Delivery Scanning Technology Linked to Decrease from 2016

April 05, 2018 


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"Any dog can bite" poster

SAN DIEGO — The number of postal employees attacked by dogs nationwide reached 6,244 in 2017 — more than 500 fewer than 2016. Today, the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is showcasing technology that alerts mail carriers of potential attacks while releasing its annual list of cities where the most dog attacks were recorded. The organization also highlights safety initiatives to help protect its employees and offers tips to pet owners.

“We’re encouraged by the decrease in dog attacks,” said U.S. Postal Service Safety Director Linda DeCarlo in San Diego, where postal employees suffered 46 attacks — the fifth ranked city in 2017. “The totals are still too high, but we’re confident that with continuing education and dog bite prevention training, along with advancing technology, we can keep more people safe and keep attacks trending downward.”

Enhancing Employee Safety
DeCarlo highlights USPS safety measures that alert mail carriers to dogs on their delivery routes. The Package Pickup application on usps.com asks customers to indicate if there are dogs at their addresses when they schedule package pickups. This information is provided to carriers on their delivery scanners which send alerts if an unleashed dog is reported in a delivery area.

“The scanners that our carriers use to confirm a customer’s delivery include a feature for them to indicate the presence of a dog at an individual address,” said DeCarlo. “This information is particularly helpful for substitute carriers who fill in for regular carriers on their days off.”

 information provided to carriers on delivery scanner

DeCarlo is in San Diego Thursday, April 5, to kick off National Dog Bite Prevention Week, which runs Sunday, April 8, through Saturday, April 14. The Postal Service, joined by the American Humane, American Veterinary Medical Association, Insurance Information Institute and State Farm Insurance, is driving home the message that dog bites are a national issue and education can resolve the issue.

Half of the 4.5 million Americans bitten by dogs annually are children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

DeCarlo gave the following tips and encouraged sharing them using the hashtag #preventdogbites. A video on dog bite prevention tips is available on the Postal Service’s YouTube channel.

  • If a carrier delivers mail or packages to your front door, place your dog in a separate room and close that door before opening the front door. Some dogs burst through screen doors or plate-glass windows to attack visitors. Dog owners should keep the family pet secured.
  • Parents should remind their children and other family members not to take mail directly from carriers in the presence of the family pet, as the dog may view the person handing mail to a family member as a threatening gesture.
  • The Postal Service places the safety of its employees as a top priority. If a carrier feels threatened by a dog, or if a dog is loose or unleashed, the owner may be asked to pick up mail at a Post Office until the carrier is assured the pet has been restrained. If a dog is roaming the neighborhood, the pet owner’s neighbors also may be asked to pick up their mail at the area’s Post Office.

American Humane, the country’s first national humane organization, estimates that more than 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year with 800,000 seeking medical attention for these bites — more than half of them being children.

“Two-thirds of the injuries occurring in children four years or younger are to the head or neck region, and studies have also shown that the greatest percentage of dog-bite fatalities occurred among children and unsupervised newborns left with dogs — something that should never occur,” said Mark Stubis, chief communications officer, American Humane.  “To help, American Humane offers a free online booklet, ‘Pet Meets Baby,’ with valuable information on introducing a new child to a home with a pet — or a new pet into a home with a child available for families with children.”

Insurance company State Farm reports that in 2017, it paid more than $132 million as a result of 3,618 dog-related injury claims. The average cost paid per claim was $36,573. “State Farm is also one of the few insurance companies that does not exclude homeowner or renter insurance coverage because of the breed of dog owned,” said Heather Paul, State Farm public affairs specialist. “The company reinforces that responsible pet ownership and educating children about how to safely interact with dogs is key to reducing dog bites.”

“Veterinarians see firsthand the needless heartbreak a dog bite can cause,” said Dr. Mike Topper, AVMA President. “We know that dog bites are not a breed-specific issue and that any dog can bite. We also know that most bites can be prevented through education. Your veterinarian and the AVMA have extensive resources designed to keep your pup, no matter what their breed, a happy, healthy member of your family and community.

2017 Dog Attack Rankings by City
A total of 6,244 postal employees were attacked by dogs in 2017. The top 30 city rankings are below. Some cities share the same rankings as they experienced the same number of attacks.

 

Office City

Office State

CY-17

CY-16

1  

HOUSTON

TX

71

62

2  

LOS ANGELES

CA

67

80

3  

ST LOUIS

MO

52

31

4  

CLEVELAND

OH

49

60

5  

SAN DIEGO

CA

46

57

6  

BALTIMORE

MD

44

36

6  

SAN ANTONIO

TX

44

42

7  

COLUMBUS

OH

43

39

8  

DALLAS

TX

40

41

9  

LOUISVILLE

KY

39

51

10 

CHICAGO

IL

38

46

11 

DENVER

CO

35

47

12 

LONG BEACH

CA

32

22

12 

DETROIT

MI

32

48

12 

KANSAS CITY

MO

32

30

13 

OAKLAND

CA

28

23

13 

SEATTLE

WA

28

31

14 

MINNEAPOLIS

MN

27

43

14 

CHARLOTTE

NC

27

33

14 

PHILADELPHIA

PA

27

40

15 

SAN JOSE

CA

26

21

15 

FORT WORTH

TX

26

33

16 

MIAMI

FL

25

15

16 

INDIANAPOLIS

IN

25

44

16 

ROCHESTER

NY

25

11

16 

CINCINNATI

OH

25

24

16 

TOLEDO

OH

25

18

17 

PHOENIX

AZ

24

35

17 

SACRAMENTO

CA

24

30

17 

PORTLAND

OR

24

41

The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.

