Spirit of Elsa lives on in Meru National Park
 

Large carnivore census reveals lions holiding their own in Elsa's homeland

The results of a vitally important large carnivore census in Meru National Park, Kenya, along with an exciting short video , were released today by international wildlife charity Born Free Foundation, revealing that the lion population there is holding its own.

The census, conducted earlier this year as part of a long-term lion monitoring project undertaken by Kenya Wildlife Service in collaboration with Born Free, and sponsored by the charity’s global partner, Land Rover, estimated as many as 79 lions* may be living in and around the park.

Meru is the historic homeland of the world-famous lioness, Elsa, who was raised and returned to the wild by legendary conservationists Joy and George Adamson, and whose story was told in the best-selling book and Oscar-winning film Born Free. The findings of the census are therefore of significant historical importance.

Will Travers OBE, President and CEO of Born Free Foundation, who was part of the team in Meru, said: “My mother, Virginia McKenna, and I were recently in Meru, one of the most striking and under-appreciated parks in Kenya. To see the dedication of Kenya Wildlife Service, our Born Free team, our colleagues from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, and the members of the local community, was inspiring. Africa’s lions are in trouble but we are all working hard to make sure that in Meru their future can be secured.”

Scientists believe that the estimate is encouraging as Meru, which is located below the North Eastern foothills of Mount Kenya, is considered an important and viable lion stronghold which, if well-managed and conserved, could see wild lions thrive for decades to come. Although Meru is considered a key and secure habitat for lions, the status of its population was previously not well-known. The park is currently being restored after much of its wildlife was almost wiped out in the 1970s and 1980s by heavy poaching.

Lions across West, Central, and East Africa have declined by 60% or more over the past 21 years. More than a dozen African countries are already thought to have lost their lion populations entirely, and the international demand for lion bones and body parts, combined with unsustainable lion trophy hunting operations and growing evidence of lion poaching, are further exacerbating this downward spiral. There are currently thought to be as few as 20,000 lions remaining across Africa.

Tim Oloo, Country Manager for Born Free Kenya, added: “The data we have obtained from the census will allow Born Free Foundation, working with KWS, to build informed programmes to help conserve and protect lions. We’re going to save the Meru lions!”

As Born Free’s Year of the Lion 2016 draws to a close, Born Free has today launched an exciting short video following the team as they conduct the important census.

Born Free’s Year of the Lion 2016 saw the Foundation celebrate the 50th anniversary of the premiere of the Born Free film through a year-long series of events and activities. Events included the release of the Channel 4 documentary Virginia McKenna’s Born Free, in October; a Born Free delegation attending the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), in Johannesburg, to stand up for lions and all wildlife, in September; and the release of ground-breaking research that confirmed the existence of a previously forgotten population of lions in Ethiopia, in February.

Born Free will host a Tweetstorm on 9th December (1pm-2pm UK time) to draw to a close Born Free’s Year of the Lion 2016, using the hashtag #TheFinalRoar. Born Free will be tweeting questions and lion facts, supported by Celebrity Patrons and Corporate Partners. For more information visit www.bornfree.org.uk or www.twitter.com/BFFoundation.

Find out more about the large carnivore census here

Link to video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?=-qaAT3OEmi8&feature=youtu.be

*Census results: 58 ± 21 lions; 98 ± 21 spotted hyenas; 18 ± 9 leopards; 12 ± 6 black-backed jackals; 9 ± 5 striped hyenas; 4 ± 2 caracals; 2 ± 2 aardwolfs.


About Born Free

The Born Free Foundation is a dynamic international wildlife charity, devoted to compassionate conservation and animal welfare. Born Free takes action worldwide to protect threatened species and stop individual animal suffering. Born Free believes wildlife belongs in the wild and works to phase-out zoos. We rescue animals from lives of misery in tiny cages and give them lifetime care.

Born Free protects lions, elephants, tigers, gorillas, wolves, polar bears, dolphins, marine turtles and many more species in their natural habitat, working with local communities to help people and wildlife live together without conflict. Our high-profile campaigns change public attitudes, persuade decision-makers and get results. Every year, Born Free helps hundreds of   thousands of animals worldwide. For more information about Born Free please visit: www.bornfree.org.uk



 
 

 

Meet Our Company

Workman Publishing Co., Inc., is an independently owned family of publishers, including Workman Publishing, Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, Algonquin Young Readers, Artisan, Storey Publishing, and Timber Press. We are also partners with The Experiment.

