Talkin' Pets News

May 19, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo - Celestrial Custom Dog Services

Producer - Daisy Charlotte

Network Producer - Darian Sims/Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer / Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests - Robert Likins, VP Government Affairs for PIJAC will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 5/19/18 at 5pm EST to discuss United Airlines policy on flying pets besides dogs and cats

Dr. David Young will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 5/19/18 at 630pm EST to discuss his fight to get his dog back that is on Death Row for attacking an intrusive neighbor on his property

Talkin' Pets News

March 10, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Maria Ryan - DogGone Positive

Producer - Zach Budin

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Anne Wheaton author of Piggy and Pug will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 3/10/18 at 630pm EST to discuss and give away her new book

Mara Bovsun, Features Editor at AKC Family Dog along with the DWAA will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 3/10/18 at 720pm EDT to discuss DWAA’s new program, “Young Writers on the Web,”

Walt Disney Studios and Marvel Entertainment has just released on Blu Ray, DVD, Digital, “THOR: RAGNAROK” and you can win a gift box this Saturday 3/10/18 on Talkin' Pets, game play will be announced each hour 5-8pm EDT

Talkin' Pets News

March 3, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Anne Lampru - Animal Alternatives

Producer - Zach Budin

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

From one of the country’s foremost doctors and now New York Times bestselling author comes a step-by-step plan for diagnosing, treating and healing Lyme and other chronic diseases.

HOW CAN I GET BETTER?

An Action Plan for Treating Resistant Lyme and Chronic Disease

Dr. Richard Horowitz

Since its release in the fall of 2013, Dr. Horowitz's groundbreaking text on Lyme and chronic disease Why Can’t I Get Better? has been an extraordinary success, selling close to 50,000 copies across formats to date with a media platform that is increasing every day. Now, in HOW CAN I GET BETTER?:  An Action Plan for Treating Resistant Lyme and Chronic Disease (SMP OS February 14, 2017), a new handbook, he provides what everyone suffering desperately needs: a direct, actionable step by step plan for implementing his 16-point MSIDS Diagnostic Map in the treatment of Lyme and Chronic Disease, along with the research updates that guide his treatment and new stories pulled from his practice that show how healing is possible.

The ongoing debate over Lyme disease as a chronic illness has made it difficult for patients to find appropriate care, as they are often misdiagnosed with such diseases as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Multiple Sclerosis, an auto-immune disorder, or even a psychiatric condition. Meanwhile, answers are elusive and doctors knowledgeable in treating remain few. At the same time, the number of cases is growing astoundingly each year, reaching epidemic proportions. Specific and accessible, HOW CAN I GET BETTER? is an all-in-one source to guide doctors and patients alike in  identifying  symptoms and working together for the best possible treatment outcome.

RICHARD I. HOROWITZ is a board-certified MD specializing in Internal Medicine. He and his wife, Lee, founded the Hudson Valley Healing Arts Center in Hyde Park, New York, which has treated over 12,000 patients for tick-borne diseases over the past twenty-six years. Dr. Horowitz is known for his pioneering work with Lyme disease and is recognized to be one of the country’s foremost experts on chronic illness.

ABOUT THE BOOK

HOW CAN I GET BETTER?: An Action Plan for Treating Resistant Lyme and Chronic Disease

Author: Dr. Richard Horowitz

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

On sale: February 14, 2017

U.S. ISBN: 9781250070548 / $18.99

U.S. Ebook ISBN: 9781250111449 / $9.99

 

 

APRIL 2017

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 

May is National Pet Month and More

Spring is a time to recharge, shake off that cabin fever and get back to life outside as the weather warms. Take time during May to remind patient families to celebrate these holidays or address these areas of topic with their pets:

National Pet Month: Celebrate your pet all month long!

Flea and Tick Prevention: Humans and pets aren't the only animals coming out of hiberation! Be sure to advise patients to treat and protect their pets from fleas, ticks and other common pests. 

Microchipping: Make sure your patients have ID tags and/or microchips to keep them safe and easy to find when they're lost! We recently featured an article on our blog during National Pet ID Week.

Spring Cleaning Safety: Make sure patient families are aware of ways to protect the health of their pets during the annual spring cleaning festivities and rituals!  Tell them they can learn more by downloading our new "Spring Guide for Senior Pets" eBook.

Buy Neutricks Directly From Us Via Our New Web Store

March and April were busy for us, and part of what we were working on included the launch of our new Neutricks Web Store, where we've made it easier for you to buy Neutricks for Dogs and Neutricks for Cats directly from us! 