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Alley Cat Allies Deploys Resources to Gulf Coast for Hurricane Recovery

HOUSTON – Sept. 3, 2017 – Alley Cat Allies has deployed an expert, bilingual disaster response team and is sending additional resources to help Texas and Louisiana organizations rescue cats and other animals whose lives continue to be in peril because of Hurricane Harvey.

“Many people and animals have been displaced, shelters are overflowing and families were forced to make difficult decisions about what to do with their animals,” said Becky Robinson, president and founder of Alley Cat Allies. “There are many cats and other animals who haven’t eaten for days and may be lost from their homes. We are eager to help the courageous people who are finding and saving these animals.”

In many cases, community cats, sometimes called feral cats, were left on their own when their human caregivers evacuated as floodwaters rose. The Alley Cat Allies team will help shelters and caregivers throughout Texas and Louisiana to rebuild programs that were in place to help community cats, including Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR). They will also be forming a network of people to check on colonies, resume feeding them and place new cat houses and shelters as necessary.

The Alley Cat Allies disaster response team is starting its work in Spring, a Houston suburb, by assisting the Texas Litter Control (TLC) organization. TLC requested help as a member of the Alley Cat Allies Feral Friends Network. Alley Cat Allies has brought truckloads of traps, dens and cat carriers, which will all be in high demand. Additional supplies such as leashes, cat food, kitty litter, water, blankets and towels are also being delivered.

In Texas and Louisiana, Alley Cat Allies is offering emergency funds to overwhelmed shelters and organizations. In one such case, the Humane Society of Louisiana (HSLA) has used these funds for two disaster-ready transportation vehicles that are facilitating the rescue of hundreds of animals stranded by floodwaters. Jeff Dorson, executive director of HSLA, thanked Alley Cat Allies for helping in a second consecutive year, after the organization previously responded to extreme flooding in 2016.

“Once more, Alley Cat Allies has come to our aid in a time of need,” Dorson said. “This critical support is helping us to save cats and other animals who need our help. The generosity, partnership and good-will are helping us to get through some very challenging days as we try to do as much good as we can.”

Alley Cat Allies will post updates about its hurricane relief efforts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, and donations to support its work can be made online at www.alleycat.org.

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About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the global engine of change for cats. We protect and improve cats’ lives through our innovative, cutting-edge programs. We are seen around the world as a champion for the humane treatment of all cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 650,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens worldwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

Hurricane Preparation Tips for Pet Owners, Cat Caregivers in Path of Irma

BETHESDA, Md. – Sept. 6, 2017 – As Hurricane Irma approaches Florida and the Southeastern United States, Alley Cat Allies, the international advocacy organization dedicated to protecting cats, has assembled a set of Disaster Preparation Tips for community cat caregivers, pet owners, and others involved with animals. These tips will help community cat caregivers and pet owners in the path of Irma weather the storm and keep their cats safe. Among the tips:

  1. Make sure to have descriptions of your pets and the community cats (sometimes called feral cats) you care for, along with photos. If you need to look for displaced cats in shelters or other rescue areas, this will help accurately identify them. Make sure all pet tags and animal microchips have up-to-date information.
  2. Enlist a back-up caregiver who is responsible for the community cats in your absence, and network with other community cat caregivers in your area to set up a ‘buddy system.’ This will create a safety net of care for the cats. You may be able to find other cat caregivers in your area through our Feral Friends Network.
  3. Create an emergency contact card for your pets and community cat colonies in case you are not immediately available. Include all contact information for your substitute caregiver. Carry this card in your wallet and your car, give copies to your backup caregiver, and post it somewhere visible in your home like on the refrigerator.
  4. Make a list of local shelters and their contact information. You will need this information in case you need their help or resources.
  5. Keep an emergency supply kit on hand and know where to find it quickly. Disaster kit basics for pets include a pet first-aid kit, a supply of prescription medications for pets, veterinary and microchip ID records, three to seven days of pet food and dishes, a seven-day supply of bottled water per person and per pet, a litter box and litter, a leash and collar, crate or carrier, blankets, and photos of pets and cats in colonies.

It’s not possible to bring community cats with you when evacuating from disasters, so they need their own special disaster plan. Read our Disaster Proofing a Community Cat Colony resource for guidance.

Finally, you can always reach out to Feral Friends Network members in your area for help in preparing community cats for a disaster or finding them after the danger has passed.

With an active Atlantic hurricane season now under way, it’s important to have a disaster readiness plan in place.  