We are publishers of award-winning cookbooks, parenting/pregnancy guides, books on gardening, country living, and humor, as well as children’s books, gift books, fiction, and the bestselling calendar line in the business. Located in the heart of New York’s Greenwich Village, in a converted printers’ building, our offices are high-energy and creative, filled with people who are passionate about what they do. We also have offices in Chapel Hill, North Carolina; North Adams, Massachusetts; and Portland, Oregon.


Workman Wellness

As the publisher of many bestselling books on health and wellness, from Younger Next Year and New Health Rules to Real Happiness, The Little Book of Zen, and Keep Your Brain Alive, we practice what we publish with weekly meetings of the Yoga Group, Meditation Group, Running Club, the Knit and Crochet Lunch Club, as well as an annual company-wide seasonal Healthy Potluck lunch.


Volunteering and Charitable Gifts  

We are a caring and generous group of people who love to do volunteer work together. Four days a year we gather as a company and give our time to organizations like Goddard Riverside, Grow NYC, City Harvest, and God’s Love We Deliver. We’re also ardent fund-raisers and Workman matches 50% of all personal giving.


Community Events

Whether it’s dressing up for Halloween or ice-skating in Central Park or a summer Field Day or Beer & Game Night late on a Friday afternoon, we look for any excuse to get together and have fun.


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Workman provides its employees with generous health coverage, a 401K matching program, paid family leave, an FSA plan, and tuition and gym reimbursement.  

There are also warm bagels and fresh fruit every Monday morning, five additional vacation days during the summer, in-house activities and events, an anniversary recognition program (starting with a batch of movie tickets and, after 25 years, a trip to anywhere in the world), and much more.

Get in touch

Please feel free to reach out to us with any question, comments or feedback.  You can contact Jill Salayi, General Manager of Workman at:

 
 

 

Washington, D.C., November 21, 2016 -- Born Free USA, a global leader in wildlife conservation and animal welfare, decries the deplorable conditions in which 15 exotic animals were found last week living inside a Pahrump, Nevada home. Law enforcement reportedly discovered three lions, one Bengal tiger, eight Canadian Siberian lynx hybrid cats, one panther, one serval caracal hybrid cat, and one fennec fox locked in rooms and cages amid their own waste.

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, “The circumstances these wild animals were kept in as ‘pets’ is heart wrenching, but this type of tragedy occurs with alarming frequency, sometimes resulting in human injury or death, not to mention the horrific cruelty to the animals. A lion belongs on the plains of Africa, not in a filthy cage. A panther belongs in a rainforest, not locked away in a bedroom. A fennec fox deserves to be in a den with his mate, not trapped near predators that he cannot escape from. It is utterly selfish and despicable to even think that keeping a wild animal caged inside a home is a good idea.”

The Born Free USA Exotic Animal Incidents Database provides a startling reminder of how frequently exotic pet incidents occur. Since 2000, there have been more than 1,500 escapes, injuries, deaths, and other health and legal issues involving wild animals kept in a home. At least 36 people have died from attacks, including children, neighbors, and first responders.

Kate Dylewsky, Program Associate at Born Free USA and captive exotic animal expert, explains, “It is a miracle that none of the animals in this Nevada home escaped and no one was mauled before law enforcement stepped in. Police officers are not trained to deal with 400-pound wild cats, nor should they have to be. However, the burden of protecting both the community and the welfare of exotic pets falls on the shoulders of brave officers who put their lives on the line. It is time to take the safety of our first responders and our communities more seriously, and outlaw exotic pet ownership.”

Nevada does not have a law prohibiting the ownership of many exotic animals, including big cats, wolves, and primates. There is also no federal law to restrict or oversee private ownership of these species, resulting in a largely unregulated breeding industry and pet trade. If not for the animal cruelty statute that enabled law enforcement officers to inspect the property, it would have been entirely legal for the owners of these 15 dangerous animals to continue keeping them imprisoned.

Roberts continued, “The exploitation of animals and the threats to human safety that result from exotic pet ownership are preventable. Wild animals are not pets. They have their own needs and rights: freedoms that the animals kept in this Nevada home have been cruelly denied. Now that they have been rescued, they should go to sanctuaries where they can live as natural a life as possible, and we should outlaw exotic pet ownership entirely so that we are not faced with this situation ever again.”

