Talkin' Pets News

July 6, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Maria Ryan, DogGone Positive, Port St. Lucie, FL  & new to the show Jasmine Johnson, Jasmine the Dog Trainer, Tampa Bay, FL

Producer - Lexi Lapp - Happy Birthday & Congrats on her Engagement

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media / Production - Bob Page

Special Guests - Frank Hyman author of Hentopia will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 7/06/19 at 5pm ET to discuss and give away his book

Jerry Grymek - Doggie Concierge Hotel Penn 7/06/19 at 630pm ET

 

Talkin' Pets News

September 1, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jay Stutz - Animal Plabet - Good Dog U

Producer - Daisey Charlotte

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer / Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guest - Jennifer Skiff, Author of "Rescuing Ladybugs" will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/01/18 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away her new book

Talkin' Pets News

April 7, 2018

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Jarrod Lazarus

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Reporter - Georgia Malpartida

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Author of "My Patients and Other Animals", Suzy Fincham-Gray will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 04/07/18 at 5pm ESTto discuss and give away her new book

Christian Savalas son of Kojak Star Telly Savalas will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 4/7/18 at 630pm ET to discuss his new mobale game, Wild Weiner

Delivery Scanning Technology Linked to Decrease from 2016

April 05, 2018 


http://www.facebook.com/uspsspacerTwitter @USPS

"Any dog can bite" poster

SAN DIEGO — The number of postal employees attacked by dogs nationwide reached 6,244 in 2017 — more than 500 fewer than 2016. Today, the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is showcasing technology that alerts mail carriers of potential attacks while releasing its annual list of cities where the most dog attacks were recorded. The organization also highlights safety initiatives to help protect its employees and offers tips to pet owners.

“We’re encouraged by the decrease in dog attacks,” said U.S. Postal Service Safety Director Linda DeCarlo in San Diego, where postal employees suffered 46 attacks — the fifth ranked city in 2017. “The totals are still too high, but we’re confident that with continuing education and dog bite prevention training, along with advancing technology, we can keep more people safe and keep attacks trending downward.”

Enhancing Employee Safety
DeCarlo highlights USPS safety measures that alert mail carriers to dogs on their delivery routes. The Package Pickup application on usps.com asks customers to indicate if there are dogs at their addresses when they schedule package pickups. This information is provided to carriers on their delivery scanners which send alerts if an unleashed dog is reported in a delivery area.

“The scanners that our carriers use to confirm a customer’s delivery include a feature for them to indicate the presence of a dog at an individual address,” said DeCarlo. “This information is particularly helpful for substitute carriers who fill in for regular carriers on their days off.”

 information provided to carriers on delivery scanner

DeCarlo is in San Diego Thursday, April 5, to kick off National Dog Bite Prevention Week, which runs Sunday, April 8, through Saturday, April 14. The Postal Service, joined by the American Humane, American Veterinary Medical Association, Insurance Information Institute and State Farm Insurance, is driving home the message that dog bites are a national issue and education can resolve the issue.

Half of the 4.5 million Americans bitten by dogs annually are children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

DeCarlo gave the following tips and encouraged sharing them using the hashtag #preventdogbites. A video on dog bite prevention tips is available on the Postal Service’s YouTube channel.

  • If a carrier delivers mail or packages to your front door, place your dog in a separate room and close that door before opening the front door. Some dogs burst through screen doors or plate-glass windows to attack visitors. Dog owners should keep the family pet secured.
  • Parents should remind their children and other family members not to take mail directly from carriers in the presence of the family pet, as the dog may view the person handing mail to a family member as a threatening gesture.
  • The Postal Service places the safety of its employees as a top priority. If a carrier feels threatened by a dog, or if a dog is loose or unleashed, the owner may be asked to pick up mail at a Post Office until the carrier is assured the pet has been restrained. If a dog is roaming the neighborhood, the pet owner’s neighbors also may be asked to pick up their mail at the area’s Post Office.

American Humane, the country’s first national humane organization, estimates that more than 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year with 800,000 seeking medical attention for these bites — more than half of them being children.

