Talkin' Pets News

February 2, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Maria Ryan - DogGone Positive

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Social Media / Production - Bob Page

Special Guests - 5pm ET Bash Dibra Celebrity Dog Trainer // 630pm ET Jerry Grymek Doggie Concierge Hotel Penn

WINN FELINE FOUNDATION AND THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF FELINE PRACTIONERS
ANNOUNCE 2018 JOINT SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS
 
Awards support the success of veterinary students who focus on feline clinical practice and research science that are vital to the future of feline medicine and welfare.
 
 
[Wyckoff, NJ; Hillsborough, NJ; May 24, 2018] Winn Feline Foundation (Winn) and the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) are proud to announce the two recipients of the 2018 joint scholarships for clinical practice and clinical research scientist.
 
Both recipients show exceptional promise: Nicole Rowbothan, a junior at Mississippi State University, was awarded the clinical practice scholarship; Courtney Meason-Smith, a junior at Texas A & M University, was awarded the clinical research scientist scholarship. Ms. Rowbotham aspires to obtain her ABVP certification in feline practice and become the owner of a feline-exclusive hospital. Ms. Meason-Smith is eager to develop an independent research career investigating histoplasmosis and cryptococcosis in cats and is developing novel diagnostics and therapeutics to address these conditions.
 
“Both Nicole and Courtney have demonstrated outstanding leadership skills that have led to many early accomplishments; their zealous pursuit of understanding the unique needs of cats through science will open many doors to them as veterinarians and to the welfare of cats. We aim to support and highlight their enthusiasm for feline medicine so that others will continue on the same path,” said Vicki Thayer, DVM, DABVP (Feline) and Executive Director of Winn.
 
In 2016, the Boards of Directors of both Winn and the AAFP approved the development and implementation of a joint scholarship offered by the two leading feline-dedicated organizations. After an unprecedented number of applicants and positive feedback from veterinary education programs, the boards decided to continue offering this opportunity, expanding the selection to two recipients in the categories of clinical practice and clinical research scientist. The application process prompted students to answer two essay questions explaining their specific interest and background in feline health and welfare, as well as their plans for future participation in feline medicine. Recipients of the $2,500 scholarships are selected based on individual academic achievement, strong leadership, and deep dedication to the study of feline medicine, health, and welfare. For more information, visit: catvets.com.

“We are all impressed by the dedication shown by Nicole and Courtney at such early stages in their careers,” said Heather O’Steen, CAE and Chief Executive Officer of the AAFP. She continues, “Their passion for clinical practice and clinical research, respectively, has already led to phenomenal success in the health and welfare of felines. We’re excited about what they will bring to the future of feline medicine and research.”


The AAFP and Winn are both dedicated to advancing and enhancing standards in feline care. AAFP has numerous resources for veterinary students, such as discounts to the AAFP Annual Conference, and practical resources housed in the Student Center on its website, which includes complimentary webinars and a toolkit for veterinary students. The toolkit contains materials to help veterinary students embrace a feline perspective and obtain further knowledge about the standards needed to elevate care for cats. Winn also offers various educational resources on its website, including the Cat Health News Blog, educational articles, podcasts, videos, and an annual continuing educational symposium. Information regarding research grant awards and cat health study findings are also available on the website or through subscribing to the monthly e-newsletter. Other educational opportunities from Winn and the AAFP can also be found on each website.
                                      
 
 
 
About Winn Feline Foundation
Winn Feline Foundation is a non-profit organization established in 1968 that supports studies to improve cat health. Since 1968, Winn Feline Foundation has funded over $6.4 million in health research for cats at more than 30 partner institutions worldwide. This funding is made possible through the support of dedicated donors and partners. Research supported by Winn Feline Foundation helps veterinarians by providing educational resources that improve treatment of common feline health problems and prevent many diseases. Grants are awarded at least twice yearly with the help of the foundation’s expert review panel. For further information, go to winnfelinefoundation.org.
 
About the American Association of Feline Practitioners
The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) improves the health and welfare of cats by supporting high standards of practice, continuing education and scientific investigation. The AAFP has a long-standing reputation and track record in the veterinary community for facilitating high standards of practice and publishes guidelines for practice excellence, which are available to veterinarians at the AAFP website. Over the years, the AAFP has encouraged veterinarians to continuously re-evaluate preconceived notions of practice strategies in an effort to advance the quality of feline medicine practiced. Launched in 2012, the Cat Friendly Practice® (CFP) program was created to improve the treatment, handling, and overall healthcare provided to cats. Its purpose is to equip veterinary practices with the tools and resources to reduce stress associated with the visit and elevate the standard of care provided to cats. Find more information at catvets.com.
 
