Journey

Universal Pictures, DreamWorks, Walden Media and Amblin Entertainment present a PG, 108 minute, Adventure, Comedy, Drama, directed by Gail Mancuso, written and book by W. Bruce Cameron with a theater release date of May 17, 2019.

Disabled War Veteran Repays Service Dog
Organization, by Inventing New Chew-Toy andDonating All ProfitsBig Dog’s Powerful Bite Helps Re-Invent the Rubber Ball
Two remarkable stories of determination and persistence come from the
household of disabled war veteran James Hayes, who has a service dog, an
85 LB German-Shepherd named Barrett.
Barrett was given to James by Dogs4Warriors, an organization that helps
veterans cope with Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress
Disorder, both of which James suffers from, after 3 combat tours in Iraq
and Afghanistan.
James and Barrett quickly developed a close bond, but there was a
potentially dangerous problem – Barrett routinely tore apart the toughest
of chew toys, including those dubbed “indestructible”. So James set his
sights on finding a stronger, safer product for his new best friend.“Veterans Twice as Likely to Start Their Own Company”
James refused to give up in his quest for a toy that even a determined dog
like Barrett could enjoy, but not destroy.
Unable to find any suitable product, James proved U.S. Sen. Tammy
Duckworth D-Ill. correct, when she explained why veterans are twice as
likely to start or lead their own companies as civilians:
“Those who’ve worn the uniform have a kind of courage instilled in them”
said the senator, herself a retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel. “The
type of resilience and determination that can turn a long-shot idea into a
profit-making business.”James had never heard of Sen. Duckworth, but proving her right, he had
already contacted a variety of manufacturers. James now has a patent
pending on the unique manufacturing process he developed to produce a
completely solid indestructible rubber ball
His quest ended when he found Ethical Products in Bloomfield, NJ. They
were the first company willing and able to help produce James’s re-
designed ball, and to also do something quite profound with their profits…
Ethical Products Inc Donating All Profits to Dogs4Warriors
Deeply impressed by the service, sacrifice and determination of both James
and Barrett, the company made a remarkable move of their own, offering to
donate not just a percentage, but all their profits on the sale of The
Barrett Ball to the Dogs4Warriors organization that matched James with his
beloved dog, Barrett.
To Learn More or Purchase a Barrett Ball
Named after James’s beloved dog, the Barrett Ball will be available in
small, medium and large sizes, priced from $6.99 to $29.99 and comes with
a 100% lifetime guarantee.
For more information download our Press Kit. Pre-order will be available
on www.thebarrettball.com, though the new Barrett Ball will be officially
launched at the Global Pet Expo on March 20-22 in Orlando. The Barrett
Ball will be shipping to stores and websites in late April.ABOUT:
Ethical Products Inc. www.ethicalpet.com
Dogs 4 Warriors, Inc www.dog4warriors.org

 

New York, NY- The American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog is pleased to announce that the official bronze statue of Sgt. Stubby, a distinguished World War I war dog will be housed permanently at the AKC Museum of the Dog. The sculpture will be unveiled on May 23, 2019.

The statue, “Stubby Salutes,” created by renowned sculptor Susan Bahary, is a life sized bronze of the bull terrier mix. Stubby is widely regarded as the U.S Army’s first service dog. His service began in 1917 when he wandered on to the camp of the 102nd Infantry Regiment of the 26th Yankee Division at Yale. He formed a bond with a young solider named Robert Conroy who named him “Stubby.” Conroy subsequently smuggled Stubby on his ship when it was time to ship out. Stubby served in France for 18 months and a total of 17 battles. His heroic feats included: warning his unit of looming mustard gas attacks, locating wounded soldiers on the battlefield and sitting beside them until help arrived, and capturing a German spy by grabbing at the seat of his pants. Over the course of his service, he was injured by mustard gas and a grenade. Stubby is remembered for his bravery and also as a treasured mascot who brought joy to embattled soldiers. As a veteran, he was awarded a medal for his bravery by General John J. Pershing and met three presidents.

This April marked the 100th anniversary of Stubby’s return to the US to a hero’s welcome.

“We are very excited to welcome “Stubby Salutes” to our Museum collection,” said Alan Fausel, Executive Director of the AKC Museum of the Dog. “His courage and dedication to our country has laid the foundation for today’s military woking dogs and we look forward to sharing him with the public and educating them about his place in history.”

Susan Bahary, an internationally acclaimed artist, was commissioned by the decendants of Robert Conroy to memorialize Stubby in his rare salute pose, a pose which won him the favor of his fellow soldiers and officers. Her other works include “Always Faithful,” the United States first official war dog momument that commemorated the 25 dogs who perished in the taking of Guam during World War II. “Always Faithful” is a part of the Museum of the Dog’s collection.

“It has been an honor to create this bronze monument to commemorate Sgt. Stubby,” says Bahary. "His right paw represents his deeds for our country and his left paw represents his friendly and giving nature. His contributions to our military, along with his loyalty and bravery are symbolic of all the wonderful working dogs that protect us and service animals that benefit and enrich our lives today.”

The AKC Museum of the Dog, founded in 1982, was originally housed in The New York Life Building located at 51 Madison Avenue as part of the AKC Headquarters. In 1987, the Museum was moved to West St. Louis County, MO. The Museum made its return to New York City in a new location in February 2019 and houses one of the largest repositories of canine art in the world, including paintings, porcelains, bronzes, trophies and digital displays. The Museum is dedicated to education and preservation of purebred dogs.

The original casting of the sculpture is on permanent display at the “Connecticut Trees of Honor” Memorial at the Veterans Memorial Park In Middletown, CT 

###

About the AKC Museum of the Dog

Founded in 1982, The AKC Museum of the Dog is dedicated to the collection, preservation, exhibition, and interpretation of the art, artifacts and literature of the dog for the purposes of education, historical perspective, aesthetic enjoyment and to enhance the appreciation for and knowledge of the significance of the dog and the human/canine relationship. Located in New York City, the Museum is home to several hundred paintings, drawings, watercolors, prints, sculptures, bronzes, and porcelain figurines, a variety of decorative arts objects and interactive displays depicting man's best friend throughout the ages. The AKC Museum of the Dog is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization funded mainly by private and corporate gift donations.

For more information on the AKC Museum of the Dog visit www.Museumofthedog.org

Become a fan of the AKC Museum of the Dog on Facebook at akcmuseumofthedog

 

 

Talkin' Pets News

May 4, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Maria Ryan

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests - Country Artist Marty Brown from "America's Got Talent" will join Jon and Talkin' Pets May 4, 2019 at 630pm ET to discuss and give away his new CD, American Highway

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