“Two-thirds of the injuries occurring in children four years or younger are to the head or neck region, and studies have also shown that the greatest percentage of dog-bite fatalities occurred among children and unsupervised newborns left with dogs — something that should never occur,” said Mark Stubis, chief communications officer, American Humane.  “To help, American Humane offers a free online booklet, ‘Pet Meets Baby,’ with valuable information on introducing a new child to a home with a pet — or a new pet into a home with a child available for families with children.”

Insurance company State Farm reports that in 2017, it paid more than $132 million as a result of 3,618 dog-related injury claims. The average cost paid per claim was $36,573. “State Farm is also one of the few insurance companies that does not exclude homeowner or renter insurance coverage because of the breed of dog owned,” said Heather Paul, State Farm public affairs specialist. “The company reinforces that responsible pet ownership and educating children about how to safely interact with dogs is key to reducing dog bites.”

“Veterinarians see firsthand the needless heartbreak a dog bite can cause,” said Dr. Mike Topper, AVMA President. “We know that dog bites are not a breed-specific issue and that any dog can bite. We also know that most bites can be prevented through education. Your veterinarian and the AVMA have extensive resources designed to keep your pup, no matter what their breed, a happy, healthy member of your family and community.

2017 Dog Attack Rankings by City
A total of 6,244 postal employees were attacked by dogs in 2017. The top 30 city rankings are below. Some cities share the same rankings as they experienced the same number of attacks.

 

Office City

Office State

CY-17

CY-16

1  

HOUSTON

TX

71

62

2  

LOS ANGELES

CA

67

80

3  

ST LOUIS

MO

52

31

4  

CLEVELAND

OH

49

60

5  

SAN DIEGO

CA

46

57

6  

BALTIMORE

MD

44

36

6  

SAN ANTONIO

TX

44

42

7  

COLUMBUS

OH

43

39

8  

DALLAS

TX

40

41

9  

LOUISVILLE

KY

39

51

10 

CHICAGO

IL

38

46

11 

DENVER

CO

35

47

12 

LONG BEACH

CA

32

22

12 

DETROIT

MI

32

48

12 

KANSAS CITY

MO

32

30

13 

OAKLAND

CA

28

23

13 

SEATTLE

WA

28

31

14 

MINNEAPOLIS

MN

27

43

14 

CHARLOTTE

NC

27

33

14 

PHILADELPHIA

PA

27

40

15 

SAN JOSE

CA

26

21

15 

FORT WORTH

TX

26

33

16 

MIAMI

FL

25

15

16 

INDIANAPOLIS

IN

25

44

16 

ROCHESTER

NY

25

11

16 

CINCINNATI

OH

25

24

16 

TOLEDO

OH

25

18

17 

PHOENIX

AZ

24

35

17 

SACRAMENTO

CA

24

30

17 

PORTLAND

OR

24

41

The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.

# # #

For National Dog Bite Prevention Week® (April 8 -14),
American Humane Offers Tips to Stay Safe All Year Round

 
 
 

WASHINGTON, April 5, 2018 – Every year more than 4.5 million Americans, more than half of them children, are bitten by dogs.  As part of the National Dog Bite Prevention Week® coalition, American Humane, the country’s first national humane organization, encourages adults to protect both children and dogs, and learn the importance of pet owner responsibility.

            “Dogs are our best friends, providing love, comfort and protection,” says Dr. Robin Ganzert, president and CEO of American Humane. “But it’s up to us humans to be good friends to them as well by protecting everyone around us – ourselves, our kids, and our dogs – from the dangers and consequences of dog bites.”

Dogs can bite for many reasons, including improper care and/or a lack of socialization.  All dogs, even well-trained, gentle dogs, are capable of biting however when provoked, especially when eating, sleeping or caring for puppies. Thus, even when a bite is superficial or classified as “provoked,” dogs may be abandoned or euthanized. Therefore, it’s vitally important to keep both children and dogs safe by preventing dog bites wherever possible.

