Ambassadors Georgina Bloomberg, Brianne Goutal, Hayley Barnhill, Jessica Springsteen, Stacia Madden and Jennifer Gates will help raise awareness about equine welfare and pet adoption

NEW YORK—For the ninth consecutive year, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) will partner with the Hampton Classic Horse Show to raise awareness of critical animal welfare issues and find loving homes for local shelter animals, including dogs, cats, and horses. The ASPCA will be joined by ASPCA Equine Welfare Ambassadors and top international riders Georgina Bloomberg, Brianne Goutal, Hayley Barnhill, Jessica Springsteen, Stacia Madden and the newest ambassador, Jennifer Gates. The group will host two events during the week-long horse show, held in Bridgehampton from August 23-30: ASPCA Adoption & Animal Welfare Day on Monday, August 24, and the “Be Their Voice” ASPCA Equine Welfare Town Hall on Wednesday, August 26.

“We are proud to team up with the Hampton Classic Horse Show once again to raise awareness about critical equine welfare issues and help find loving homes for animals in need,” said Nancy Perry, senior vice president of ASPCA Government Relations. “The protection of horses has been a core part of the ASPCA mission since our founding nearly 150 years ago and we look forward to partnering with our Equine Welfare Ambassadors to share that passion with the equine community and spectators of the show to encourage them to serve as a voice for animals."

The ASPCA Equine Welfare Ambassadors will join award-winning animal advocate and network correspondent Jill Rappaport to host the Sixth Annual ASPCA Adoption & Animal Welfare Day on Monday, August 24. This event will focus on helping rescued horses, dogs and cats find permanent homes, and several local animal shelters and rescue groups will have animals on site throughout the day, including formerly wild mustangs who now serve as ambassadors for wild horses. Participating groups include:

  • Gimme Shelter Animal Rescue
  • Ruff House Rescue
  • Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons (ARF)
  • Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation
  • Tails of Courage
  • Last Chance Animal Rescue
  • Brookhaven Animal Shelter and Adoption Center
  • Kaeli Kramer Foundation Horse Rescue and Sanctuary
  • SquirrelWood Equine Sanctuary, Inc.
  • Lucky Orphans Horse Rescue
  • Spirits Promise Equine Rescue Program
  • Our Farm Equine Rescue
  • The Cana Project
  • Akindale Thoroughbred Rescue
  • Second Chance Thoroughbreds, Inc.

“It means so much to be a voice for animals who need our help, and I am excited to join the ASPCA at the Hampton Classic this year to raise awareness, inspire action and find homes for animals,” said Jessica Springsteen, ASPCA Equine Welfare Ambassador.

The newest ASPCA Ambassador, Jennifer Gates, said, “As an equestrian and life-long animal lover, I am honored to lend my voice to this worthy cause.”

At the ASPCA’s “Be Their Voice” Equine Welfare Town Hall on Wednesday, August 26, the Ambassadors will join ASPCA experts to discuss critical issues impacting horses today, including horse slaughter, homelessness and neglect, inspiring attendees to help make a difference.

Other highlights during the week include the ‘Jump for the ASPCA’ fundraiser, sponsored by a generous donor, which will trigger a donation to the ASPCA to help animals in need every time a rider clears the ASPCA fence on the show grounds. Visiting public figures and top riders are invited to join the ASPCA throughout the week at the “ASPCA Patio and Animal Advocacy Station” located near the VIP parking and across from the public grandstand of the Grand Prix Ring, where they can take part in ”#Voices4Horses selfies” to raise awareness and inspire action for horse welfare.

The ASPCA’s long history of equine protection includes supporting equine welfare through legislation, advocacy, rescue, and targeted grants. In 2014, the ASPCA awarded over $1.1 million in grants to support 169 equine rescues and sanctuaries across the country. The grants were primarily awarded as part of the ASPCA Equine Fund, which provides life-saving resources – including financial assistance, in-person and online training, and sharing of best practices – to support non-profit equine welfare organizations.

To learn more about the ASPCA or to join the Advocacy Brigade, please visit www.aspca.org

For more information on the Hampton Classic, please visit www.hamptonclassic.com.

About the ASPCA® Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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BEND, Ore., July 9, 2015 - Efforts to protect wild horses on public
lands intensified as Front Range Equine Rescue (FRER), a national nonprofit
working to end the abuse and neglect of horses, today appealed a federal agency
decision to round up and remove wild horses from their homeland in Eastern
Oregon. FRER contends that BLM is engaging in an illegal breeding operation, and
that removing these horses from their native rangeland will impact critical
genetic diversity and reduce herd populations to dangerously low levels, in
violation of federal law.

As early as this month, the U.S. Department of the
Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plans to round up wild horses from a
small population in Eastern Oregon's Kiger and Riddle Mountain Herd Management
Areas. After the BLM contractor's low-flying helicopters round up the herds of
approximately 237 horses, the majority will be removed to BLM holding
facilities. Approximately 80 will be released, resulting in diminished herds
with insufficient genetic diversity which threatens the horses' survival.