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic "pets," trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to America the message of "compassionate conservation": the vision of the U.K.-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free's mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

 

Implementing New FCC & FAA Guidelines Reduces Collisions, Saves Money and Energy

(Washington, D.C., Nov. 1, 2016) New guidelines for communication tower lights spell out how tower operators can save birds and energy without sacrificing safety. Put in place by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the guidelines strongly encourage tower operators to turn off or reprogram steady-burning red or white lights in favor of flashing lights, which are less harmful to birds yet still alert pilots to the towers’ presence.

As of late October, operators of more than 750 tall towers nationwide had already updated their lighting systems under the new guidelines. Making the switch saves energy, reduces operating costs, and reduces bird collisions substantially.

Steady red or white lights on communication towers attract or disorient migratory birds flying at night. As many as seven million birds a year die in collisions with towers and the guy wires that support them.

“By extinguishing the non-flashing lights on towers, we can reduce night-time bird fatality rates by as much as 70 percent,” said Dr. Christine Sheppard, American Bird Conservancy’s Bird Collisions Campaign Manager.

“We wish to thank the operators of the 700-plus towers that have already switched their lighting to help reduce mortality of birds,” Sheppard said. “But there are still some 15,000 tall towers across the U.S. with outdated lights that are dangerous for birds. We are asking all tower operators to make this cost-saving and life-saving switch to help migratory birds.”

The new guidelines explain how owners of towers taller than 350 ft. above ground level (AGL) and built before 2015 can use a series of easy steps to end the use of non-flashing lights. The FCC and FAA are expected to release specifications for flashing lights on towers 150 to 350 ft. AGL soon.

The FAA is calling on owners to eliminate the use of non-flashing lights on all towers. “New tower lighting schemes should now follow the revised guidance, and operators of towers with the old lighting system should submit plans explaining how and when they will transition to the new standards,” the agency said in a news release.

Visit ABC’s website for more information about communication towers and birds.

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American Bird Conservancy is the Western Hemisphere's bird conservation specialist—the only organization with a single and steadfast commitment to achieving conservation results for native birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With a focus on efficiency and working in partnership, we take on the toughest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on sound science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation.

 

 
MIAMI, FLA. -OCTOBER 12, 2016 - The Zoological Wildlife Foundation (ZWF Miami) announces the arrival of its two newest tiger cubs, Harvey and Hailey, an adorable brother and sister pair.
 
"Harvey and Hailey are already playing and growing here at ZWF," said Mario Tabraue, President and Director of ZWF Miami. "The health and care of the animals at our zoo is our main concern, so we're happy the cubs are thriving" added Maria Tabraue, Vice President and director of the multi-acre private zoo located just south of Miami, FL.
 
The largest cat species, tigers reside in parts of Asia, Turkey and Russia. With approximately 3,500 of these big cats left in the wild, they are considered an endangered species. 
 
Harvey and Hailey were born at ZWF on September 6, 2016 from Metridies, one of our most beautiful big cats. The young cubs' diet consists of mainly milk, but they will slowly be introduced to meat in the weeks to come.
 
The cubs are currently available for encounters with visitors of ZWF. Guests will have a chance to meet them for a limited time for $80 + tax for adults and $40 + tax for children. To ensure the wellbeing of the cubs, the duration of each encounter is limited to 5 minutes.
 
To learn more about how you can schedule a visit to meet Harvey and Hailey as well as ZWF Miami's other resident animals, visit: www.zwfmiami.com.
 
ZWF Miami is located at 16225 SW 172 Avenue in Miami, Florida and is open to the public seven days a week. Tours of the park are available by appointment only. Call (305) 969-3696 for more information.
 
Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, for more exciting news and updates.
 
About the Zoological Wildlife Foundation:
Founded in 2001, the Zoological Wildlife Foundation (ZWF Miami) is an organization accredited by the Zoological Association of America that serves as a zoo and a conservation facility that is dedicated to educating the public about rare and endangered animal species in captivity and in the wild. Located south of Miami and spanning several breathtaking acres of land, ZWF Miami is home to everything from domestic animals, leopards, big cats primates, large predatory birds and mammals to dozens of exotic species, most of which are available for interactive encounters with the public.

 

Responding to requests to add them to the federal threatened and endangered species list, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded that the Louisville cave beetle, Tatum Cave beetle, black mudalia, sicklefin redhorse, Arkansas darter, and highlands tiger beetle do not need such protection.  A plant species, Hirst Brothers’ panic grass listing is not warranted as it has been determined that it is not a taxonomically distinct species and does not meet the definition of a species under the Endangered Species Act.