         ��  “A dog bite can have a profound effect not only on the victim, but on the dog, who may be euthanized, and the dog’s owners who have to cope with the loss of a beloved family member,” said Dr. Kwane Stewart, Chief Veterinary Officer for American Humane’s “No Animals Were Harmed®” program, speaking at the National Dog Bite Prevention Week Coalition kick-off event in San Diego on April 5. “All those who have a canine companion need to make sure they know the steps they can take to prevent their dog from biting someone.”

            To reduce the number of injuries to people and the risk of relinquishment of dogs who bite, American Humane offers the following suggestions:

For Children:

  • Never approach an unknown dog or a dog that is alone without an owner, and always ask for permission before petting the dog.
  • Never approach an injured animal – find an adult who can get the help s/he needs
  • Never approach a dog that is eating, sleeping or nursing puppies.
  • Don’t poke, hit, pull, pinch or tease a dog.

For Dog Owners:

  • Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog, even if it is a family pet.
  • Interactions between children and dogs should always be monitored to ensure the safety of both your child and your dog.
  • Teach your children to treat the dog with respect and not to engage in rough or aggressive play.
  • Make sure your pet is socialized as a young puppy so it feels at ease around people and other animals.
  • Never put your dog in a position where s/he feels threatened.
  • Walk and exercise your dog regularly to keep him/her healthy and to provide mental stimulation.
  • Use a leash in public to ensure you are able to control your dog.
  • Regular veterinary care is essential to maintain your dog’s health; a sick or injured dog is more likely to bite.
  • Be alert, if someone approaches you and your dog - caution them to wait before petting the dog, give your pet time to be comfortable with a stranger.

American Humane also offers a free online booklet available for families with children called “Pet Meets Baby,” providing valuable information on introducing a new child to a home with a pet – or a new pet into a home with a child: http://www.americanhumane.org/interaction/programs/humane-education/pet-meets-baby.html.

Consider these statistics and tips provided by National Dog Bite Prevention Week® Coalition members:

 

 
About American Humane
American Humane is the country’s first national humane organization, founded in 1877. For more information, please visit www.americanhumane.org today. 

Steve Brooks is one of LA’s most sought-after celebrity dog trainers, the founder of SteveBrooksK9U, and author of the book “Dog Bites with Steve Brooks.”  Steve has been training dogs for over 20 years using force-free based solutions.  He is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer, a Canine Behavioral Expert and licensed presenter of Family Paws and Parent Education. 

 

Beginning February 12, visit Steve at the Doggie Spa Vendors area at the Hotel Pennsylvania for his “Dog Bites” cooking demonstration and training tips he’s used on Hollywood’s A-list canines! See Steve that night at the NY Pet Fashion Show where he will be judging and signing copies of his new book.

 

More information: www.SteveBrooksK9U.com

DOG BITES with Steve Brooks

The Perfect Book for Foodies & Dog Lovers!

Steve Brooks, Celebrity Dog Trainer and founder of SteveBrooksK9U, shares secrets to modifying canine behavior without the use of threats or force. Discover how to train your dog using gourmet, healthy dog bites as rewards for good behavior!

Steve Brooks (CPDT/KA) is a master of creative, positive, science-based reward training methods with terrific results and has been training dogs for over 20 years using “dog bites” to correctly train thousands of dogs with lasting results.

DOG BITES with Steve Brooks uses food as an effective training tool. In this book, you will discover what is safe and unsafe to feed your dog while learning how to modify your favorite meals to share with your pup! While Steve cooks recipes from Organic Turkey Meatballs, Sweet Pup-Tato Fries to Chicken Pup-Pie, he shares what is safe and delicious for canine consumption. He also demonstrates the health benefits and dangers of many human foods.

  • Discover how to modify K9 behavior with Steve’s Positive Training Tactics

  • Learn how to use food (and other rewards) to correctly train your dog

  • Teach your dog to: walk without pulling on the leash, come, stay, tricks…and more!

  • Reduce fear, food-guarding and aggression issues

  • Know which foods are safe and unsafe; foods that can heal or harm your dog

  • Train your dog to take food gently right out of your hand!

