Talkin' Pets News

04/15/2017

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jillyn Sidlo

Producer - Daisy Charlotte

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Author Bob Bennett will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 4/15/2017 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away his book "Guide to Raising Rabbits"

Inventor & CEO of ONLY LEASH, Brett Flippen, will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 04/15/2017 at 630pm EST to discuss and give away his Only Leash

Actress Maria Menounos will stop by Talkin' Pets with Jon Patch 4/15/2017 to chat about the first ever upcoming Beverly Hills Dog Show On USA Network April 16, 2017 at 8pm EST

 

A Rabbit Raising Classic Returns

Storey’s Guide to Raising Rabbits, 4th Edition

After 35 years of guiding rabbit fanciers to success, Storey’s Guide to Raising Rabbits has now been revised for a fourth edition. Rabbits are bred and raised for their flavorful, lean meat, wool and fur, as well as for exhibition and pets. The fourth edition addresses all of these goals and includes an expanded section on showing rabbits, from how to get started to how to win the competition. Storey’s Guide to Raising Rabbits is the most comprehensive reference available, revised and updated for everything a novice or veteran rabbit producer needs to know to raise rabbits successfully.

Storey’s Guide to Raising Rabbits will give pet owners, rabbit exhibitors, and commercial raisers alike the knowledge they need to succeed in the industry. The American Rabbit Breeders Association has more than 24,000 members from a variety of backgrounds. People nationwide are catching onto the benefits of raising rabbits for meat, as evidenced by an increasing demand at farmers markets and high-end restaurants. Detailed explanations on feeding, housing, and breeding ensure productive, healthy rabbits, while marketing and sales tips, showing guidelines, family-favorite recipes and more complete this practical guide.

Over 262,000 copies of Storey’s Guide to Raising Rabbits have been sold, while the Storey’s Guide to Raisingseries has sold over 1.7 million copies and is now being completely updated. New editions include Storey’s Guide to Raising Beef Cattle, Rabbits, Sheep, Horses, Pigs, Chickens, and a new addition to the series, Storey’s Guide to Raising Miniature Livestock.  

ABOUT THE AUTHOR                                                                                                                                                                     

Bob Bennett is the author of six books on raising rabbits, as well as numerous magazine and newspaper articles. He has served as editor of Rabbits magazine, contributing editor to Countryside magazine, and founder of Domestic Rabbit magazine, and is past director of the American Rabbit Breeders' Association. He lives in Vermont.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Storey’s Guide to Raising Rabbits, 4th Edition

Bob Bennett

Storey Publishing, November 2009

242 pages; 6" x 9"

One-color; photographs and illustrations throughout

$19.95 paper; ISBN 978-1-60342-456-1

$29.95 hardcover; ISBN 978-1-60342-457-8                      

 

MARCH 2017

This email newsletter contains news, tips and other content that help you learn more about Neutricks, and, if you're a distributor, you can include in your marketing efforts and messaging.

 
 
 

April: A Busy Month for Pet Holidays!

April is a popular time to be a pet or their parents! Take time this month to remind patient families to celebrate or observe the following holidays with their pets:

National Pet Day: April 11th is a great day for all pets!

Easter: We'll be publishing articles in April around Easter and safety tips to remember for your dog or cat. 

National Pet ID Week: Make sure your patients have ID tags and/or microchips to keep them safe and easy to find when they're lost!

Animal Cruelty Awareness Week: Learn the signs and stay informed about animal cruelty in your community.

Be the first to get our new "Spring Guide for Senior Pets" eBook

New Blog & New Store!

March has been a busy month for us! After our trip out to Las Vegas for the annual Western Veterinary Conference, we kicked things into high gear and released an upgraded version of our Senior Pet Wellness Blog and put the finishing touches on and released our new Neutricks Web Store, where we've made it easier for you to buy Neutricks for Dogs and Neutricks for Cats directly from us! 

Cognitive Health Resources for Veterinarians

The Neutricks Vet Portal is an area on the Neutricks website that provides research, marketing materials, a vet directory and other resources for veterinarians to ensure you are have what you need to promote, educate and consult on Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome with your patients.

Visit the Neutricks Vet Portal

  

 

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Thanks for reading!

Neutricks, LLC   466 South Segoe Road    Madison,  Wisconsin   53711   USA

Rabbits at Easter

Jan 10, 2013 by

A smiling child in an adorable outfit clutches a cute baby bunny in her arms. What’s wrong with this picture? Contrary to Eastertime hype, rabbits and small children are not a good match. The natural exuberance, rambunctiousness and decibel-level of even the gentlest toddler are stressful for the sensitive rabbit. It is the rare child who will enjoy and appreciate the rabbit’s subtle and sensitive nature.