“After investigating these seven species in the field and reviewing the best available science, we determined these species do not need the protection of  the Endangered Species Act,” said Cindy Dohner, the Service’s Southeast Regional Director.  “Some species are more abundant than previously thought or do not face a level of threat that would warrant listing. One species needs more scientific study, and another, unfortunately is believed to be extinct. ”

All seven of these species were candidates for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  After a thorough review of past and current information, including extensive surveys, they have been removed from the candidate list.  

  • Louisville cave beetle – Historically, this beetle was known to exist in only two caves in Jefferson County, Kentucky: Eleven Jones and Highbaugh Caves.  Over the last two years, field surveys have shown the beetle to live in three additional caves: Sauerkraut, Cave Hill, and Cave Creek Caves.  Although stressors like human visitation and sedimentation still remain, we have no evidence that these stressors are negatively affecting the populations.   

  • Tatum Cave beetle – This beetle is known to live in a single cave, Tatum Cave, in eastern Marion County, Kentucky.  The species has not been seen since 1965 (a period of 51 years) despite multiple intensive surveys of the cave.  Based on this and the best available scientific information, we believe the Tatum Cave beetle to be extinct.  

  • Black mudalia – Little is known about this aquatic snail thought to be in the Black Warrior Basin River drainage in Jefferson and Blount counties, Alabama.  From the 1800’s until present time, researchers have recorded conflicting biological information regarding this species.  In 2016, we learned that two different samples previously identified as the Black mudalia were actually not the same.  Before the black mudalia can receive protection, scientists must accurately identify the snail and determine its status and distribution.

  • Highlands tiger beetle – This beetle occupies open sandy areas of scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge in Polk and Highlands counties, Florida.  Habitat loss and fragmentation along the Lake Wale Ridge has been substantial in the last 50 years. Yet, existing protected and suitable habitat under conservation management exists for the species.  Recent surveys also indicate that both the distribution and abundance of Highlands tiger beetles throughout its range are greater than originally known.  With the amount of available existing suitable habitat, ongoing management actions, documentation of 16 newly identified occupied sites, identification of improved habitat quality, and  existing estimated adult beetle count of more than 10,000 individuals in 56 sites, we find this beetle does not need endangered species protection. 

  • Sicklefin redhorse – Though long recognized by the Cherokee, this fish was discovered by science in the early 1990s.  It is found in Swain, Jackson, Macon, Clay, and Cherokee counties, North Carolina, and Towns County, Georgia.  For several years, it has been the subject of a focused conservation effort by the Service, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and Conservation Fisheries, Inc.  An agreement signed earlier this year formalized the partnership and brought in the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Duke Energy, and the Tennessee Valley Authority.  We find this fish does not need ESA protection based on the stability of existing populations, re-evaluation of threat likely to affect populations in the future, and development of a Candidate Conservation Agreement which ensures continued participation by all stakeholders in a focused effort to address and mitigate potential threats while expanding the range and population health of the species.

  • Arkansas darter - For nearly 30 years, the Arkansas darter (fish) has been classified as a candidate species, which means there is enough biological information and sufficient threats to protect the fish under the ESA, but other priorities have prevented such a listing. Yet, recent surveys done in areas not studied in years have expanded our knowledge and recorded 80 Arkansas darter populations in three unique areas, including high plains, mixed grass prairie, and Ozark Plateau, spread across its multi-state range from eastern Colorado, southwest and central Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, and into Arkansas. This additional information proves the Arkansas darter is resilient to threats, and with such high population numbers, makes federal protection not warranted.

  • Hirst Brothers’ panic grass - Hirst Brothers’ panic grass has been in some form of consideration for ESA listing since 1975.  Over time, we collectively have learned a lot about the plant, and new information helps put other older information into context and sometimes leads us to a different understanding from that of the past. We recognize and appreciate the long standing efforts of the Delaware, Georgia, New Jersey, Camp Lejeune North Carolina staff and other botanists to protect and restore the Hirst Brothers’ panic grass and its habitat.  Based on our review of the best available scientific and commercial information, Dichanthelium hirstii is not a taxonomically distinct species and does not meet the definition of a species under the ESA.  The Service’s decision should not be interpreted as indicating that the Hirst Brothers’ panic grass is not worth conserving.  Rather this is a decision that reflects the accurate implementation of the ESA’s standards.  We greatly appreciate all of the hard work that our partners have undertaken to conserve the plant’s diversity.  