Steve Brooks is a world-renowned Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT/KA), a credential granted by the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers (CCPDT). He is a Canine Behavioral Expert and professional member of the APDT, Association of Pet Dog Trainers. He is a licensed presenter of Family Paws Parent Education, Dog & Baby Connection, Dog & Storks, and a proud member of Pet Professional Guild where he promotes force free training

Steve founded SteveBrooksK9U (www.SteveBrooksK9U.com) in Los Angeles in 1999. Since then, he’s been one of LA’s most sought-after dog trainers. Thousands of dogs have graduated from K9U. Steve’s clients include Hollywood celebrities such as: Sheryl Crow, Robert Downey Jr, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Lori Alan, Kristen Bell, Dax Shepard, William Fichtner, Cheryl Tiegs, Dennis Dugan, William Peterson, Rick Rubin, members of the bands Chicago, and Earth Wind and Fire to name a few, as well as, thousands of everyday dog lovers.

DOG BITES with Steve Brooks is available now on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, most online bookstores and at www.SteveBrooksK9U.com

MEDIA APPEARANCES

Steve’s talents have garnered him media exposure in both national and international markets.  He has appeared regularly as the dog expert on training and safety for Fox News in both San Diego and Los Angeles and NBC news in Palm Springs. In 2009, Steve was featured as the dog training expert in Marley & Me (Blu-Ray DVD). He has appeared in programs such as Animal Planet, National Geographic Channel, as well as, appearing on CBS’ “World’s Funniest Pets”,TBS’ “Ripley’s Believe It Or Not” and the nationally syndicated newsmagazine Inside Edition. Steve was the trainer of Presley, the rescue Boxer and winner of “The Greatest American Dog.” Many international broadcasters in Japan, Canada and Australia have also profiled Steve and his work as a professional trainer. Steve has been featured on a multitude of radio shows such as Pet World Insider and KPCC 89.3 Public Radio. He is a regular contributor to numerous publications and an ongoing writer for Fido Friendly magazine.

DISCUSSION TOPICS WITH STEVE BROOKS

A Feast For Fido - Sharing Holiday Meals With Your Dog - Creative, safe and healthy meals you can share with your dog during the holidays.

Keeping Your Home Safe For Your Dog - Ways you can ensure your home is safe for the new Christmas puppy. How to avoid dangers that may be lurking in your home that could endanger your dog.

Holistic Help For Your Dog - Natural ways to care for your dog to enhance good health.

No Kibble Needed - Throw together a healthy meal for your dog with ingredients right from your refrigerator.

Feeding Fido On the Go - On the road with no kibble, Steve shares surprising healthy fast food options you can feed your dog.

Holiday Manners For Your Pup - Quick tips to keep your pup "party polite."

PUP-tality! – What you can do NOW to help your dog live a longer life with vitality!

Superfoods For Your Dog – Turn your dog’s diet from good to great with superfoods!

First Aid For Your Dog – Learn how to handle emergencies, such as poisonous foods and choking, with techniques that could save your dog’s life.

Fido Fitness – Exercise tips for your dog at every age!

 

 

 

 

Collaboration Promotes National Dog Bite Prevention Week, May 19-25

WASHINGTON — As a prelude to National Dog Bite Prevention Week, the Postal Service released its dog attack city rankings today and urged pet owners to help reduce the incidence of dog bites to letter carriers.

“If our letter carriers deem your loose dog to be a threat, you’ll be asked to pick up your mail at the Post Office until it’s safe to deliver,” said Ken Snavely, acting postmaster of Los Angeles, where 69 postal employees were attacked last year, placing the City of Angels as the most vicious for dog attacks. Nationwide, 5,879 postal employees were attacked.

Snavely noted that in situations where a dog roams the neighborhood, delivery to the owner’s neighbors could be curtailed as well. Additionally, when letter carriers come to a customer’s door, pet owners are asked to place dogs in a separate room and close the door, as many canines have been known to jump through screen and glass doors.

Dog attacks are a nationwide issue and not just a postal problem. Nearly 5,900 letter carriers were attacked last year, but that pales in comparison to the 4.7 million Americans annually bitten by dogs — more than half of whom are children — according to theCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The U.S. Postal Service, the medical community, veterinarians and the insurance industry are working together to educate the public that dog bites are avoidable by declaring May 19-25 as National Dog Bite Prevention Week.