In
its appeal, filed with the Department of the Interior's Board of Land Appeals,
FRER says the BLM's calculated breeding efforts irreparably damage the Kiger and
Riddle Mountain herds, and violate the language and spirit of the Wild
Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which gave the BLM a mandate to
protect the health and welfare of all wild horse herds on public lands.

The
Kiger and Riddle Mountain regions are home to Kiger mustangs, a famous and
unique strain thought to be partly descended from horses brought to the West by
Spaniards. Horse aficionados value Kiger mustangs for their distinctive coloring
and characteristics. Kiger mustangs are popular at BLM auctions, sales, and
adoption events. The BLM typically returns some Kiger mustangs to the rangelands
to continue their desirable traits in the breeding population. However, the Wild
Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act does not permit greater protections for Kiger
mustangs than it does for other wild horses.

"The roundup and removal of
horses from these herd management areas is a misguided attempt to create and
control a narrow selective breeding stock of Kiger mustangs, while removing less
genetically desirable non-Kiger mustangs from the herds," said Hilary Wood,
President of FRER. "Returning only a small number of horses to the range is far
less than what the BLM's own policies state is a healthy size for a normally
reproducing herd - a move that can only harm the herds' chances of
survival."

BLM management guidelines say that a healthy herd size to ensure
genetic diversity is around 200 horses. Herd sizes for the Kiger and Riddle
Mountain Herd Management Areas have been set at 51-82 and 33-56 respectively,
far smaller than required to maintain genetic viability.

"Reducing the
population to the very bottom threshold of the BLM's recommended management
levels, and well below what it knows is necessary for genetic diversity, will be
catastrophic for this population," said Wood. "At a time when Oregon state
officials are taking action to improve genetic diversity of other wildlife,
these planned BLM roundups will vastly reduce the overall wild horse population
in these areas and be disastrous to herd health over time."

About Front Range Equine Rescue
(FRER)
Front Range Equine Rescue, based in Larkspur, Colo., is a 501c3
nonprofit working to end abuse and neglect of wild and domestic horses through
rescue and education. Since 1997, FRER has assisted thousands of horses through
its rescue and educational programs. Many of FRER's rescued horses are obtained
directly from livestock auctions and feed lots, and would have been shipped to
slaughter without FRER's intervention. Through its legal advocacy, FRER has
effectively prevented horses from being slaughtered for human food in the U.S.,
and is actively involved in preventing unnecessary and unlawful roundups or
removal of wild horses and burros from public lands. For more information see
www.frontrangeequinerescue.org.

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Seven equine rescues receive grants to recognize their efforts to protect horses

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today revealed the seven winners of the 2015 ASPCA Help a Horse Day contest, a nationwide grant competition for equine rescues and sanctuaries to raise awareness about the year-round work they do to save and care for at-risk horses. The three grand prize winners received $10,000 each, while the runners up were awarded $5,000 to support their ongoing efforts to protect horses. The winning groups include:

$10,000 Grand Prize Winners:

  • All About Equine Animal Rescue, El Dorado Hills, Calif.
  • Horses of Tir Na Nog, San Diego, Calif.
  • The Pegasus Project, Ben Wheeler, TX

$5,000 Prize Winners:

  • Freedom Hill Horse Rescue, Owings, Md.
  • Horse Haven of Tennessee Inc., Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Livestock and Equine Awareness and Rescue Network (LEARN), Meggett, S.C.
  • RVR Horse Rescue Inc., Riverview, Fla.

“In only its second year, the ASPCA Help a Horse Day celebration has grown to include even more groups, and we are thrilled to see the energy and effort that went into engaging their communities and spreading their message about how to protect horses,” said Jacque Schultz, senior director of the ASPCA Equine Fund. “The winning rescue groups embody the spirit and hope behind ASPCA Help a Horse Day and we are pleased to award them these grants to help pay for the vital services they provide every day of the year.”

More than 100 equine rescue groups held events across 33 states during the weekend of April 24-26, and the winners were selected based on the creativity of their events, as well as their success engaging their local communities. This year’s winning events included a Ponypalooza event for families with games and prizes, which also featured members of the U.S. Air Force and local Boy Scout troops engaging in a shelter construction project; a family carnival with pony rides and a “Muggin’ with the Mule” photo booth; the creation of a Help a Horse Posse and Sponsorship program that allowed community members to sponsor horses; and Dancing for the Horses, which paired local celebrities with professional dancers to compete in honor of a rescued horse. One group even hosted an aviation festival in keeping with their theme of giving rescue horses their wings.  Participating rescues also worked to recruit new volunteers, expand their support base, collect donated supplies, and find homes for adoptable horses.