The ESA allows anyone to petition the Service in an effort to add wildlife to the endangered species list. The recent findings on these seven species come as the Service works through hundreds of requests that have come from outside groups in recent years.  For more information on the petition process, visit http://www.fws.gov/endangered/what-we-do/listing-petition-process.html.

With such a heavy workload, the Service is taking a two-pronged approach of evaluating the petitions as required by law and emphasizing conserving plants and animals before they need the protection of the Endangered Species Act.  This has led to a broader, partner-driven effort in the Southeast to use flexibilities within the ESA to put the right conservation in the right places, benefit imperiled species, and reduce regulatory burden.

The Service’s Southeast Region, through an aggressive At-Risk species conservation effort, is strengthening existing partnerships, building new ones, and completing a range of conservation actions with the partners, including better surveys and monitoring.  As a result, to date, more than 75 species across the region do not need the ESA’s protection.  Another dozen species’ status has improved from endangered to threatened and in some cases, like the Louisiana black bear, the species have been recovered and removed from the list.   

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.  For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov/southeast.  Connect with us on Facebook atwww.facebook.com/usfwssoutheast, follow our tweets at www.twitter.com/usfwssoutheast, watch our YouTube Channel at http://www.youtube.com/usfws, and download photos from our Flickr page at http://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwssoutheast

 


“The endangered Barbary macaque could get a new chance at survival at CITES CoP17”

September 27, 2016, Johannesburg - For the first time in 30 years, Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will discuss increasing the level of protection for a monkey species. Barbary macaques will take center stage in Johannesburg, alongside emblematic fauna such as elephants, lions, rhinos and sharks.

The CITES Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17), which is currently taking place in South Africa, has the power to change the fate of Barbary macaques and stop their race towards extinction. In an almost unprecedented move, all range States and the main consumer countries providing the market for these animals have rallied together behind a joint Morocco-EU proposal to transfer the species to Appendix I of the Convention, which will afford them the highest level of international protection from trade and help enhance enforcement measures against trafficking in this species. The proposal has also received overwhelming support from the global animal welfare and conservation community. 

The Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus) is the only African primate species north of the Sahara, the only macaque species in Africa and the only non-human primate living in the wild in Europe (Gibraltar). In the last 30 years, the populations of this unique primate in Morocco and Algeria have dwindled from approximately 23,000 to the latest estimates of 6,500 – 9,100. The largest wild subpopulation, which inhabits the mixed cedar forests of the Middle Atlas Mountains in Morocco, has been decimated: only 5,000 remain, a 65% decrease in just three decades.

A significant number of Barbary macaques, mostly infants, are illegally captured from the wild and traded every year, mainly to feed the European exotic pet trade and to be used as tourist photo props. The protection granted to the species both in Morocco and Algeria, its listing on Appendix II of CITES and an EU import ban have done little to help curb poaching and trafficking in these intelligent and sensitive endangered primates. This criminal activity is increasingly in the hands of organized international networks. Barbary macaques remain the most frequently seized CITES-listed live mammal in the EU.

Animal Defenders International (ADI) President Jan Creamer says: “The illegal trade is pushing Barbary macaques to the brink and action must be taken before it is too late. Like so many wild animals, these little monkeys are paying the price for unscrupulous traders bartering with their lives.” It is estimated that approximately 3,000 Barbary macaques could be currently being kept as pets in Europe.
 
Musician Moby said: "I refuse to stand by and do nothing as these endangered monkeys are snatched from the wild and their families for photo props and the pet trade. Barbary macaques need our urgent help and I hope governments will join ADI and 'back the macaque' and grant them the greater protection they need".

Gerben Jan Gerbrandy, Member of the European Parliament for D66 and Head of the European Parliament Delegation to CoP17, agrees on the importance of this moment: “The adoption of the joint proposal from the EU and Morocco would be a key next step in protecting a species for which the EU is unfortunately a key destination market. Now we have to make sure that any agreement is properly and coherently enforced to the fullest effect. That is where the real difference will be made.”

North Africa is the gateway to Europe for other illegal wildlife products, including live specimens such as endangered tortoises. Tackling Barbary macaque trafficking is expected to help with protection of other endangered species, some of which are also on the agenda at CoP17.  