“Many dogs are cherished members of their family and people believe their dog won’t bite, but given the right circumstances, any dog can attack," said Snavely. “Dogs do not reason like people do and they will react to their instinct to protect their family and territory. Working with animal behavior experts, the Postal Service has developed tips to avoid dog attacks, and for dog owners, tips for practicing responsible pet ownership.”

How to be a Responsible Dog Owner

  • Obedience training can teach dogs proper behavior and help owners control their dogs in any situation.
  • Dogs can be protective of their territory and may interpret the actions of a letter carrier as a threat. Please take precautions when accepting mail in the presence of your pet.
  • When a letter carrier comes to your home, keep your dog inside, away from the door, in another room or on a leash.
  • Dogs that haven’t been properly socialized, receive little attention or handling, or are left tied up for long periods of time frequently turn into biters.

Fiscal Year 2012 U.S. Postal Service Dog Attack City Ranking

Ranking

City, State

Attacks

1

Los Angeles, CA

69

2

San Antonio, TX and Seattle, WA

42

3

Chicago, IL

41

4

San Francisco, CA

38

5

Philadelphia, PA

34

6

Detroit, MI

33

7

St. Louis, MO

32

8

Baltimore, MD and Sacramento, CA

29

9

Houston, TX and Minneapolis, MN

27

10

Cleveland and Dayton, OH

26

11

Buffalo and Brooklyn, NY

24

12

Denver, CO

23

13

Dallas, TX and Tacoma, WA

21

14

Wichita, KS

20

The National Dog Bite Prevention Week partners offer the following tips:

Avoiding Attacks

  • Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog.
  • Don’t run past a dog. The dog’s natural instinct is to chase and catch you.
  • If a dog threatens you, don’t scream. Avoid eye contact. Try to remain motionless until the dog leaves, then back away slowly until the dog is out of sight.
  • Never approach a strange dog, especially one that’s tethered or confined.
  • Don’t disturb a dog that is sleeping, eating or caring for puppies.
  • Anyone wanting to pet a dog should first obtain permission from the owner.
  • Always let a dog see and sniff you before petting the animal.
  • If you believe a dog is about to attack you, try to place something between yourself and the dog, such as a backpack or a bicycle.
  • If you are knocked down by a dog, curl into a ball and protect your face with your hands.

The Postal Service; the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP),aap.org; the American Humane Association (AHA) americanhumane.org, the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery (ASRM), microsurg.org;the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA),avma.org;the Insurance Information Institute (III),iii.org; State Farm Insurance,statefarm.com; and Prevent The Bite (PTB),preventthebite.org, are driving home the message that dog bites are a nationwide issue and that education can help prevent dog attacks to people of all ages.

American Academy of Pediatricians

“Parents, please don’t ever leave a young child unsupervised around any dog, even a dog well-known to your family,” said AAP President Dr. Robert Block. “Even very young children should be taught not to tease or hurt animals. And with school almost over for the year, children will be spending more time in parks, at friends’ homes, and other places where they may encounter dogs.

American Humane Association

Children should be taught to never approach an unfamiliar dog. Infants and young children should never be left alone with any dog; interactions between children and dogs should always be monitored to ensure safety for both the dog and the child. Children should be taught to treat the dog with respect and not engage in rough or aggressive play. American Humane Association has a brochure“Pet Meets Baby”, available for families with infants, that is available online americanhumane.org/assets/pdfs/interaction/pet-meets-baby-2013.pdf and offers many helpful tips.

American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery

“Most children love dogs and like to put their face up close to the dog’s face. Parents should never permit this,” said Dr. Joseph Serletti, president of the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery. “Even the friendliest dog may bite when startled or surprised. Be cautious, once a child is scarred they are scarred for life. We hear this line all the time ‘The dog has never bitten anyone before’. A dog’s reaction to being surprised or angered is not predictable.”

American Veterinary Medical Association

Any dog can bite. Protect your family and community and the welfare of dogs with early education programs. The Blue Dog Parent Guide and CD is targeted and tested for children from 3 to 6 years old and is intended as a tool to be incorporated as part of a more comprehensive prevention program. Visitavma.org/dogbite for information on dog bite prevention material from the AVMA and its National Dog Bite Prevention Week partners.