ASPCA Help a Horse Day is celebrated annually on April 26 – a date chosen for its significance to the ASPCA’s long history of horse protection. In 1866, ASPCA founder Henry Bergh stopped a cart driver from beating his horse, resulting in the first successful arrest for horse mistreatment on April 26 of that year. The protection of horses has been a core part of the ASPCA mission ever since, which includes supporting equine welfare legislation, public advocacy, professional development, horse rescue, and targeted grants.

In addition to the grants contest, the ASPCA also launched a petition on TakePart.com, which has generated over 24,000 signatures, urging the U.S. Congress to pass a federal ban on horse slaughter. Each year, approximately 150,000 American horses are purchased and trucked to Mexico and Canada to be slaughtered for human consumption. The vast majority of these horses (92 percent, according to the USDA) are in good physical condition and could go on to lead productive lives in loving homes. Horse slaughter is especially inhumane because horses, skittish by nature, are extremely difficult to render unconscious before slaughter.

For more information on the ASPCA’s efforts to protect horses, please visit http://www.aspca.org/get-involved/horses.

About the ASPCA® Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Harness the Power of Beneficial Microbes to Protect Against Germs
Floor-Mate™ Offers Ranchers and Cattle Owners a Natural Formula to Keep Stables Clean
Justin, TX (May 2015) - The country has just experienced one of the more divergent winters on record, and conditions on opposing coasts were equal in contradiction. According to a climate study, most Western states survived one of the top 10 warmest winters under an extreme drought while 23 Eastern and Northern states endured one of the top 10 coldest winters with record levels of snow1. Whether raising dairy cows in California or hens in Pennsylvania, many owners of poultry and cattle were challenged with extended hours spent indoors for feed, water, and shelter. The increase of time spent enclosed raises many risks to farm sanitation, animal health and spread of germs. Under such conditions, ranchers and handlers are constantly faced with the challenge of how to remove animal waste material or sanitize the stall or living area. Some of the most commonly known diseases that come from untreated animal waste include E. Coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter and Yersinia2. Bio S.I. Technology’s (www.biositechnology.com/) Floor-Mate provides an all-natural solution to safeguard livestock health and reduce the spread of dangerous pathogens to people.
Bio S.I.’s Floor-Mate keeps bacteria from growing in manure left in bedding and protects livestock’s health from harmful toxins in waste matter and urine that can sicken animals with pneumonia. In addition, in order to combat the odors from waste material, Bio S.I.’s Floor-Mate utilizes non-manure, naturally occurring soil inoculants and microbes that break down the proteins, salts, and other materials found in urine and fecal matter, which can cause musty, unpleasant odors.
”We understand the challenges of each season, but especially during colder months, in keeping livestock healthy and ready for the more productive months. In the day of large scale ranching to meet population and consumer demands, taking the necessary precautions to ensure the safety of yourself and your livestock is crucial to production throughout the year,” says Bio S.I Technology founder and CEO Wayne Tucker. “In addition to keeping livestock production up, Bio S.I.’s Floor-Mate allows you to keep your costs and labor demands down.”
Floor-Mate can be sprayed as a diluted solution or rinse with water after, depending on the application needs, for a clean area. Bio S.I. varies in sizes of products, for any livestock. Floor-Mate is applicable to all types of livestock areas such as poultry houses, horse stalls, dairy barns, hog barns, and anywhere livestock is held. One quart of Bio S.I. Floor-Mate will cover up to 1,000 square feet, allowing you to save money on less concentrated solution or additional supplies and save time demanded from alternative cleaning methods. Using Bio S.I.’s Floor-Mate to ensure the livestock housing will remain safe and toxin free. For more information about Floor-mate or to order directly, please visit: www.biositechnology.com
About Bio S.I. Technology
Bio S.I. Technology, LLC is a USDA BioPreferred™ member comprised of a team of experts with decades of experience producing microbial products. Bio S.I produces a full range of microbial inoculants including Bio S.I. Lawn & Garden Formula, Septic Cleanser Formula, Remediation Formula and Jackpot I & II, new all-natural probiotic products formulated to bring beneficial soil borne microbes inside the digestive tracts of livestock and equine. Bio S.I. products can be found at Farm Supply, on line and through a network of distributors around the US. For more information about Bio S.I. Technology, or to purchase their effective formulas, please visit www.biositechnology.com .###

Animal welfare organizations support Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act  