 
 
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Hillsborough, NJ (September 6, 2017)The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) has revised its previous 2015 position statement on declawing to strongly oppose declawing (onychectomy) as an elective procedure. 

Scratching is a normal feline behavior. It is the obligation of veterinarians to provide cat owners with education on normal scratching behaviors and options for cats to exhibit appropriate scratching behavior in the home. The AAFP’s position stresses the need for veterinary teams to educate cat caregivers as many are unaware that declawing is a surgical amputation of the third phalanx (or ‘toe bone’).

“The AAFP has been the leader in the world of feline medicine and veterinary care.  It is appropriate that our organization has taken the lead with this strong position statement opposing the declawing of cats,” states Dr. Marcus Brown, Chair of the AAFP’s Welfare Committee.

The AAFP supports a path of change that focuses on educating veterinary teams and cat caregivers in an effort to help them learn and understand in order to make a future impact that sees lasting results. Veterinary teams will be supplied with a toolkit of resources to assist them in educating cat caregivers about why cats have claws, why cats scratch inanimate objects, best practices for living alongside a cat with claws, ideal scratching surfaces, training cats to scratch appropriately, and troubleshooting inappropriate scratching in the home.

These materials provide guidance to veterinary teams and have been freed up for any veterinary practice, including non-members, to download: www.catvets.com/scratching. This information is also available to cat caregivers which can be found on the consumer website, The Cat Community, powered by the AAFP: catfriendly.com/scratching.

Dr. Nancy Suska, co-author of the statement, explains, “With proper client education from the initial veterinary visit and onward, our clients will be able to provide their kittens and cats with the essential means to exhibit this natural feline function.  The American Association of Feline Practitioners has produced many resources, for both owner and veterinary team, to educate about natural feline scratching behavior and alternatives to declawing.”

Other changes to the previous statement include additional resources. To view the revised position statement in its entirety, visit: www.catvets.com/guidelines/position-statements/declawing.

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About the American Association of Feline Practitioners 
The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) improves the health and welfare of cats by supporting high standards of practice, continuing education, and scientific investigation. The AAFP has a long-standing reputation and track record in the veterinary community for facilitating high standards of practice and publishes guidelines for practice excellence which are available to veterinarians on the AAFP website. Over the years, the AAFP has encouraged veterinarians to continuously re-evaluate preconceived notions of practice strategies in an effort to advance the quality of feline medicine practiced. Launched in 2012, the Cat Friendly Practice® (CFP) program was created to improve the treatment, handling, and overall healthcare provided to cats. Its purpose is to equip veterinary practices with the tools and resources to reduce stress associated with the visit and elevate the standard of care provided to cats. Find more information at
www.catvets.com.

 

Wyckoff, NJ; Hillsborough, NJ; May 23, 2017:  Winn Feline Foundation (Winn) and the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) are proud to announce the two recipients of the 2017 joint scholarships for clinical practice and clinical research scientist. Kaarin Muller, a fourth year veterinary student at Washington State University, was selected for the clinical practice scholarship and Liberty Sieberg, a third year veterinary student at Colorado State University, was selected for the clinical research scientist scholarship. Both of the $2,500 scholarships were chosen on individual academic achievements, admirable leadership, and profound dedication to the study of feline medicine, health and welfare.

“Both Kaarin and Liberty have demonstrated outstanding leadership skills and accomplishments, and are passionate about understanding the unique needs of cats which highlight their enthusiasm for feline medicine,” said Vicki Thayer, DVM, DABVP (Feline) and Executive Director of Winn.  

In 2016, the Boards of Directors of both the AAFP and Winn approved the development and implementation of a joint scholarship offered by these two leading feline-dedicated organizations. After a wave of applicants and prestigious feedback from veterinary education programs, the boards decided to offer this opportunity again, expanding the selection to two recipients in the categories of clinical practice and clinical research scientist. The application process prompted students to answer two essay questions explaining his/her specific interest and background in feline health and welfare, and their plans for future participation in feline medicine.  

“We are all impressed by the tremendous success shown by Kaarin and Liberty at such early stages in their careers,” said Heather O’Steen, CAE and Chief Executive Officer of the AAFP. She continues, “Their passion for clinical practice and clinical research, respectively, has enabled both of them to dedicate themselves to the health and welfare of felines.”

The AAFP and Winn are both dedicated to advancing and enhancing standards in feline care. The 2017 AAFP has several resources for veterinary students housed in the Student Center on their website, including complimentary webinars and a Toolkit for Veterinary Students. The toolkit contains materials to help veterinary students embrace a feline perspective and obtain further knowledge about the standards needed to elevate care for cats. Winn also offers various educational

resources on their website including the Cat Health News Blog, educational articles, podcasts, videos, and an annual continuing educational Symposium. Information regarding research grant awards and cat health study findings are also available on the website or through subscribing to their monthly e-newsletter.  