Insurance Information Institute

Dog bites account for more than a third of all homeowners’ insurance liability claims, according to the Insurance Information Institute (III). Homeowners and renters insurance policies typically cover dog bite liability if your dog injures another person or damages someone else’s property. The best way to protect yourself is to prevent your dog from biting anyone in the first place.

Prevent The Bite

A nonprofit organization devoted to keeping children safe fromdog bites, Prevent The Bitemeets the national standards of education, and makes it possible for anyone to teach children how to avoid being bitten. Dog attack victim Kelly Voigt is available for interviews.

State Farm Insurance

As the nation’s largest property and casualty insurer in the country, State Farm understands the damage that a dog bite can do. In 2012, the company paid more than $136 million dollars as a result of nearly 4,500 dog bite claims. There are good dogs and bad dogs within every breed, just as there can be responsible and irresponsible owners. State Farm does not refuse insurance based on the breed of dog a customer owns in the United States. Instead, we urge owners to be responsible with their pets. Visitlearningcenter.statefarm.com/ for information on keeping your family and pets safe.

The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.

# # #

34 Texas dog bite fatalities were recorded during this period; more than any other state. Pit bulls were responsible for 76% of the total recorded deaths. Impediments to reduce these deaths include the One Bite rule and the 1991 statewide measure that prohibits breed-specific laws.

Austin, TX, March 20, 2013 --(PR.com)-- DogsBite.org, a national dog bite victims' group dedicated to reducing serious dog attacks, releases a report of Texas dog bite fatalities from January 1, 2005 to February 17, 2013. During this period, 34 Texans suffered death due to a dog mauling, making Texas the leading state in the nation for dog bite-related fatalities. Pit bulls inflicted 76% (26) of these deaths, followed by the next most lethal dog breed, rottweilers, inflicting 15% (5).

DogsBite.org began reviewing Texas dog bite fatality data after a second Texas toddler was killed by a chained pit bull in under a 1-month period this year. Last year in the U.S., chained dogs killed two individuals. In the first 47 days of 2013, Texas matched this national statistic. Of the 6 total chaining deaths in Texas, pit bulls and rottweilers accounted for 100%. Each chaining fatality involved a child 4-years old or younger and occurred in a rural or semi-rural area of Texas.

Victim data from the Texas report showed that 68% (23) of the victims were children ages 11-years and younger. Of this group, 52% (12) were ages 2 and younger. Dog ownership data from the Texas report showed that family dogs comprised 53% (18) of all attacks that ended in human death and 88% (30) of the attacks occurred on the dog owner's property. The combined years of 2006 and 2007 accounted for 38% (13) of all Texas dog bite fatalities during the period.

Texas counties with the most fatal dog attack occurrences include: Harris County (5) followed by Bexar County (4) and Montgomery County (3).

The Texas report also highlights the need to reform Texas laws and the two main impediments to achieving this reform: The One Bite rule, which omits civil liability for the dog's first bite (or first mauling, maiming or death) and the 1991 statewide anti-BSL measure, which prohibits breed-specific laws. The Texas report emphasizes the 1988 and 2011 medical injury studies from Texas doctors; both medical studies explicitly focus on injuries and deaths inflicted by pit bulls.

The report names several progressive Texas cities -- Fort Worth, Garland and San Antonio -- that have implemented proactive animal control policies despite state imposed limitations that deny municipalities from directly targeting the two most lethal dog breeds in Texas. The report briefly outlines each policy and offers links to related FAQs and municipal code. All three policies share two key provisions: preventing new attacks and holding dog owners more responsible.