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 22, 2015) — Federal lawmakers today introduced legislation to prevent the establishment of horse slaughter operations within the U.S., end the current export of American horses for slaughter abroad, and protect the public from consuming toxic horse meat. The Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act, H.R. 1942, was introduced by Reps. Frank Guinta (R-N.H.), Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.), and Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-N.M.). The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®), the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), The Humane Society of the United States and The Humane Society Legislative Fund announced their enthusiastic support for the legislation.
Last year, more than 140,000 American horses were slaughtered for human consumption in foreign countries. The animals often suffer long journeys to slaughter plants in Canada and Mexico without adequate food, water or rest. At the slaughterhouse, horses are  brutally forced into a “kill box” and shot in the head with a captive bolt gun in an attempt to stun them before slaughter—a process that can be inaccurate due to the biology and nature of equines and result in animals sustaining repeated blows or remaining conscious during the kill process.
“For centuries, horses have embodied the spirit of American freedom and pride,” said Rep. Guinta. “To that end, horses are not raised for food – permitting their transportation for the purposes of being slaughtered for human consumption is not consistent with our values and results in a dangerously toxic product.  This bipartisan bill seeks to prevent and end the inhumane and dangerous process of transporting thousands of horses a year for food.”
“Horses sent to slaughter are often subject to appalling, brutal treatment,” said Rep. Schakowsky. “We must fight those practices. The SAFE Act of 2015 will ensure that these majestic animals are treated with the respect they deserve.”
“The slaughter of horses for human consumption is an absolute travesty that must be stopped,” said Rep. Buchanan.  “This bipartisan measure will finally put an end to this barbaric practice.”
"Horse slaughter is an inhumane practice that causes great pain and distress to the animals, and poses numerous environmental and food safety concerns,” said Rep. Lujan Grisham. “The vast majority of my constituents oppose horse slaughter. I'm proud to support the SAFE Act to ban this cruelty once and for all."
The SAFE Act would also protect consumers from dangerous American horse meat, which can be toxic to humans due to the unregulated administration of drugs to horses. Because horses are not raised for food, they are routinely given hundreds of toxic drugs and chemical treatments over their lifetimes that are prohibited by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in animals intended for human consumption. Those drugs, although safe for horses, are potentially toxic to humans if consumed. In December 2014, the European Union (EU) announced its suspension of imports of horse meat from Mexico after a scathing audit of EU-certified Mexican horse slaughter plants, which kill tens of thousands of American horses each year. Additionally, the discovery of horse meat in beef products in Europe shocked consumers and raised concerns about the potential impact on American food industries.
The ASPCA, AWI, and The HSUS encourage the public to contact their U.S. representatives and urge them to cosponsor the SAFE Act, H.R. 1942, in order to protect America’s horses and overall consumer health from horse slaughter.

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About the ASPCA® Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

About AWI The Animal Welfare Institute (www.awionline.org) is a non-profit charitable organization founded in 1951 and dedicated to reducing animal suffering caused by people.  AWI engages policymakers, scientists, industry, and the public to achieve better treatment of animals everywhere—in the laboratory, on the farm, in commerce, at home, and in the wild.  Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for updates and other important animal protection news.

About The HSUS The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization, rated most effective by our peers. For 60 years, we have celebrated the protection of all animals and confronted all forms of cruelty. We are the nation’s largest provider of hands-on services for animals, caring for more than 100,000 animals each year, and we prevent cruelty to millions more through our advocacy campaigns. Read more about our 60 years of transformational change for animals and people, and visit us online at humanesociety.org.

ASPCA #HelpAHorse contest will award $50,000 in grant prizes to equine organizations across the country

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced the participants in its 2015 ASPCA Help a Horse Day grants contest. The nationwide competition of equine rescues and sanctuaries is designed to raise awareness about the year-round lifesaving work they do to care for local at-risk horses who’ve been abused, neglected or find themselves homeless. Participating rescue groups will be competing for the chance to win up to $10,000 in grant prizes to assist their efforts to protect horses. The groups will be judged on the creativity of their events, as well as their ability to engage their local communities. This year the contest has expanded to recognize seven winners.

“The equine rescues and sanctuaries that step in to care for abused or neglected horses give them a much-deserved new lease on life, and we are grateful to have the opportunity to expand the contest this year to recognize even more groups for their hard work,” said Jacque Schultz, senior director of the ASPCA Equine Fund. “We were overwhelmed by the enthusiasm and creativity of last year’s participants, and look forward to seeing what new ideas our repeat participants incorporate into their ASPCA Help a Horse Day events.  We are also excited to welcome many new groups who will be participating for the first time.”

This year, 110 groups will be hosting events across 33 states during the weekend of April 24-26. Activities include open houses, education programs, spring festivals, hoe-downs, barn raisings, 5K walks and other fun-filled events.  ASPCA Help a Horse Day is celebrated annually on April 26 – a date chosen for its significance to the ASPCA’s long history of horse protection. In 1866, ASPCA founder Henry Bergh stopped a cart driver from beating his horse, resulting in the first successful arrest for horse mistreatment on April 26 of that year. The protection of horses has been a core part of the ASPCA mission ever since, which includes supporting equine welfare legislation, advocacy, rescue and targeted grants.