Other educational opportunities from Winn and the AAFP can be found on their websites, listed below. The AAFP is accepting abstracts for poster presentation through June 2, 2017. Accepted abstracts will be presented at the AAFP Annual Conference in Denver on Oct. 19-21. For more information, visit www.catvets.com/education/abstract/abstract-guidelines.

About Winn Feline Foundation

Winn Feline Foundation is a non-profit organization established in 1968 that supports studies to improve cat health. Since 1968, Winn Feline Foundation has funded almost $6.0 million in health research for cats at more than 30 partner institutions worldwide. This funding is made possible through the support of dedicated donors and partners. Research supported by Winn Feline Foundation helps veterinarians by providing educational resources that improve treatment of common feline health problems and prevent many diseases. Grants are awarded at least twice yearly with the help of the foundation’s expert review panel. For further information, go to www.winnfelinefoundation.org.

About the American Association of Feline Practitioners 

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) improves the health and welfare of cats by supporting high standards of practice, continuing education and scientific investigation. The AAFP has a long-standing reputation and track record in the veterinary community for facilitating high standards of practice and publishes guidelines for practice excellence which are available to veterinarians at the AAFP website. Over the years, the AAFP has encouraged veterinarians to continuously re-evaluate preconceived notions of practice strategies in an effort to advance the quality of feline medicine practiced. Launched in 2012, the Cat Friendly Practice® (CFP) program was created to improve the treatment, handling, and overall healthcare provided to cats. Its purpose is to equip veterinary practices with the tools and resources to reduce stress associated with the visit and elevate the standard of care provided to cats. Find more information at www.catvets.com


Early Diagnosis Can Lead to Better Treatment Outcome

HILLSBOROUGH, NJ (May 3, 2016) – Feline hyperthyroidism (FHT) affects nearly 10 percent of feline patients over 10 years of age in the US. FHT is a disease caused by an overactive thyroid gland that secretes excess thyroid hormone. The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) has just released a brochureFeline Hyperthyroidism,” for cat owners which describes the causes, signs, treatment, and management of FHT. Early diagnosis is key to treatment being successful. 

The AAFP’s brochure outlines behaviors or problems cats with FHT may exhibit.  Cat owners are strongly encouraged to contact their veterinarian if they observe the following:

  • weight loss despite a normal or increased appetite
  • increased urination, more urine in the litter box
  • increased drinking or thirst
  • defecation outside of the litter box
  • increased vocalization
  • restlessness, increased activity
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • rarely, lethargy and a lack of appetite
  • poor hair coat, unkempt fur
  • Radioiodine Therapy
  • Medical Therapy
  • Thyroidectomy
  • Nutritional Therapy

“Twice yearly wellness examinations of your cat may allow early detection of FHT, as well as other age-related diseases,” advises Hazel Carney, DVM, MS, DABVP (Canine & Feline), and AAFP Guideline Panel Co-Chair. 

“During the physical examination, your veterinarian may discover increased heart and respiratory rates, hypertension, a palpable thyroid gland, and loss of muscle mass,” said Cynthia Ward, VMD, PhD, DACVIM, and AAFP Guideline Panel Co-Chair “Routine screening of laboratory tests and blood pressure may detect abnormalities before clinical signs of FHT are advanced.” 

If your veterinarian diagnoses your cat with FHT, he or she will discuss and recommend treatment options. The goal of therapy is to restore normal thyroid function and minimize the side effects of treatment without creating lower than normal levels of thyroid hormones.  The most common treatment options are:

On-going monitoring of your cat after any treatment is very important, as well as routine veterinary checkups with your veterinarian. If you have any additional questions, concerns, or notice any sudden changes with your cat, you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

The AAFP would like to thank Dechra Veterinary Products for their sponsorship of this brochure and their commitment to helping the veterinary community increase the standard of care provided for cats.

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About the American Association of Feline Practitioners 
The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) improves the health and welfare of cats by supporting high standards of practice, continuing education and scientific investigation. The AAFP has a long-standing reputation and track record in the veterinary community for facilitating high standards of practice and publishes guidelines for practice excellence which are available to veterinarians at the AAFP website. Over the years, the AAFP has encouraged veterinarians to continuously re-evaluate preconceived notions of practice strategies in an effort to advance the quality of feline medicine practiced. Launched in 2012, the Cat Friendly Practice® (CFP) program was created to improve the treatment, handling, and overall healthcare provided to cats. Its purpose is to equip veterinary practices with the tools and resources to reduce stress associated with the visit and elevate the standard of care provided to cats. Find more information at www.catvets.com.