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Talkin' Pets News

September 2, 2017

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Suzanne Topor - Livingston Animal & Avian Hospital

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guest - Dr. Brian Beale of Nat Geo Wild's Animal ER will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/02/17 at 5pm EST to discuss his 2nd year of following extreme veterinary cases on Nat Geo Wild

 

Raleigh, NC – Our hearts and prayers go out to the many people in Texas, Louisiana and surrounding areas that are in the path of Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath. The magnitude of the devastation from this storm is unimaginable and the American Kennel Club® (AKC®) and AKC Reunite are here to contribute to the relief. Two AKC Pet Disaster Relief trailers have been deployed in Dallas and Ft Worth, Texas to help evacuees from the storm and AKC Reunite will continue to help shelters caring for pets displaced by the storm.

“AKC Reunite continues to monitor the situation in Texas and Louisiana. We are committed to providing as much assistance as possible to those affected by this storm,” said Tom Sharp, AKC Reunite President and CEO. “Pets are part of the family and we understand how important it is to ensure their safety as well.” 

The Fort Worth AKC Pet Disaster Relief trailer has been deployed at the Fort Worth Wilkerson Facility emergency shelter, located at 5201 Ca Roberson Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76119. The deployment of this trailer allows people to safely evacuate with their pets instead of risking their lives because they do not have a safe, pet-friendly place to go. It houses supplies that create a safe, temporary home-base for at least 65 pets in the wake of a disaster. The essential, non-perishable AKC Pet Disaster Relief supplies are crucial, as many pet owners do not have the time to gather the necessary items to care for their pets during an emergency evacuation.

The Tri Cities/Cedar Hill AKC Pet Disaster Relief Trailer is deployed adjacent to the “Mega” Shelter set up in Dallas at the Kay Bailey Hutchinson Convention Center. This self-care animal shelter set up in the nearby parking garage so evacuees have close proximity to their pets. Efforts are being supported by the SPCA of Texas, the Dallas Animals Services, and the Dallas County Animal Response Team.

AKC Reunite has donated thousands of dollars to Austin Pets Alive shelter, Etosha Rescue, the SPCA of Brazoria County, among others. The organization has also purchased $2,600 worth of kennel runs for the Tri-Cities Animal Shelter and Dallas County Response Team to assist at the Dallas Mega Shelter.

Please refer to the AKC Reunite website for more updates on the storm and what the AKC and AKC Reunite are doing to contribute to the relief. You can also find pet-friendly emergency shelter locations, including those with AKC Pet Disaster Relief trailers. To donate to AKC Reunite, please click here.

VETERINARIANS JUGGLE FAMILY, ANIMALS AND BUSINESS ON ANIMAL PLANET’S THE VET LIFE

 

Tuskegee Alumni and Families Featured in All-New Series Premiering in June

(Animal Planet announced today a new docu-series, THE VET LIFE which introduces three Texas-based veterinarians, Dr. Diarra Blue, Dr. Aubrey Ross and Dr. Michael Lavigne, who run a thriving vet clinic in the greater Houston area. The eight-episode season premieres on Saturday, June 4 at 10:00 p.m. ET/PT.

Equal parts laughter and drama, THE VET LIFE follows veterinarians, Dr. Blue, Dr. Ross and Dr. Lavigne, as they navigate the balancing act of running their newly-opened animal hospital while managing the everyday stress of raising their families alongside their wives. The series captures the doctors’ home life with their spouses, children, parents, in-laws, pets and large group of friends.

The three doctors developed a strong friendship while attending Tuskegee University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and reconvened in Las Vegas where they began their careers and honed their surgery skills. After years of paying their dues, they decided to fulfill their dreams of owning their own practice and set their sights on Dr. Ross’ hometown of Houston. In 2015, Cy-Fair Animal Hospital opened its doors to service the community and their pets. 

The veterinarians are dedicated to providing the best care for their patients – both human and animal. Dr. Blue’s personality keeps them smiling and in good spirits while Dr. Ross keeps the clinic running during an often hectic work day. Dr. Lavigne is a skilled surgeon who provides balance. With a combined experience of over 22 years and a shared love of animals, Dr. Diarra Blue, Dr. Aubrey Ross and Dr. Michael Lavigne thrive to educate the public about the importance of preventative medicine in order to extend the longevity of the human animal bond.

 

TEXAS VETSis produced for Animal Planet by Nancy Glass Productions with Argle Bargle Films. For Nancy Glass Productions, Nancy Glass is the executive producer. For Argle Bargle Films, Jairus Cobb and Shannon Biggs are executive producers. For Animal Planet, Keith Hoffman is executive producer and Sarah Russell is associate producer.

About Animal Planet

Animal Planet, a multi-media business unit of Discovery Communications, is the world's only entertainment brand that immerses viewers in the full range of life in the animal kingdom with rich, deep content via multiple platforms and offers animal lovers and pet owners access to a centralized online, television and mobile community for immersive, engaging, high-quality entertainment, information and enrichment. Animal Planet consists of the Animal Planet television network, available in more than 94 million homes in the US; online assets www.animalplanet.com, the ultimate online destination for all things animal; Animal Planet L!VE, the go-to digital destination for round-the-clock, unfiltered access to the animal kingdom; and other media platforms including a robust Video-on-Demand (VOD) service, and merchandising extensions.

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