The ASPCA has also launched a petition on TakePart.com, urging the U.S. Congress to pass a federal ban on horse slaughter. Each year, approximately 150,000 American horses are purchased and trucked to Mexico and Canada to be slaughtered for human consumption. The vast majority of these horses (92 percent per USDA) are in good physical condition and could go on to lead productive lives in loving homes. Horse slaughter is especially inhumane because horses, skittish by nature, are extremely difficult to render unconscious before slaughter. Horse slaughter is a cruel, predatory industry, and as long as sending American horses to slaughter for human consumption abroad remains a legal option, thousands of equines will be vulnerable at local horse auctions where kill buyers are present.

Last year, the ASPCA awarded over $1.1 million in grants to support 169 equine rescues and sanctuaries across the country. The grants were primarily awarded as part of the ASPCA Equine Fund, which provides life-saving resources – including financial assistance, in-person and online training, and sharing of best practices -- to support non-profit equine welfare organizations.

For more information about ASPCA Help a Horse Day or to see if there is an event near you, please visit www.aspca.org/helpahorse.

About the ASPCA® Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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New ‘Help a Horse Day’ contest and other initiatives fueled awareness and advocacy of equine protection

NEW YORK— The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) today announced that in 2014 its Equine Fund awarded over $1.1 million in grants to support 169 equine rescues and sanctuaries across the country. The grant money supported several areas of equine welfare including emergency food grants, training scholarships, a new nationwide contest held on ASPCA Help a Horse Day, and the Rescuing Racers Initiative, which aids in the rescue and rehabilitation of retired racehorses to save them from slaughter.

“Racehorses are just as susceptible as other horses to being sent to livestock auctions and then on to the slaughterhouse, when their racing days are over,” said Jacque Schultz, senior director of the ASPCA Equine Fund. “The ASPCA is grateful to our special supporters who enable us to keep these horses safe by providing assistance to equine rescues who transition ex-racers out of the racing stable and into new homes in someone’s show barn or farm paddock.”

In 2014, more than 80 equine rescue groups held events across 32 states to raise awareness about equine protection for ASPCA Help a Horse Day, celebrated annually on April 26 – a date chosen for its significance to the ASPCA’s long history of horse protection. In 1866, ASPCA founder Henry Bergh stopped a cart driver from beating his horse, resulting in the first successful arrest for horse mistreatment on April 26 of that year. The protection of horses has remained a core part of the ASPCA’s mission ever since, including legislation, advocacy, rescue and targeted grants.

“We were overwhelmed by the enthusiasm and creativity of the equine rescue groups that participated in the first ASPCA Help a Horse Day celebration contest,” said Schultz. “We continue to be inspired by their year-round commitment to equine welfare and we can’t wait to see what new ideas they come up with in 2015 to further protect horses.”

California, the state with the largest number of equine rescues and sanctuaries, as well as some of the nation’s highest hay costs, led the ASPCA Equine Fund grant recipients with 35 grants. New York followed in second place with 11 grants, while Oregon, Florida and Kentucky were all tied with 10 grants each.

The ASPCA Equine Fund provides grants to non-profit, U.S. equine welfare organizations who work to rescue and protect horses. The grants benefit equine organizations striving to achieve best practices both in nonprofit management and equine care.
To learn more about the ASPCA Equine Fund and 2014 grantees, visit www.aspcapro.org.

About the ASPCA® Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

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When the Horses Whisper
The Wisdom of Wise and Sentient Beings

by
Rosalyn W. Berne

Rosalyn Berne has always known that she was different from most people. Even as a child she was aware of things that others could not see or hear, experiencing the life force around her. But her special ability with horses was something that she would not fully recognize until she was an adult. Returning to Costa Rica―a once–visited sanctuary—she sought solace from the world and hoped to begin healing from a painful divorce and the subsequent breakdown of her family. Drawn to the horses that are part of the working farm-resort that was her retreat, she suddenly and unexpectedly received a gift―the ability to communicate with them. And what they said changed her life.

 

When the Horses Whisper shows the true power of horses. Once they realized that Rosalyn was able to ‘hear’ them they opened up completely, showing her a world of strength, beauty and, most importantly, love. She begins to realize how strong the bond is between horse and human and how anyone can communicate with them on a deeper level. She also learns how they can help humans to heal from loss and pain as she begins to recover from her own grief, including the loss of a child, a traumatic childhood encounter, and the end of her marriage.

 

As the story of each horse is revealed the author understands that they are telling her more than their own stories, they are teaching and helping her to rediscover her whole self, reminding her that she is part of a much larger universe. Proud and resourceful, the horses remind us all that creation is around us and within us at all times. In helping us to recover the pieces of ourselves that have been lost along our way, the horse’s teaching allows us to reconnect with our soul selves.

 

As the author continues to return to Costa Rica she is always met by old friends and introduced to new ones. Their stories are accompanied by photographs taken by the author’s daughter that illustrate the grace and spirit of each, beautifully recognizing the unique character of each horse. Filled with insight and hope When the Horses Whisper is an engrossing look into the heart of a horse and how the horse-human bond can change us all.

Rainbow Ridge Books • 2013 • ISBN 978-1-937907-16-7 • Trade Paper • $17.95

 

Bio

Rosalyn W. Berne, Ph.D
.