Cognitive Health Resources for Veterinarians

The Neutricks Vet Portal is an area on the Neutricks website that provides research, marketing materials, a vet directory and other resources for veterinarians to ensure you are have what you need to promote, educate and consult on Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome with your patients.

  
 

LISTEN FOR NEUTRICKS ON "TALKIN' PETS WITH JON PATCH"

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Thanks for reading!

Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA


 

RALEIGH, N.C. (September 20, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, is pleased to announce ongoing progress through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative.

Launched in February 2016, this comprehensive Initiative addresses important health concerns that include Lyme disease, bartonellosis, and ehrlichiosis, through much-needed research in diagnostics, disease pathogenesis and prevalence. Tick-borne diseases are an important group of emerging infectious diseases that impact both dogs and their people. As the geographic range of ticks continues to expand, all dogs can be affected by these diseases, year-round.

Through a $100,000 leadership gift from Kiki Courtelis, a longtime friend to animal health, and a combined $50,000 gift from the English Springer Spaniel Foundation and English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association, as well as generous gifts from many individuals, dog clubs, and foundations, the donations raised toward the Initiative, and matched by the American Kennel Club, are driving further progress in this important research for dogs. 

“When my veterinarian tells me that he diagnoses Lyme disease at least three times a week, I thought it was worthwhile to find an organization truly attacking these diseases to improve testing, treatment and cures,” said Kiki Courtelis.  “It means the world to me that I'm blessed to participate in CHF’s initiative, and be a part of improving the health of the dogs we love so much.”

To date, donations to the Initiative have resulted in the Foundation awarding a first round of five grants to improve diagnostics and enhance practical understanding of tick-borne diseases, including effects of these infections on blood cells, the canine blood donor population, disease prevalence in dogs, and treatment recommendations.

According to Mark Haglin, English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association president, “We have had many encounters over the years with tick-borne disease in our Springer Spaniels and we are very proud to play a role in this Initiative. Being closely associated with friends who are dealing with the devastating effects of Lyme disease, I hope these grants will bring some crossover results on the human side of treatment as well.”

“The Foundation chose this area of research important to canine health because we believe we can have an immediate and long-lasting impact on these diseases in dogs and their human companions,” said Dr. Diane Brown, CHF CEO. “Since launching the Initiative, many of CHF’s supporters have shared stories of a beloved dog being diagnosed with a tick-borne disease like babesiosis, anaplasmosis, or bartonellosis, or a human family member or friend with a diagnosis of Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis or Rocky Mountain spotted fever. The stories remind us of the urgent need to address these diseases that afflict dogs and people.”

To learn more about CHF’s Tick-Borne Disease Initiative, including research outcomes, free educational resources, and additional RFP announcements, visit www.akcchf.org/ticks. “Tick-borne diseases can surprise you, and the need for accurate diagnosis, proper treatment and prevention is critical,” said Brown.

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs and foundations, and individuals who are committed to the betterment of canine health through scientific research. During 2016, donations from new and lapsed donors (last donation 12/31/2013), will be generously matched for research dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club. Make an impact and double your donation today!

 # # #

About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (July 25, 2016) – The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to prevent, treat and cure diseases in all dogs, announces a second round of new grants awarded through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative. This comprehensive Initiative addresses important health concerns that include Lyme disease, bartonellosis, and ehrlichiosis, through much-needed research in diagnostics, disease pathogenesis and prevalence.

Edward B. Breitschwerdt, DVM, DACVIM, of North Carolina State University, will study “Enhanced Testing for the Diagnosis of Bartonellosis in Dogs.” Bartonellosis is a potentially life-threatening zoonotic disease distributed throughout the world by approximately ten different Bartonella bacteria species. Bartonella bacteria are transmitted to dogs and humans by ticks, fleas, lice, mites, and sand flies. Due to a lack of sensitive and reliable diagnostic tests, definitive diagnosis of bartonellosis in dogs remains a significant problem. Because these bacteria invade cells and infect tissues throughout the body, this chronic intracellular infection is difficult to cure with currently used antibiotic regimens. Dr. Breitschwerdt and his team aim to develop improved blood tests for bartonellosis in dogs that can also be used for world-wide sero-epidemiological prevalence studies, and to establish early and accurate diagnosis.