Please click the below link to see the full Texas report:
Report: Texas Dog Bite Fatalities, January 1, 2005 to February 17, 2013

About DogsBite.org

DogsBite.org is a national dog bite victims' group dedicated to reducing serious dog attacks. Through our work, we hope to protect both people and pets from future attacks. Our website, www.dogsbite.org, was launched in October 2007 and contains a wide collection of data to help policymakers and citizens learn about dangerous dogs. Our research focuses on pit bull type dogs. Due to selective breeding practices that emphasize aggression and tenacity, this class of dogs negatively impacts communities the most. Our website hosts important dog bite studies, U.S. dog bite fatalities and other key bibliographies. In the Legislating Dogs portion of our site, we offer examples of breed-specific laws (state-by-state) and documentation of the constitutionality of these laws. The Victim Realities section provides a glance into the unforgettable stories victims leave behind and much more. DogsBite.org operates out of Austin, Texas and can be contacted via: 512-650-8510 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Research contributions and active website participation stems from individuals that span the United States of America and across the world.

Collaboration promotes National Dog Bite Prevention Week®

SCHAUMBURG, Illinois (May 18, 2012) – Of the 4.7 million Americans victimized annually by dog bites, more than half are children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Veterinarians, the U.S. Postal Service, the medical community and the insurance industry are working together to educate the public that dog bites are preventable.

As part of this effort, the Postal Service is releasing its top 25 dog-attack city rankings to postal employees to kick off National Dog Bite Prevention Week®, May 20-26. The annual event provides dog-attack prevention tips, information on responsible pet ownership and medical treatments tips if attacked.

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), the Postal Service, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery, the Insurance Information Institute and Prevent the Bite are driving home the message that dog bites are a nationwide issue and that education can help prevent dog bites to people of all ages.

“Children between the ages of five and nine years old, engaged in everyday activities with their own or a neighbor’s dog, are the most frequent victims of dog bites,” said AVMA President Dr. René Carlson. “We all want to protect our children from dog bites, and one of the best ways to do that is by properly training and socializing our dogs.”

The AVMA offers the following tips:

How to Avoid Being Bitten

· Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog.

· Don’t run past a dog. The dog’s natural instinct is to chase and catch you.

· If a dog threatens you, don’t scream. Avoid eye contact. Try to remain motionless until the dog leaves, then back away slowly until the dog is out of sight.

· Don’t approach a strange dog, especially one that’s tethered or confined.

· Don’t bother a dog that is sleeping, eating or caring for puppies.

· People choosing to pet dogs should obtain permission from the owner first and always let a dog see and sniff them before petting the animal.

· If you believe a dog is about to attack you, try to place something between yourself and the dog, such as a backpack or a bicycle.

· If you are knocked down by a dog, curl into a ball and protect your face with your hands.

How to be a Responsible Dog Owner

  • Obedience training can teach dogs proper behavior and help owners control their dogs.
  • When letter carriers and others who are not familiar with your dog come to your home, keep your dog inside, away from the door in another room.
  • Dogs can be protective of their territory and may interpret the actions of others as a threat.
  • Spay or neuter your dog. Neutered dogs are less likely to roam and to bite.
  • Dogs that receive little attention or handling, or are left tied up for long periods of time, frequently turn into biters.

“Given the right circumstances, any dog can bite,” said Dr. Carlson. “By acting responsibly, owners not only reduce dog bite injuries, but also enhance the relationship they have with their dog.”

Watch the AVMA video for tips on dog bite prevention or download the following AVMA resources to learn more:

What you should know about dog bite prevention brochure
Tips on how to avoid being bitten, as well as what to do if you are bitten by a dog. The brochure also addresses what you need to do if your dog bites someone.

NEW: Backgrounder: The role of breed in dog bite risk and prevention
This backgrounder reviews and provides scientific context on dog breeds and their purported tendencies to bite.

A community approach to dog bite prevention (PDF)
The American Veterinary Medical Association Task Force on Canine Aggression and Human-Canine Interactions has produced this report intended to help state and local leaders develop effective dog bite prevention programs in their communities.

The Blue Dog Parent Guide and CD
This innovative dog-bite prevention program is designed to help parents and children safely interact with dogs both inside and outside their home.
The program is geared toward children from 3 to 6 years old. It's the only dog-bite educational tool scientifically proven to help young children learn behaviors that can keep them safe.

Bilingual Dog Bite Prevention activity/coloring book
Teach children about different ways to avoid dog bites, by educating them on how, or if, they should approach a dog.

For more information, please visit, www.avma.org.

###