 

 

Rosalyn W. Berne, Ph.D. explores the intersecting realms between emerging technologies, science, fiction and myth, and between the human and non-human worlds. As a university professor she writes and teaches about engineering and technology in society and the ethical implications of technological development, often using science fiction material in her classes. In her personal life she continues to discover the transformational nature of human-equine relationships, and offers facilitation and translation services for enhancing communication between horses and their owners. She is author of Nanotalk: Conversations with Scientists and Engineers About Ethics, Meaning, and Belief in the Development of Nanotechnology (Erlbaum Press, 2005) and the novel, Waiting in the Silence (Spore Press, 2012). To Recreate Life from Life, Biotechnology and Science Fiction brings the non-fictional writing of research scientists together with Berne’s science fiction short stories (forthcoming from Pan Stanford Press).

Full schedule of events includes ASPCA Adoption Day, appearances by ASPCA Equine Welfare Ambassadors, celebrities & top riders

NEW YORK—For the seventh consecutive year, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is partnering with the Hampton Classic Horse Show, held in Bridgehampton, N.Y., from Sunday, August 25 to Sunday, September 1, 2013.

On Monday, August 26, the ASPCA will host the Fourth Annual ASPCA Adoption and Animal Welfare Day at the Classic, focusing on helping rescued, horses, dogs, cats, and pigs find permanent homes. Seven local animal shelters and rescue groups will have animals on site throughout the day, including two former wild mustangs who serve as ambassadors for wild horses. Celebrity hosts include NBC’s Award Winning Animal Advocate and Bestselling Author, Jill Rappaport, as well as ASPCA Equine Welfare Ambassadors and top international riders Georgina Bloomberg and Brianne Goutal.

“We are excited to showcase the ASPCA’s history of horse protection and spread the word about how to help at-risk animals at the Hampton Classic,” said Valerie Angeli, senior director of equine and special projects for the ASPCA. “Our ASPCA Maclay Medal celebrates the tradition of excellence in humane and responsible horsemanship and our work at the Hampton Classic provides a wonderful opportunity to educate the community as well as find permanent homes for animals in need."

Other highlights during the week-long event include the ASPCA “Voices for Horses” Equine Welfare Reception and expert panel discussion, which takes place on Thursday, August 29. ASPCA supporters and Equine Welfare Ambassadors, Georgina Bloomberg and Jill Rappaport, actress Aida Turturro, and Prince Lorenzo Borghese will join ASPCA experts and others to discuss many critical issues impacting horses today, including horse slaughter, homelessness and neglect, and inspire attendees to help make a difference.

Visiting celebrities and top riders, including ASPCA Equine Welfare Ambassadors Georgina Bloomberg and Brianne Goutal will join us throughout the week at the “ASPCA Patio and Animal Advocacy Station” located near the VIP parking and across from the public grandstand of the Grand Prix Ring (please see schedule below).

“I am proud to serve as an ASPCA Equine Welfare Ambassador, and I am thrilled to take part in the ASPCA’s activities at the Hampton Classic again this year,” said Ms. Bloomberg. “The ASPCA was the first humane organization in the country to promote equine welfare and protection, a mission it continues to this day through advocacy, grant funding to horse rescue groups, and field investigations. This world-class horse show provides a great opportunity for the equine community and spectators of the show to join the ASPCA and serve as a voice for these noble animals.”

The presentation of the ASPCA Maclay Award at the Classic will take place on Friday, August 30. The ASPCA Maclay Championship was established in 1933 by former ASPCA board member Alfred B. Maclay to encourage junior riders to excel in the art of responsible and humane horsemanship. It is a highly coveted award in the U.S. for junior riders under 18 years of age.

From August 1 through September 30th the ASPCA, the Hampton Classic Horse Show and Neptune Feed will also be collecting donations for the ASPCA “Hay It Forward” Project, which is designed to raise awareness of equine welfare issues while providing much needed feed and supplies to local equine rescue organizations. This is a supplemental program to the ASPCA’s existing Hay Bale Out grants program, which helps feed hungry horses across the United States. To make a donation to the ASPCA “Hay It Forward” Project, please visit the ASPCA Patio or Hampton Classic Feed Store office during the show, or contact Neptune Feed at (631) 369-0965.

For more information on the Hampton Classic, please visit http://www.aspca.org/horse or www.hamptonclassic.com.

Schedule of ASPCA Events/Expert Appearances at the 38th Annual Hampton Classic Horse Show

Sunday, August 25: Book Signing – at the ASPCA Patio

  • 11 a.m.-2 p.m. – Book signing with Jayne M. Silberman, author of In the Herd: A Photographic Journey with the Chincoteague Ponies and Assateague Horses, with proceeds from the sale of the book benefiting the ASPCA Equine Fund.