"This truly unique and endangered primate species needs all the protection we can provide as international community. The highest possible protection from CITES will strengthen conservation efforts underway to help the Barbary macaque survive and thrive. It makes total sense to support the range states, Morocco and Algeria, in this goal," adds Rikkert Reijnen of the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

Highly intelligent, emotional and sensitive, Barbary macaques live up to 22 years of age, in social groups comprising as many as 80 individuals, with males playing a primary role in caring for their young. They prefer high altitude cedar forests, but can also be found in oak forests, coastal scrub, and rocky slopes, feeding on fruits, tree leaves, and plants.

Having campaigned for over 20 years to educate the public about the use of primates for entertainment, research, and as pets, exposing the huge numbers of animals taken from the wild each year and the suffering of the animals during captivity and transport, the plight of the Barbary macaque is a cause close to the heart of Animal Defenders International (ADI).
 
Last year, ADI rescued more than 30 illegally traded monkeys in Peru during an 18-month mission against wildlife trafficking and to enforce a ban on wild animals in circuses. Over 100 animals were saved during the operation. Having nursed the monkeys back to health, ADI relocated new family groups from six different primate species to sanctuaries in their native Amazon habitats where ADI continues to fund their care for life.
 
ADI previously rescued two Hamadryas baboons – one from a Bolivian circus and the other from the pet trade in Cyprus. They now live happily together at the Lakeview Monkey Sanctuary in the UK, where ADI funds their care for life, along with three macaques born at the notorious and now closed Israeli monkey breeder Mazor Farm. Born to wild-caught parents, Baloo, Betty and Boo were sold to a European research laboratory and used in neurology experiments. When the monkeys were no longer required, ADI stepped in to save them from being killed.

Scientific support for the proposal

Dr. Shirley McGreal of the International Primate Protection League has also expressed strong support: “I am at the NAPSA (North American Primate Alliance) conference in Tacoma and of course IPPL is delighted that Morocco and the EU have proposed the elevation of the Barbary macaque to Appendix I of CITES. There are less of them in the world than there are humans in the small town where I live!”   

Dr. John Cortes, co-editor of The Barbary Macaque: Biology, Management and Conservation (2006) has been a long-time defender of the species: “I fully support and endorse the proposal. As Minister for the Environment in Gibraltar, a range State for the Barbary Macaque, and familiar with the species in North Africa, I agree fully with the statement and its aims.”

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Efforts to increase protection and better conservation measures for Barbary macaques are being led by the following organizations:

AAP Animal Advocacy and Protection, www.aap.nl/en


Animal Defenders International, www.ad-international.org

Born Free Foundation and Born Free Foundation USA, www.bornfree.org

Eurogroup for Animals, www.eurogroupforanimals.org

Fondation Brigitte Bardot, www.fondationbrigittebardot.fr

Fondation Franz Weber, www.ffw.ch

Humane Society International, www.hsi.org

International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), www.ifaw.org

International Primate Protection League, www.ippl.org

Pro Wildlife, www.pro-wildlife.de

Species Survival Network, www.ssn.org


 
Animal Defenders International (ADI) is active worldwide to end the suffering of captive animals in commercial use: animals used in entertainment – film, television, advertising, circuses and sport or leisure such as hunting or for products such as fur. Replacement of animals in scientific research; funding and promotion of non-animal advanced methods. ADI investigates, produces evidence and reports on the scientific, legal and economic issues for each case study, recommending solutions. Information is distributed to the media, public and officials. Where ADI’s evidence has been a catalyst for change, we collaborate with governments to conduct large scale seizures or rescues of wild animals in captivity and relocate them to forever homes – back to their natural habitat wherever possible.  http://www.ad-international.org
Animal Defenders International: Ending the suffering of animals in captivity and protecting wild animals and their environments
 
 

 

More than 800 fur items, worth an estimated $1.5 million and representing approximately 26,000 animals killed, have been donated and distributed to wildlife rehabilitation centers across U.S.

Washington, D.C.,  September 21, 2016, -- Today, Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, announced its third annual “Fur for the Animals” campaign: a donation drive to collect unwanted fur coats and accessories, which are repurposed and sent to wildlife rehabilitation centers around the country to help comfort orphaned and injured wildlife.

Since the initiative began in 2014, more than 800 fur items, worth more than $1.5 million and representing approximately 26,000 animals killed, have been donated to Born Free USA and distributed to wildlife rehabilitation centers around the U.S.