Another misconception is that rabbits are passive and cuddly. They are ground-loving creatures who feel frightened and insecure when held and restrained. Children like a companion they can hold, carry, and cuddle, just as they do their favorite stuffed animal. It is unreasonable to expect a child to be able to take full responsibility for the care of a rabbit, or to make a 10-year commitment to anything! All too often, the child loses interest, and the rabbit ends up neglected or abandoned.

Some people think rabbits are a “low-maintenance” pet. In fact, they require almost as much work as a dog. They must be housetrained. The house must be bunny-proofed, or Thumper will chew electrical cords, rugs, books, and furniture. They must be spayed or neutered, or they will mark your house with feces and urine. They must live indoors, as members of the family. Rabbits kept in hutches outdoors have an average lifespan of about one year; house rabbits can live 8 to 10 years. Predators abound, not only in rural areas but in urban and suburban locations as well. Outdoor rabbits become bored and depressed from isolation. To consign these sensitive, intelligent, social animals to life in a hutch is to miss all the joy of sharing your life with a rabbit. Unless he’s part of your daily routine, you will not have the opportunity to really get to know his subtle personality.

Clearly, rabbits are not for everyone! Are you a gentle adult who lives in a quiet household? Are you eager to get to know rabbits on their own terms – to spend time down at their level, on the floor; to allow the rabbit to initiate gestures of friendship and trust? If you think you are one of those rare individuals who would enjoy sharing life with a rabbit, please visit your local animal shelter or rabbit-rescue group. As rabbits have increased in popularity, they are suffering the same fate as our other companion animals – abandonment. You can also check your local veterinary clinic and “Pets” classifieds of your newspaper. It’s a sad fact that no matter where you live, you are within 10 miles of a rabbit who needs a home. The effort made to find that special bunny means you are saving a life.

So if little Susie is pleading for a bunny for Easter, do a rabbit a favor, and buy her a toy rabbit that she can snuggle to her heart’s content. Let’s make Easter a joyful time for our long-eared friends.

(Washington, D.C., March 27, 2013) American Bird Conservancy, bowing to a tidal wave of public opinion, has declared the Peep (Marshmallicious delicious) to be this year’s Easter bird of the week, and has further announced it is to be split into four bird species. The reselection of 2011’s choice was based on popular opinion. “I couldn’t fight it any longer. The time has come – it was a no brainer for me,” ABC President George Fenwick said.

Up until now, scientists have recognized only the familiar “yellow” form of peep as a full species; but there is currently support in the ornithological community for granting separate species status to the blue, teal, pink, and purple forms, currently considered color morphs. “There simply isn’t any evidence that these forms interbreed,” said ABC senior scientist Dr. David Wiedenfeld. “While they can often be found roosting in the same box, the fact is that nobody has ever seen an intermediate bird between the color morphs,” he added.The presence of occasional orange and other colored birds in the population may represent occasional aberrant individuals, but any new taxonomic changes will require further study.”

In naming the Peep as Bird of The Week for a second time, ABC also raised eyebrows again. “We’ve never had a repeat Bird of the Week. That was a tough decision and I know some will disagree but if the Grammy Awards and Saturday Night Live can have repeat hosts, we thought we could break tradition as well. Some will point out that Bird of the Week is a bigger deal and needs to stand firm on tradition, but I say the Peep has been a real giver and it’s time for us to give back and return the favors from decades of springtime giving. It’s just the right thing to do.”

Peeps typically make their appearance in the springtime, with numbers peaking in April. Despite their ubiquitous distribution and social nature, their migratory paths, wintering, and breeding areas are little known.

During their breeding season, Peeps can easily be found in suburban backyard habitats, where they lay clutches of colorful eggs in nests of brightly-colored plastic grasses. Adult and immature peeps can be quickly located by their sweet calls and neon plumage.

Although Peeps are heavily consumed, their populations appear to quickly rebound in subsequent years and therefore they are not a species of conservation concern. Enjoy this popular harbinger of spring!

Asked about the possibility of a three-peat, Fenwick was noncommittal: “Well, we’ve never shied away from controversy. Naming the Peep Bird of the Week in 2011 caused quite an uproar – almost crashed our website. This decision will probably cause another firestorm – I probably won’t answer my phone for a week. But who knows, anything is possible. We’ll take the pulse when the next time comes.”

See ABC's Bird of the Week profile for this species!

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American Bird Conservancy (ABC) is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit membership organization whose mission is to conserve native birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. ABC acts by safeguarding the rarest species, conserving and restoring habitats, and reducing threats, while building capacity in the bird conservation movement.