Monday, August 26: Fourth Annual ASPCA Adoption and Animal Welfare Day

  • 11 a.m.–3 p.m. – The Fourth Annual ASPCA Adoption Day at the Hampton Classic will feature local dog, cat, pig, and horse rescue groups with animals available for adoption. The event will feature VIP hosts Jill Rappaport, NBC’s award-winning animal advocate and bestselling author, along with ASPCA Equine Welfare Ambassadors Georgina Bloomberg and Brianne Goutal.
    • Participating dog and cat rescue groups include: The Little Shelter Animal Rescue and Adoption Center; Southampton Animal Shelter; Gimme Shelter; ARF Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons; and Pigs4Me. Adoptable dogs, cats, and pigs will be available in the Kids/Exhibition area across from the ASPCA Patio and Animal Advocacy Station.
    • Participating horse rescue groups include Kaeli Kramer Foundation and Project Sage Horse Rescue. There will be a live, interactive program with adoptable horses and horse rescue groups in the Aspinall Ring from 12 p.m.–2 p.m.; guests can meet Jill Rappaport, Georgina Bloomberg and international VIP rider Brianne Goutal and take a tour of the state of the art Heart Horse Ambulance – a modern day version of the ambulance invented for injured horses by the ASPCA in 1867.

Tuesday, August 27 and Wednesday, August 28:

  • Please visit the ASPCA Patio and Animal Advocacy Station for schedule information.

Thursday, August 29: ASPCA “Voices for Horses” Equine Welfare Reception and Expert Panel Discussion– “THE Event for Those Who Care”

  • 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. (ASPCA Ringside Chalet, north of the Grand Prix Arena) Sponsored by Louis Roederer Champagne – The ASPCA will host the ‘Voices for Horses’ Equine Welfare Reception and expert  panel discussion, with celebrity attendees including actress Aida Turturro, Jill Rappaport, Prince Lorenzo Borghese, and ASPCA Equine Welfare Ambassadors Georgina Bloomberg and Brianne Goutal. This event is by invitation only and space is limited. For information on how to obtain an invitation, please contact the ASPCA’s Valerie Angeli via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Friday, August 30: ASPCA Maclay Award Presentation

  • Late morning (Time/Ring TBD) – Local competition - ASPCA Maclay Award Presentation.

Saturday, August 31: Kid’s Day at the Hampton Classic

  • Please visit the ASPCA Patio and Animal Advocacy Station for schedule information.

Sunday, September 1: Grand Prix Sunday

  • Please visit the ASPCA Patio and Animal Advocacy Station for schedule information.

Throughout the Week:

  • ‘ASPCA VIP Rider’ lapel pins and ‘Horses on Sticks’ will be available at the ASPCA Patio and Animal Advocacy Station for a donation, with proceeds benefitting the ASPCA’s horse protection efforts.
  • The ‘Jump for the ASPCA’ fundraiser, sponsored by FTI Consulting, will trigger a donation to the ASPCA each time a rider clears the ASPCA fence on the show grounds.
  • Help save animal’s lives and Sign up for the ASPCA Advocacy Brigade at the ASPCA Patio and follow us on Twitter @ASPCA to be entered in a drawing to win a prize.
  • The ASPCA, the Hampton Classic Horse Show, and Neptune Feed of Long Island, NY will collaborate to assist local equine rescue groups through the ASPCA Hay It Forward Project. To make a donation to the ASPCA Hay It Forward Project, please visit the Hampton Classic Feed Store office or the ASPCA Patio during the show, or contact Neptune Feed at (631) 369-0965.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

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NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®), Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), and Animal Protection of New Mexico are dismayed over the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s recent decision to approve an application for a horse slaughter facility at Valley Meat Company LLC in Roswell, N.M. on the grounds that killing horses for human consumption is inhumane and creates a serious health risk to consumers. Similar applications are pending for Rains Natural Meats in Gallatin, Mo., and Responsible Transportation LLC in Sigourney, Iowa, and could be approved as early as Monday.

Valley Meat is slated to be the first facility in the U.S. to be green-lighted to slaughter horses for human consumption since 2007, when the few remaining plants closed after Congress voted to eliminate funding for horse meat inspections. This surprising move to reopen a horse slaughter plant defies common sense, given Congress’s recent votes to eliminate funding for such inspections and the scandal in the European Union, where horse meat was found to be mislabeled as beef in prepared food products. On June 13, the House Appropriations Committee voted to include language prohibiting the use of tax dollars for horse slaughter inspections in its Agriculture Appropriations bill, and on June 20, the Senate Appropriations Committee voted in favor of including the same language in its version of the Appropriations bill. These bills are both expected to move for floor action in July, signaling revocation of the USDA’s inspection abilities in a matter of months.