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, “Since we launched this campaign in 2014, we have seen an overwhelming outpouring of donations from across the globe: fur coats, scarves, hats, gloves, pillows, toys, and more. Frequently, the donations arrive with exceptionally moving thank-you notes from people relieved to find a worthy use for unwanted fur. These are often inherited items or regretted fashion decisions that have stayed in closets and storage units for years, until the owners heard about Fur for the Animals. The success of this campaign illustrates that consumers increasingly want nothing to do with fur in fashion. While urging people to not buy fur, we also provide an answer with fur already purchased: put it to good use by comforting wildlife.”

“Fur comes only from misery and death, and the demand feeds a barbaric and cruel industry. The fur that has come to our office over the past three years came from tens of thousands of animals who all suffered tremendously,” Roberts explains.

Born Free USA’s Fur for the Animals campaign comes two weeks after the organization released its shocking undercover trapping investigation, Victims of Vanity II, which reveals brutal, dangerous, and sometimes illegal trapping on both private and public land—all to supply the fur industry. Born Free USA hopes to reduce the supply, demand, and social acceptance of fur not only by showing the truth about trapping, but by taking fur out of circulation wherever possible and giving it back to where it belongs: with the animals.

Once collected, Born Free USA will continue to send the fur to wildlife rehabilitation centers and sanctuaries, including: The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center (Ramona, CA), Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation (Kendalia, TX), Blue Ridge Wildlife Center (Boyce, VA), and Born Free USA’s newest campaign partners: OPR Coastal Primate Sanctuary (Longview, WA), Cleveland Amory Black Beauty Ranch (Murchison, TX), and Wild Animal Sanctuary (Keenesburg, CO). For a full list of partners, visit www.bornfreeusa.org/furdrive. Additional wildlife rehabilitation partners are welcome, and they can learn more by contacting This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  

Fur for the Animals runs from September 21 to December 31, 2016. To donate, fur can be dropped off in person or shipped to Born Free USA, 2300 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Suite 100B, Washington, D.C. 20007 before December 31, 2016.

Born Free USA commends the growing number of fashion retailers vowing to go fur free.  In March 2016, Giorgio Armani announced it will be removing animal fur from its collections beginning with its Fall/Winter 2016 line. Armani has joined such brands as Hugo Boss, H&M, Steve Madden, Marks & Spencer, Topshop, and Zara. For a full list of fur free fashion retailers, click here.     

Born Free USA is a member of Fur Free Alliance: an international coalition of animal protection organizations working to bring an end to the exploitation and killing of animals for their fur. Fur Free Alliance represents more than 40 animal protection organizations in 28 countries, and has millions of supporters worldwide. 

Born Free USA is a nationally recognized leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic “pets,” trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to North America the message of “compassionate conservation”—the vision of the United Kingdom-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free USA’s mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

 

Conference in Johannesburg, South Africa, September 24 - October 5, 2016

Washington, D.C., September 19, 2016 -- Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, will urge delegates at the 17th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) to make precautionary decisions with respect to wildlife and international trade. Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, will be in attendance at the conference in Johannesburg, South Africa, September 24 - October 5, 2016.

The international wildlife trade is estimated to be worth billions of dollars annually and includes millions of animals who are traded as trophies, pets, medicine, and more. After habitat destruction, exploitation of wild specimens for trade is a main reason for the critical decline of global biodiversity. CITES is one of the most effective global instruments to counter the depletion of wildlife species for trade. CITES accords varying degrees of protection to more than 30,000 species of animals and plants that are threatened by overexploitation. With 183 Parties bound by the Convention, CITES is the largest conservation agreement in existence. 

According to Roberts, “This meeting is the most important call to save wildlife. And, people are watching and waiting for outcomes.  Armed militia and sophisticated organized crime networks are operating across continents to slaughter and trade wildlife for profit. Traffickers and other profiteers are watching closely to see what happens if the trades in elephant ivory and rhino horn are reopened. Any signal from CITES that there is profitability in this deadly trade will result in animal carcasses unceremoniously littering the African savannah and forests. CITES Parties must act with precaution to adopt sufficient measures to ensure that international trade will not lead to the extinction of species for future generations. The outcome of this conference can change everything.”

Born Free USA will be there to focus on a number of important issues, among them:

African Elephants: Africa’s elephants remain beleaguered by poaching for their ivory tusks, and some populations could disappear forever without significant action. Born Free USA will be supporting Kenya’s call to uplist all of Africa’s elephants back to Appendix I, thereby closing any chance for trade that is primarily commercial. Going back to the 1989 ban will dry up ivory markets and reduce elephant poaching. Similarly, the organization will work to defeat certain southern African countries that will be trying to facilitate international trade once again.   