Pedro Paul Diniz, DVM, PhD, of Western University of Health Sciences, will study “Broad-Range Detection of Canine Tick-Borne Disease and Improved Diagnostics Using Next-Generation Sequencing.” Currently available tests for vector-borne diseases in dogs rely on previously known DNA sequences of each pathogen, with little room for detecting new or emerging organisms. This results in false negatives for tick-borne diseases, leaving veterinarians and dog owners frustrated by a lack of definitive diagnosis. Using an innovative approach, Dr. Diniz and team will employ next-generation sequencing (NGS) to overcome the limitations of current diagnostic technology. Testing samples from dogs naturally exposed to tick-borne diseases, NGS will detect not only new organisms but also characterize genetic differences among known organisms. The resulting dataset of a large number of DNA sequences of known tick-borne organisms and previously undetected organisms in naturally-infected dogs will support the development of diagnostic tools to simultaneously advance canine and human health.

In addition to these two new grants, earlier this year the AKC Canine Health Foundation awarded three grants through its Tick-Borne Disease Initiative. The three grants address Lyme disease, vector-borne disease testing for canine blood donors, and ehrlichiosis. 

Funding for CHF grants comes from a number of sources, including: corporations, dog clubs, and individuals who are committed to the betterment of canine health through scientific research. During 2016, all donations to the Tick-Borne Disease Initiative are being matched dollar-for-dollar by the American Kennel Club (up to $250,000). Make an impact and double your donation today: www.akcchf.org/ticks.  

 # # #

About CHF 
For more than 20 years, the Raleigh, NC-based AKC Canine Health Foundation has leveraged the power of science and research to improve the lives of dogs and their people. The Foundation works to prevent, treat, and cure diseases that impact all dogs, while providing professional information and resources for a new breed of dog owner. Take action because you care; find out more online at www.akcchf.org.

BUGS RULE!
An Introduction to the World of Insects

Whitney Cranshaw & Richard Redak


"Breadth classes dealing with insects have been extremely popular among science and nonscience majors for decades. The photographs, illustrations, little known facts, and sidebars in BUGS RULE! bring to life the fascinating world of insects. BUGS RULE! is an excellent text for the nonscience major and general nature enthusiast.”
—Michael K. Rust, University of California, Riverside

BUGS RULE!: An Introduction to the World of Insects (Pub date: September 25, 2013), by Whitney Cranshaw and Richard Redak, provides a lively introduction to the biology and natural history of insects and their noninsect cousins, such as spiders, scorpions, and centipedes. This richly illustrated textbook features more than 830 color photos, a concise overview of the basics of entomology, and numerous sidebars that highlight and explain key points. Detailed chapters cover each of the major insect groups, describing their physiology, behaviors, feeding habits, reproduction, human interactions, and more.
Ideal for nonscience majors and anyone seeking to learn more about insects and their arthropod relatives, BUGS RULE! offers a one-of-a-kind gateway into the world of these amazing creatures.
(more)
•    Places a greater emphasis on natural history than standard textbooks on the subject
•    Covers the biology and natural history of all the insect orders
•    Provides a thorough review of the noninsect arthropods, such as spiders, scorpions, centipedes, millipedes, and crustaceans
•    Features more than 830 color photos
•    Highlights the importance of insects and other arthropods, including their impact on human society
•    An online illustration package is available to professors
About the Authors:
Whitney Cranshaw is professor of entomology at Colorado State University. He is the author of Garden Insects of North America (Princeton). Richard Redak is professor of entomology at the University of California, Riverside. Both authors have years of experience teaching introductory entomology classes.


BUGS RULE!
An Introduction to the World of Insects

Whitney Cranshaw & Richard Redak
Cloth | ISBN13: 978-0-691-12495-7 | $55.00 / £37.95
e-book | ISBN13: 978-1-400-84892-8
472 pp. | 8 x 10 | 830+ color photos. 18 tables.
Publication Date: September 25, 2013

 

Experts Predicting 2012 to be one of the Worst for Lyme Disease Risk

Insect Shield Repellent Apparel & Gear Offers Protection for the Entire Family

40,000 cases of lyme disease are documented in the US alone every year and health experts are predicting 2012 to be the worst year for Lyme risk ever. A warm winter combined with and a lean harvest of acorns are adding to this risk. Acorns? According to a recent article in the New York Times, a lack of acorns results in a smaller population of rodents - meaning that ticks will be looking for other hosts - us! http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/03/nyregion/boom-and-bust-in-acorns-will-affect-many-creatures-including-humans.html

Here are some helpful tick-prevention strategies to keep you, your family and pet protected this summer:

1.) YOUR YARD: Ticks are not out in the middle of your lawn, they live where yards border wooded areas, or anywhere it is shaded and there are leaves with high humidity. Place a layer of wood chips between your grass yard and the woods edge. Ticks are attracted to the wood chips because of the shade and moisture it provides.