“The writing is on the wall – Americans don’t want our horses slaughtered, here or in any other country. Moving ahead with a government program to fund horse slaughter inspections is a cruel, reckless and fiscally irresponsible move,” said Nancy Perry, senior vice president of ASPCA Government Relations.  “Recent polling shows that 70 percent of New Mexicans, along with the overwhelming majority of Americans, are opposed to the slaughter of U.S. horses for human consumption. Given the recent firestorm of concern and outrage over horse meat entering the food supply in Europe, this decision is shocking. The USDA is knowingly diverting tax dollars from programs that protect American consumers to programs that jeopardize them. It is time for Congress to take action to prevent American horses from suffering this terrible fate and stop horse slaughter in the U.S. once and for all.”

Horse slaughter is inherently cruel and often erroneously compared to humane euthanasia. The methods used to slaughter horses rarely result in quick, painless deaths, as horses are difficult to stun and often remain conscious during their butchering and dismemberment. Whether slaughter occurs in the U.S. or abroad, these equines suffer incredible abuse even before they arrive at the slaughterhouse, often transported for more than 24 hours at a time without food, water or rest, and in dangerously overcrowded trailers where the animals are often seriously injured or even killed in transit. The majority of horses killed for human consumption are young, healthy animals who could go on to lead productive lives with loving owners. Last year, more than 160,000 American horses were sent to a cruel death by a grisly foreign industry that produces unsafe food for consumers.

“I am baffled and greatly disappointed that the USDA has chosen to approve this application despite strong opposition from the state of New Mexico, the U.S. Congress and the American public,” said Chris Heyde, deputy director of government and legal affairs for AWI.  “Given an earlier statement from USDA Secretary Vilsack opposing horse slaughter and calling for alternatives and recent votes in Congress against this practice we had hoped no plant would be allowed to open.  It just means we will have to redouble our efforts to pass the SAFE Act which will ban slaughter and ensure our horses are safe from this cruel and predatory industry.”

“New Mexicans reject the idea of a horse slaughter plant in our state,” said Lisa Jennings, executive director of Animal Protection of New Mexico. “Horses are a valuable part of our heritage, and we have worked hard to develop a robust safety net for them, not condemn them to slaughter.”

“Despite the federal government’s decision to legalize horse slaughter for human consumption, I believe creating a horse slaughtering industry in New Mexico is wrong and I am strongly opposed,” said New Mexico Governor, Susana Martinez. “Like the overwhelming majority of Americans across the country, New Mexicans oppose the slaughter of horses for human consumption. Not only is there not a domestic demand for horsemeat, the act of slaughter itself is considered inhumane by experts, given that a horse’s biology makes them difficult to stun, leaving them conscious during the slaughter process.”

“Granting an inspection of the proposed horse slaughtering facility does not resolve the issues of potential violation of New Mexico State requirements,” said New Mexico’s Attorney General, Gary K. King. “Our office has expressed concern that under current practices it is unlikely that the plant can show that it meets the requirements of the New Mexico Food Act in their manufacture and delivery of horse meat for human consumption. The plant will also likely be required to meet State environmental standards for their discharges.”

“As a veterinarian, natural resource manager, and someone who has had the great good fortune to grow up with and around horses, I am very concerned about their health and safety. If a horse is hurt, terminally ill, or has no chance to find a loving home, then humane euthanasia is an important option,” said New Mexico State Land Commissioner, Ray Powell, D.V.M. “I am told the USDA is considering the proposal to open a horse slaughtering facility in our state. Since we do not have enough unwanted horses in New Mexico to make this economically viable, it means that horses would be trucked in from across the nation. We do not have the safeguards and oversight in place to ensure their humane handling, transport, and euthanasia. New Mexico can do much better by these intelligent and gentle creatures, and I strongly oppose this ill-conceived proposal.”

The decision to allow facilities to slaughter horses adds further to the burden on U.S. taxpayers at a time when spending cuts associated with the sequester could curtail food safety inspections for U.S. meat products. Additionally, with the opening of a horse slaughter plant in the U.S., it will be more difficult to prevent the kind of comingling between horse meat and beef products that has occurred in Europe.

In March, U.S. Sens. Mary Landrieu, D-La., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Reps. Patrick Meehan, R-Pa., and Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., introduced the Safeguard American Foods Export (SAFE) Act (S. 541/ H.R. 1094), bipartisan legislation that will prevent the introduction of horse slaughter operations in the U.S., end the current export of American horses for slaughter abroad, and protect the public from consuming toxic horse meat. AWI, APNM and the ASPCA urge Congress to swiftly pass the SAFE Act to protect horses and consumers.

 

 

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

About the Animal Welfare Institute
The Animal Welfare Institute (www.awionline.org) is a non-profit charitable organization founded in 1951 and dedicated to reducing animal suffering caused by people.  AWI engages policymakers, scientists, industry, and the public to achieve better treatment of animals everywhere—in the laboratory, on the farm, in commerce, at home, and in the wild.  Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for updates and other important animal protection news.

About Animal Protection of New Mexico
Animal Protection of New Mexico has been challenging historic and widespread animal cruelty in New Mexico since 1979.

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