Rhinoceros: Swaziland is proposing limited trade in rhino horn, which could seriously threaten the continent’s remaining estimated 25,000 black and white rhinos. Born Free USA will urge Parties to reject Swaziland’s proposal as the trade in rhino horn, like elephant ivory, leads to poaching. Rhinoceros horns are highly sought after in Asia because of false local beliefs in their medicinal properties. According to Roberts, “A resumption of rhino horn trade would have a devastating impact on this species already poached close to extinction.”

African and Asian Pangolins: Born Free USA believes that all eight species of pangolins—four in Africa and four in Asia—should be on CITES Appendix I. Roberts explains, “Pangolins are the most heavily-traded mammal in the world and are at risk from trade in their scales as medicines—despite a complete lack of efficacy in medicinal use. Pangolins are disappearing fast and a ban must be secured on international commercial trade.”

African Lions: Having successfully petitioned for the addition of Africa’s lions to the list of endangered species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, at CITES, Born Free USA will be supporting the proposal submitted by Niger, along with many other lion range States, to uplist lions from Appendix II to Appendix I. “Lions are not only subjected to an international trade in trophies, but are also increasingly targeted by the international trade of their bones, which replace tiger bones in Asian folk remedies. This commercial trade is having an increasingly prejudicial impact on the species.” Read the proposal.

For more information about key issues Born Free USA will be involved with at CITES, visit www.bornfreeusa.org/cites. Born Free USA will be on Twitter and Facebook throughout the conference with live updates.

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, the organization leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic “pets,” trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to North America the message of “compassionate conservation”—the vision of the United Kingdom-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free USA’s mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

 

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 “Meet the Animal Artist” Experience Added to Oakland Zoo’s Animals Saving Animals Annual Art Auction

Video Download for Media: https://www.dropbox.com/s/z95s1cgbcfrvanq/ArtExperience.mov?dl=0https://www.dropbox.com/s/z95s1cgbcfrvanq/ArtExperience.mov?dl=0 

Oakland, Calif. -- September 15, 2016 -- Oakland Zoo has added a new twist to the third year of their annual “Animals Saving Animals Art Show” to raise money for animal conservation. Bidding winners get to come to the Zoo to be part of the painting experience with the animal artist.

Zoos across the country now sell animal paintings as a way to fundraise, but Oakland Zoo wanted to enhance the concept by personalizing the experience. “We saw that people bought these artworks to connect with the animals, so we decided to offer an experience where people could meet an animal artist up-close and behind-the-scenes, for the ‘creative’ painting process.’ It’s an amazing way to connect with animals at the Zoo, support animal conservation in the wild – and, of course, acquire unique artwork,” said Erin Harrison, Sr. Manager of Marketing & PR at Oakland Zoo.

Artwork created by zoo animals is up for auction on eBay now through Thursday, September 22 at 11am. Artists featured in the Animal Art Show Experience include an elephant, lemur, goat, sun bear, giraffe, parrot, and green monkey. For a complete list of artist names, biographies and bidding link, and additional information on Oakland Zoo’s Animal Art Show Experience, go to: http://www.oaklandzoo.org/Animal_Art_Show_2016.php

“The Animal Art Show Experience is a triple win; it provides fun enrichment activity for our animals, helps support the conservation of wildlife, and draws public attention to the various conservation challenges that animals face,” said Amy Gotliffe, Conservation Director at Oakland Zoo. “The Animal Art Show is also a perfect example of how the entire Oakland Zoo staff embraces our conservation efforts, from our Marketing Department to our Animal Care team. We hope the lucky winners of this unique art know that they took action for wildlife every time they look at it.”

None of the animals are forced or coerced into participating in the Art Show. The painting sessions are conducted with zookeepers, using only positive-reinforcement methods to encourage voluntary participation. The paint used is non-toxic and water based. All funds raised from the auction will benefit Oakland Zoo’s conservation partners, who are working in the field to save wild animals.

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area's award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid's activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to the humane treatment of animals and wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide; with 25¢ from each ticket donated to support conservation partners and programs around the world. The California Trail, a transformational project that more than doubles our size, opens in 2018,

and will further our commitment to animal care, education, and conservation with a focus on this state’s remarkable native wildlife. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information, go to: www.oaklandzoo.org

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