2.) TICK CHECKS: Do periodic tick checks (on yourself, children and pets) and carefully remove any found. (Wear light colored clothing so ticks are easier to find.)

3.) OUTDOOR PURSUITS: When on a hike, bike, or walk try to remain in the center of a trail in order to minimize your exposure. Remember - ticks cannot fly, they crawl up. Avoid sitting directly on the ground, woodpiles or fallen logs - areas where ticks love to live.

4.) PERSONAL PROTECTION: Wear tick repellent clothing. Insect Shield repellent apparel is EPA registered to repel ticks (as well as a variety of other pesky and potentially dangerous insects.) The repellency is odorless, invisible and long-lasting. Insect Shield apparel is available for adults, kids and even your dog!

Video – How Insect Shield Works http://youtu.be/iSoYLlGu_8g

Insect Shield Product Categories:

Gardening

Gardening Hats & Accessories Insect Shield Camping/Backyard

Insect Shield Bug Repellent Hammock

Insect Shield Bug Hut Tent

Insect Shield Camping/Deck Chairs

Insect Shield Bunk Sack

Insect Shield Mosquito Nets

Insect Shield Coolmax Adapter Cover

Insect Shield Outdoor/Adventure Travel Apparel

Lightweight outdoor clothing and accessories that offer bug/sun protection for the entire family.

Hiking

Insect Shield Hiking Gaiters – Adults/Kid’s Youth

Kids outdoor apparel and accessories

Work Wear

Insect Shield protective work wear www.insectshield.com/work Pets

Insect Shield Dog Apparel and Accessories

Quick Facts

Experts Predicting 2012 to be one of the Worst for Lyme Disease Risk

Insect Shield Repellent Apparel & Gear Offers Protection for the Entire Family

40,000 cases of lyme disease are documented in the US alone every year.

Do periodic tick checks (on yourself, children and pets) and carefully remove any found.

When on a hike, bike, or walk try to remain in the center of a trail in order to minimize your exposure. Remember - ticks cannot fly, they crawl up.

Avoid sitting directly on the ground, woodpiles or fallen logs - areas where ticks love to live.

Insect Shield repellent apparel is EPA registsred to repel ticks (as well as a variety of other pesky and potentially dangerous insects.)

www.insectshield.com

 

Cat owners should keep cats indoors, use tick preventatives to reduce chance of disease

COLUMBIA, Mo. ­—Lone Star ticks, which are notorious carriers of many diseases including cytauxzoonosis, or “bobcat fever,” have been spreading across the nation in recent years. As a result, cats across much of the country are now exposed to the deadly disease. University of Missouri veterinarian Leah Cohn, a small animal disease expert, and Adam Birkenheuer from North Carolina State University, have found an effective treatment for the dangerous disease.

“Previous treatment methods have only been able to save less than 25 percent of infected cats, but our method, which is now being used by veterinarians across the country, has been shown to save about 60 percent of infected cats,” Cohn said. “While that number isn’t as high as we’d like due to the deadly nature of the disease, our method is the first truly effective way to combat the disease.”

Routinely carried by bobcats and mountain lions, Cohn and Birkenheuer also found that bobcat fever can even infect tigers. All types of cats, but only cats, can catch bobcat fever. Cohn calls the disease the “Ebola virus for cats,” saying that it is a very quick and painful death for cats that succumb from the infection. Bobcat fever is easily spread between cats through tick bites, but Cohn and Birkenheuer found that the disease is not readily passed down through birth like malaria and many other protozoan diseases.

“Bobcat fever affects healthy outdoor cats the most, because they are the most likely to get bitten by ticks,” Cohn said. “The disease acts very quickly and can kill a cat less than a week after it begins to show signs of being sick, so it is important to get treatment from a veterinarian as soon as the cat appears ill.”

Cohn says the best way for cat owners to prevent their cats from catching bobcat fever is to keep them indoors as much as possible. Early symptoms of the disease include sluggishness and refusal to eat. Pet owners who also have dogs should use tick collars, because while dogs are not susceptible to the disease, they can bring infected ticks into contact with house cats. Cohn says tick preventatives for cats also can help, but owners should be sure to check with their veterinarians to make sure they use cat-specific products, as tick collars for dogs can be harmful to cats.

Cohn says her future research involves creating a vaccine to protect cats against bobcat fever. Her work has been published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, the Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and the Journal of Veterinary Parasitology.